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BOSTON COLLEG 



»Jl:i< 



RADUATE 



TALOG 



- 1993 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/bostoncollegeund9293bost 



BOSTON 

Oi JJtGfe' 
Boston College Bulletin 

ICHWfcS 

Undergraduate Catalog 
19 9 2-93 



Boston College 
Chestnut Hill 
Massachusetts 02167 
617-552-8000 



BOSTON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Volume LXII. Number 4, May, 1 992 

The Boston College Bulletin contains current information regarding the Uni- 
versity calendar, admissions, degree requirements, fees, regulations and 
course offerings. It is not intended to be and should not be relied upon as a 
statement of the University's contractual undertakings. 

Boston College reserves the right in its sole judgment to make changes 
of any nature in its program, calendar or academic schedule whenever it is 
deemed necessary or desirable, including changes in course content, the re- 
scheduling of classes with or without extending the academic term, cancel- 
ling of scheduled classes and other academic activities, and requiring or af- 
fording alternatives for scheduled classes or other academic activities, in any 
such case giving such notice thereof as is reasonably practicable under the 
circumstances. 

The Boston College Bulletin is published six times a year in April, May, 
July 1, July 15, August, and September. 

Boston College is committed to providing equal opportunity in educa- 
tion and in employment regardless of race, sex, marital or parental status, 
religion, age, national origin or physical/mental handicap. As an employer, 
Boston College is in compliance with the various laws and regulations re- 
quiring equal opportunity and affirmative action in employment, such as Title 
VII of the Civil Rights Act and Federal Executive Order #11246. Boston 
College's policy of equal educational opportunity is in compliance with the 
guidelines and requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, Title IX of 
the Higher Education Amendments Act of 1972, and Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 

USPS— 389— 750 

Second-class postage paid at Boston, Massachusetts 02109. 

Postmaster: send PS Form 3579 to Boston College Registrar's 
Office, Lyons 101, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167. 



Front cover photograph by Gary Gilbert; back cover photograph by Geoff Why; 
design by Boston College Office of Publications and Print Marketing, and Boston 
College Office of the University Registrar 



f % Printed on recycled paper 



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BOSTON COLLEGE 

The University 4 

Undergraduate Education 4 

Accreditation of the University 4 

Academic Resources 4 

Academic Development Center ..4 

Audiovisual Facilities 4 

Computing Support, Service 

and Facilities 5 

The Libraries 5 

The Campus 5 

Tuition and Fees 6 

Policy of Non-Discrimination 6 

Confidentiality of Student Records ..6 

iMassachusetts Medical Insurance 7 

Withdrawals and Refunds 7 

Admission Information 7 

Financial Aid 8 

Student Services 9 

Residence Accommodations 10 

Academic Regulations 1 1 

Study Abroad Programs 1 2 

Irish Studies at University 

College Cork 13 

Sophia University, Tokyo: 

Japan/Boston College 

Exchange 13 

Universite Robert Schuman: 

Strasbourg/Boston College 

Exchange 13 

University of Nijmegen 

(Holland) Student Exchange . 13 
Honors Program Junior Year 

Abroad: Manchester College; 

Mansfield College, University 

of Oxford, England 13 

Abbey Theatre Summer 

Program 13 

Boston/Hangzhou Summer 

Internship Exchange 

Program 13 

Boston/Strasbourg Business 

Internship Exchange 1 3 

Summer Program in Belgium ... 13 
The Washington Semester 

Program 13 

Special Programs 1 3 

Cross Registration Program 13 

The PULSE Program 14 



The Program for the Study 

of Faith, Peace and Justice 14 

Reserve Officer Training 

Programs 14 

University Capstone Courses .... 14 

Course Numbers and Codes 14 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Academic Regulations 15 

Special Academic Programs 18 

The Honors Program 18 

Scholar of the College 18 

Departmental Honors 18 

Independent Major 18 

Bachelor of Arts-Master 

of Social Work Program 18 

Bachelor's-Master's Program 

in Arts and Sciences 18 

Minors in the School of 

Education for Students 

in Arts and Sciences 18 

Secondary Education 18 

General Education 18 

Programs in Computer 

Science 18 

Premedical/Predental Program 18 

Foreign Study 19 

Interdisciplinary Programs 19 

Minors 19 

American Studies 19 

Asian Studies 19 

Biblical Studies 20 

Black Studies 20 

Church History 20 

Cognitive Science 20 

Faith, Peace, and Justice 

Studies 20 

Film Studies 20 

German Studies 20 

International Studies 21 

Irish Studies 21 

Italian Studies 21 

Medieval Studies 21 

Middle Eastern Studies 21 

Modern Greek Studies 22 

Russian and East European 

Studies 22 

Women's Studies 22 



Other Interdisciplinary Programs... 22 
Center for East Europe, Russia 

and Asia (CEERA) 22 

Environmental Studies 22 

The Immersion Program 

in French 22 

The Immersion Program 

in Spanish 22 

Senior Awards and Honors 23 

Areas of Major Study 23 

Biochemistry 23 

Biology 24 

Chemistry 27 

Classical Studies 30 

Communication and Theater 32 

Communication 32 

Theater 33 

Computer Science 38 

Economics 39 

English 42 

Fine Arts 49 

Art History 49 

Studio Art 50 

Geology and Geophysics 54 

Germanic Studies 59 

History 60 

Honors Program 68 

Linguistics 69 

Mathematics 69 

Music 73 

Philosophy 76 

Physics 82 

Political Science 85 

Psychology 89 

Romance Languages and 

Literatures 95 

French 96 

Italian 99 

Spanish 100 

Slavic and Eastern Languages 102 

Sociology 105 

Theology 1 10 

University Courses 117 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

The Preparation of Educators with 
Handicapping Conditions 119 

Academic Regulations 119 

Academic Honors 121 

Majors in Education 122 

Early Childhood Education .... 122 

Elementary Education 122 

Secondary Education 122 

Human Development 122 

Special Needs Education 123 

Intense Special Needs 123 

Fifth Year Programs 123 

Second Majors and Minors for 

Students in Education 123 

Interdisciplinary Majors 123 

Child in Society 123 

Mathematics/Computer 

Science 123 

Human Development Major ... 123 

American Heritages 123 

Perspectives on the Hispanic 

Experience 123 

Minor in Bilingual Education . 124 
Majors and Minors in 

Education for Students 

in the College of Arts 

and Sciences 124 

Minor in Secondary Education 

for Students in the College of 

Arts and Sciences 124 

Minor in General Education ... 124 
Minor in Health Science 124 



THE WALLACE E. CARROLL SCHOOL 
OF MANAGEMENT 

Objectives 131 

Requirements for the Degree 131 

Special Programs 133 

Management Honors Program 133 
Minor in International Studies 

for Management 133 

Pre-Professional Studies 

for Law 134 

Loyola Lectures 134 

The Ethics Initiative 134 

Senior Awards and Honors 134 

Accounting 134 

Business Law 135 

Computer Science 136 

Economics 138 

Finance 138 

General Management 140 

Honors Program 141 

Marketing 141 

Operations and Strategic 
Management 143 

Organization Studies — Human 
Resources Management 146 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Requirements for the Degree 148 

Curriculum Plan 148 

Academic Honors 148 

General Information 149 

Registered Nurses 149 

Academic Regulations 149 

Special Academic Program 150 

Baccalaureate to Master's 
Articulation Plan 150 

Other Regulations ;.... 150 

Faculty 150 

Course Offerings 151 



EVENING COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES AND BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 1 53 

SUMMER SESSION 153 

ADMINISTRATION 1 54 

CAMPUS MAPS 156 

DIRECTORY AND OFFICE 

LOCATIONS 157 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1992-93 .... 1 58 

INDEX 159 



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4 • The UNivERsmr • Academic Resources 



The University 



Having been granted its charter in 1863 by the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, Boston College is one of the 
oldest Jesuit-founded universities in the United States. 
During its first fifty years the college was located in the City of Bos- 
ton. Shortly before World War I, property was acquired in Chest- 
nut Hill and the college was relocated to this suburban community 
six miles west of Boston. 

During the more than fifty years since its relocation the growth 
of Boston College into today's University was particularly evident 
during the 1920s. The Summer Session, the Graduate School of Arts 
and Sciences, the Law School, and the Evening College were added 
in rapid succession to the original College of Arts and Sciences. In 
1927, the College of Liberal Arts at Lenox and the Schools of Phi- 
losophy and Theology at Weston were established as academic units 
of the University. The Graduate School of Social Work was estab- 
lished in 1936, and the College of Business Administration in 1938. 
The latter, and its Graduate School which was established in 1957, 
is now known as the Wallace E. Carroll School of Management. The 
Schools of Nursing and Education were founded, respectively, in 
1947 and 1952. 



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UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION 

In our idealistic moments we call a college a com- 
munity of scholars. The phrase implies that not 
only do collegians meld themselves into a social 
and academic whole, but that faculty members 
and administrators join students in forming an in- 
tegral and discernible community. Boston Col- 
lege is such a community. The members develop, 
in conjunction with persons who have similar high 
hopes for humanity, those distinctive values which 
the Christian tradition can generate when it is in 
contact with the real problems of contemporary 
experiences. 

ACCREDITATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Boston College is a member of, or accredited by, 
the following educational institutions: The 
American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the 
American Association of Colleges for Teacher 
Education, the .American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business, the American Association of 
University Women, the American Bar Associa- 
tion, the American Psychological Association, the 
American Chemical Society, the American Coun- 
cil on Kducation, the Association of American 
Colleges, the Association of American Law 
Schools, the Association for Continuing I Iigher 



Education, the Association of Urban Universities, 
the Board of Regents of the University of New 
York, the College Entrance Examination Board, 
the Council of Graduate Schools, the Council on 
Social Work Education, the Association of Jesuit 
Colleges and Universities, the Institute of Euro- 
pean Studies and Institute of Asian Studies, the 
International Association of Universities, the In- 
ternational Association of Catholic Universities, 
the Interstate Certification Compact, the Na- 
tional Catholic Education Association, the Na- 
tional League for Nursing, the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges, the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, 
Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Sigma Nu, and other simi- 
lar organizations. 

ACADEMIC RESOURCES 

Academic Development Center 

The new Academic Development Center (ADC) 
is designed to support and enhance all aspects of 
academic excellence by helping undergraduates, 
graduate students, and faculty improve learning 
quality and teaching effectiveness. The ADC, 
which opened its doors in September 1991, is 



located on the second floor of O'Neill Library in 
the Eileen M. and John J. Connors, Jr. Learning 
Center. 

The ADC is a comprehensive, inclusive re- 
source serving all of the University's students and 
faculty. To address the needs of the great major- 
ity of Boston College undergraduates, the Cen- 
ter provides tutoring in a wide range of courses 
such as calculus, statistics, biology, chemistry, 
nursing, accounting and classical and foreign lan- 
guages along with training workshops in useful 
study skills and learning strategies. Graduate tu- 
tors in English help students strengthen their 
writing skills. All ADC tutors are recommended 
and certified by their relevant academic depart- 
ments; most are outstanding seniors or graduate 
students. 

The Center offers programs designed to chal- 
lenge the most academically talented, highest 
achieving students, as well as programs designed 
to support those who are least prepared and most 
academically challenged. One member of the 
ADC's professional staff serves the needs of spe- 
cial populations, particularly those students with 
learning disabilities, helping to ensure their aca- 
demic success at Boston College. 

The Center also sponsors seminars, work- 
shops, and discussions for faculty and graduate 
teaching fellows on strategies for successful teach- 
ing and learning. Through these and other activi- 
ties, the new Academic Development Center 
plays an important role in enhancing the quality 
of teaching and learning at Boston College. 

Audiovisual Facilities 

University Audiovisual Services provides the 
academic program with a broad range of instruc- 
tional media and materials support services. These 
include access to over thirty types of classroom 
AV/TV equipment. Also available are audio pro- 
duction services, film and video rentals, television 
recording and editing, graphics production and 
photographic production. Several courses are 
taught in AV's television studio. Students make 
major use of modern post-production editing 
equipment for their TV projects. 

The Language Laboratory, serving all the 
language departments and English for Foreign 
Students, is located in Lyons 313. In addition to 
its 70 state-of-the-art listening/recording stations 
and dual-teacher console, the facility includes 
video and film viewing rooms and three audio- 
interfaced microcomputers. The Lab's audio and 
videotape collection, computer software and other 
audio-visual learning aids directly support and/or 
supplement the curriculum requirements in for- 
eign language, literature and music. The Lan- 
guage Laboratory Director and student lab assis- 
tants are available during the day and evening to 
assist students (undergraduate and graduate) and 
faculty in the operation of equipment and selec- 
tion of appropriate materials for their course-re- 
lated or personal language needs. 



Tiif University • The Campus • 5 



Computing Support, Service and 
Facilities 

The O'Neill Computing Facility is available to 
anyone with a currently valid BC identification 
card. There are approximately 150 workstations 
available, providing access to a wide variety of 
hardware, software, and peripherals. Macintosh 
microcomputers are the most prominent feature 
of the facility. All of the Macintoshes are equipped 
with hard disks and are networked to a Digital 
3800 fileserver. There are also Digital VT-type 
terminals which provide access to the VAX clus- 
ter of super-minicomputers. The VAX cluster 
may also be accessed from off-campus locations 
via modem. Modem access to the VAX cluster is 
available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Addition- 
ally, IBM PS/2 microcomputers are available in 
the Facility for use. 

The Facility is staffed with professionals and 
students who provide assistance with all aspects 
of computing. Users may also be referred to the 
Information Processing Support consulting staff 
located in the basement of Gasson Hall for more 
specialized assistance. Training tutorials and soft- 
ware documentation are available for use within 
the Facility. 

Software applications available on the VAX 
cluster include word processing, programming 
language, statistical analysis packages, graphics 
production, and database management. A similar 
array of software exists in the microcomputing en- 
vironment. Output may be obtained from a vari- 
ety of printing devices including high speed line 
printers, high resolution dot-matrix printers, and 
laser printers. 

The Gasson Help Center is located in Gas- 
son Hall, room 12. It provides support with file 
recovery, media conversion, and limited-access 
technology such as scanners and slide-making 
equipment. It is open Monday through Friday 
from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on a drop-in or 
phone-in basis. 

The Libraries 

The Boston College Libraries offer a wealth of 
resources and services to support the teaching and 
research activities of the University. The book 
collections exceed one million volumes, and ap- 
proximately 14,000 serial titles are currently re- 
ceived. 

Membership in two academic consortia, the 
Boston Library Consortium and the Boston 
Theological Institute, adds still greater dimen- 
sions to the resources of the Boston College Li- 
braries, providing Boston College faculty and 
graduate students who have special research needs 
access to the millions of volumes and other ser- 
vices of the member institutions. 

Through membership in New England Li- 
brary Information Network (NELINET), there 
is on-line access to publishing, cataloging and 
interlibrary loan location from the OCLC, Inc. 
data base, which contains over twenty million 
records from the Library of Congress and from 
more than 6,000 contributing institutions. 



Boston College was among the first schools in 
the country to offer an online public computer 
catalog of its collections. The Libraries' Quest 
computer system provides instant access to infor- 
mation on library holdings, as well as supporting 
book circulation and acquisitions procedures. Stu- 
dents may browse the catalog using video display 
terminals in all the libraries, and faculty may ac- 
cess the catalog from their houses or offices. In 
addition, the libraries offer computer searching 
of hundreds of commercial data bases in the hu- 
manities, sciences, business, and social sciences 
through an in-house CD-ROM network, through 
access to outside databases, and through the Quest 
library system. 

Information on use of the libraries is con- 
tained in the Guide to the Boston College Libraries 
and other brochures available in the libraries. 

The Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. Library, the 
central library of Boston College, opened its doors 
to the public in September 1984. This facility 
contains the research collection in the humani- 
ties, social sciences, education, business, nursing, 
and the sciences. There are over 900,000 book 
volumes, 9,000 active serials, 1,300,000 micro- 
forms and 120,000 government documents, as 
well as a growing audio-visual collection. The 
O'Neill Library is a leader in the utilization of 
technology in library services. The Library's Elec- 
tronic Information Center offers state-of-the-art 
computer systems to assist students and faculty in 
locating library materials both locally and nation- 
ally. 

The Resource Center, located in the base- 
ment of the Newton Chapel, provides study space 
for the residents of the Newton Campus as well 
as a reserve readings collection for courses taught 
on that campus, a music listening facility, and 
microcomputers. 

The School of Social Work Library, Mc- 
Guinn Hall, contains a collection of over 30,000 
volumes, 450 periodical titles, social work theses, 
doctoral dissertations and a growing media col- 
lection. The collection covers the history and phi- 
losophy of social work, its methodology, and all 
aspects of social welfare services. The Library's 
collections and services support master's and doc- 
toral programs offered at the main campus, and 
master's programs offered at four off-campus sites 
throughout Massachusetts and Maine. 

The Law School Library, located on the 
Newton Campus, is a well-rounded collection of 
legal and related materials in excess of 200,000 
volumes. The open stack collection includes pri- 
mary source materials consisting of reports of 
decisions and statutory materials with a broad- 
based collection of secondary research tools in the 
form of textbooks and treatises, legal and related 
periodicals, legal encyclopedias and reference 
works. Basically Anglo-American in character, the 
collection also contains growing numbers of in- 
ternational and comparative law works. The Li- 
brary is also a subscriber to LEXIS and to 
WESTLAW. 

The Bapst Library offers a circulating col- 
lection of contemporary literature and topical 



nonfiction and regularly sponsors programs, ex- 
hibits, and book displays as a part of campus cul- 
tural and educational activities. Approximately 
five hundred seats are available as study space, 
including the Graduate Study Area, an area des- 
ignated for the use of Boston College graduate 
students only. 

The Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. Office is located 
on the fourth level of Bapst Library. The office 
houses furnishings and memorabilia from former 
Speaker of the House O'Neill's Capitol Office in 
Washington, D.C. Visitors are welcome from 
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. weekdays, or by special 
arrangement. 

The John J. Burns Library of Rare Books 
and Special Collections, located in the Bapst 
Library, north entrance, contains the University's 
special collections, including the University's 
Archives. The distinguished and varied collections 
of the Honorable John J. Burns Library speak 
eloquently of the University's commitment to the 
preservation and dissemination of human knowl- 
edge. The Burns Library is home of nearly one 
hundred thousand volumes, more than three mil- 
lion manuscripts, and important collections of ar- 
chitectural records, maps, artworks, photographs, 
films, artifacts, and ephemera. These materials are 
housed in the climate-controlled secure environ- 
ment of Burns Library either because of their rar- 
ity or because of their importance as part of a 
special collection. While treated with special care, 
these resources are available for use at Burns to 
all qualified students, faculty, and researchers. 
Indeed, their use is strongly encouraged, and visi- 
tors to Burns are always welcome, either simply 
to browse or to make use of the collections. 

Though its collections cover virtually the en- 
tire spectrum of human knowledge, the Burns 
Library has achieved international recognition in 
several specific areas of research, most notably in 
Irish studies, British Catholic authors, Jesuitana, 
fine print, Catholic liturgy and life in America, 
1925-75, Boston history, Caribbeana, and Con- 
gressional archives. It has also won acclaim for 
significant holdings on nursing, detective fiction, 
Thomas Merton, Japanese prints, Colonial and 
early Republic Protestantism, and banking. 

The Geophysics Library, located at Weston 
Observatory, contains a specialized collection of 
over 8,000 monographs and journals on earth 
sciences, particularly seismology. 

The Educational Resource Center, located 
in Campion Hall, serves the School of Education's 
faculty and students. The collection includes cur- 
riculum and instructional materials, educational 
and psychological tests, and educationally-ori- 
ented information technology. 

THE CAMPUS 

Located on the border between the city of Bos- 
ton and the suburb of Newton, Boston College 
derives benefits from its proximity to a large met- 
ropolitan city and its setting in a residential sub- 
urb. Often cited as a model of university planning, 
the campus is spread over more than 200 acres of 



Tut University • TunoN \xn Ff.f.s 



UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES FOR 1992-93 ACADEMIC YEAR 



Undergraduate Tuition 

• First semester tuition and fees are due by August 1 5, 1 992. 

• Tuition first semester— $7,290.00 

• Second semester tuition and fees are due by December 15, 1992. 

• Tuition second semester — $7,290.00 

Restrictions will be placed on any account which is not resolved by the due dates above. These restrictions 
include denied access to Housing and the Athletic Complex, use of the Meal Plan, and the ability to drop and 
add courses and to cash checks at the Cashier's Office. In severe cases, students will be withdrawn from the 
University. In addition, a $1 00.00 late payment fee will be assessed on any account which is not resolved 
by the due dates listed above. There will be absolutely no registration or confirmation of registration allowed 
after November 6, 1992 for first semester and April 8, 1993 for second semester. 

Payment should be made by check or postal money order and mailed to Boston College Cashier's Office, 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167-3819. Scholarship holders are not exempt from payment of registration, 
acceptance deposits, insurance and fees at the time prescribed. 

Undergraduate General Fees* 

• Application Fee (not refundable) $45.00 

• Acceptance Deposit 200.00 

This deposit will be applied towards students' tuition in the second semester of their senior year. Students forfeit 
this deposit if they withdraw prior to completing their first semester. Students who withdraw after completing 
their first semester are entitled to a refund of this deposit (provided they do not have an outstanding 
Student account) if they formally withdraw prior to July 1 for fall semester, or December 1 for spring 
semester. 

Health Fee 232.00 

Identification Card 15.00 

Late Payment Fee 100.00 

Recreation Fee — payable annually 136.00 

Undergraduate Special Fees* 

Certificates, Transcripts 2.00 

Extra Course — per semester hour credit 486.00 

Laboratory Fee — per semester 45.00-150.00 

Mass. Medical Insurance 550.00 per year 

($230.00 first semester, $320.00 second semester) 

Nursing Laboratory Fee (payable for each clinical nursing course) 140.00 

NCLEX Assessment Test 35.00 

Exemption Examination 30.00-60.00 

Readmission Fee 40.00 

Special Students — per semester hour credit 486.00 

Student Activity Fee 54.00 per year 

($27.00 per semester) 

Resident Student Expenses 

• Board — per semester 1 ,460.00 

• Room Fee (includes Mail Service) per semester (varies depending on room) ..$1,775.00-2,380.00 

• Room Guarantee Deposit** 200.00 

Students accepted as residents are required to deposit a $200 room guarantee fee. This fee is applied towards 
the student's first semester housing charges. Seniors do not have this fee applied to their first semester's housing 
charges; it is refunded after the second semester once any room damage charges have been assessed and 
deducted. 

*AII fees are proposed and subject to change. 

• 'Incoming students who withdraw from housing by June 1 will have 1 00% of their deposit refunded. 
Incoming students who withdraw from housing between June 1 and July 1 5 will have 50% of their 
deposit refunded. Upperclassmen who withdraw from housing prior to August 1 5 will have 1 00% of 
their deposit refunded. No refunds will be made to incoming students who withdraw after July 1 5 or to 
upperclassmen who withdraw after August 1 5. Refunds will be determined by the date the written notification 
of withdrawal is received by the Office of University Housing. 

The Trustees of Boston College reserve the right to change the tuition rates and to make additional charges 
within the University whenever such action is deemed necessary. 



tree-covered Chestnut Hill. Yet it is just a few 
miles from culturally and socially rich Boston. 

The Chestnut Hill campus is tri-level. Dor- 
mitories are on the upper campus; classroom, 
laboratory, administrative and student service fa- 
cilities are on the middle campus; and the lower 
campus includes the Robsham Theater, the Conte 
Forum, modular and apartment residences, and 
recreational and parking facilities. 

The Newton campus is situated one and one- 
half miles from the Chestnut Hill campus. The 
Law School is located on this easily accessible 40- 
acre tract, which also contains undergraduate 
classrooms, dormitories, athletic areas and student 
service facilities. 

POLICY OF NON-DISCRIMINATION 

Boston College is an academic community whose 
doors are open to all students without regard to 
race, religion, age, sex, marital or parental status, 
national origin, veteran status, or disability. The 
Director of Affirmative Action has been desig- 
nated to coordinate the College's efforts to com- 
ply with and carry out its responsibilities to pre- 
vent discrimination in accordance with state and 
federal laws. Any applicant for admission or em- 
ployment, as well as any student, member of the 
faculty and all employees are welcome to raise 
questions regarding violation of this policy with 
Barbara Marshall, Office of Affirmative Action, 
More Hall 315, x2947. In addition, any person 
who believes that an act of discrimination based 
upon sex has occurred at Boston College, may 
raise those issues with the Assistant Secretary for 
Civil Rights of the United States Department of 
Education. 

Boston College has designated the Director 
of Affirmative Action as the person responsible for 
coordinating its efforts to comply with Section 
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (prohibit- 
ing discrimination against individuals with dis- 
abilities in employment) and Title IX of the Edu- 
cation Amendments of 1 972 prohibiting discrimi- 
nation on the basis of sex. 

CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT 

RECORDS 

As a matter of necessity, Boston College continu- 
ously records a large number of specific items 
relating to its students. This information is nec- 
essary to support its educational programs as well 
as to administer housing, athletics and extracur- 
ricular programs. The College also maintains 
certain records such as employment, financial and 
accounting information for its own use and to 
comply with state and federal regulations. Boston 
College has committed itself to protect the pri- 
vacy rights of its students and to maintain the con- 
fidentiality of its records. In addition, the College 
endorses and complies with the Family Educa- 
tional Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974 (the Buckley 
Amendment), a federal statute which requires that 
students be permitted to review records in their 
files and offers them the possibility of correcting 
errors which they may discover. Students or oth- 
ers seeking more complete information regard- 
ing their specific rights and responsibilities of the 
University will find copies of the Family Educa- 
tional Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974 and the rules 



Thf University • Admission Information 



• 7 



and regulations for compliance with the Act on 
file in the University Library or in the Office of 
University Policies and Procedures in More Hall. 
Certain personally identifiable information 
from a student's education record, designated by 
Boston College as directory information, may be 
released without the student's prior consent. This 
information includes name, term and home ad- 
dress, telephone number, date and place of birth, 
major field of study, participation in officially rec- 
ognized activities and sports, weight and height 
of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, 
degrees and awards received, the most recent pre- 
vious educational agency or institution attended, 
and other similar information. Unless advised to 
the contrary, the College will release student tele- 
phone numbers and verify only all other directory 
information. A student who so wishes has the 
absolute right to prevent release of this informa- 
tion. In order to do so, the student must complete 
a form requesting nondisclosure of directory in- 
formation, which is available in the Registrar's 
Office. 

MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL INSURANCE 

Massachusetts State Law has mandated that all 
students taking at least 75% of full-time credit 
hours must be covered by medical insurance pro- 
viding a specified minimum coverage. Boston 
College will offer all students the option of par- 
ticipating in the plan offered at the University or 
submitting a waiver form. The waiver must in- 
clude specific insurance information on the com- 
parable insurance plan covering the student. 
Waivers will be mailed to all students and are 
available upon request at the Student Account 
Office. The waiver must be returned by July 1 , 
1992 for the fall semester and by November 15, 
1 992 for the spring semester. Students who do not 
submit a waiver by the due dates above will auto- 
matically be enrolled and billed for the required 
Massachusetts Medical Insurance (see Special 
Fees, p. 6.) 

CHECK CASHING 

Students who present a valid Boston College ID 
may cash checks ($50 limit) at the Cashier's Of- 
fice, More Hall, Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m. -4:30 
p.m. There is a 50c service charge. Returned 
checks will be fined in the following manner: 
First three checks returned — $15.00 per check 
All subsequent checks — $25.00 per check 
Any check in excess of $2000.00— $50.00 per 
check 

Check cashing privileges are revoked after the 
third returned check. 

ACCELERATION 

Full-time undergraduate students authorized by 
the Dean's Office to take accelerated programs 
leading to an early graduation will be billed by 
Student Accounts for extra courses taken during 
a regular semester at the rate of $486.00 per credit 
taken. This will be in addition to the flat rate tu- 
ition charge covering a normal load (four courses 
per semester as a senior; five courses per semes- 
ter prior to senior year). No additional fee will be 
assessed for extra courses taken for enrichment 
purposes only, and not to accelerate a degree pro- 



gram. However, when a student who has taken 
extra courses for enrichment later wishes to use 
those courses for acceleration, a fee will be as- 
sessed based on the tuition rate that was in effect 
when the courses were taken. Whenever a student 
has been given approval to take Boston College 
summer courses for acceleration, he or she will 
pay the regular Summer Session tuition for those 
courses. 

WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 

Fees are not refundable. 

Undergraduate tuition is cancelled subject to the 
following conditions: 

1. Notice of withdrawal must be made in writing 
to: University Registrar, Boston College, Lyons 
112, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167 

2. The date of receipt of written notice of with- 
drawal by the University Registrar determines the 
amount of tuition cancelled. 

3. The cancellation schedule shown below will 
apply to students withdrawing voluntarily, as well 
as to students who are dismissed from the Uni- 
versity for academic or disciplinary reasons. 

Undergraduate students withdrawing by the fol- 
lowing dates will receive the tuition refund indi- 
cated below. 

First Semester 

by Aug. 28, 1992: 100% of tuition charged is 
cancelled 

by Sept. 11, 1992: 80% of tuition charged is 
cancelled 

by Sept. 18, 1992: 60% of tuition charged is 
cancelled 

by Sept. 25, 1992: 40% of tuition charged is 
cancelled 

by Oct. 2, 1992: 20% of tuition charged is 
cancelled 

Second Semester 

by Jan. 15, 1993: 100% of tuition charged is 
cancelled 

by Jan. 29, 1993: 80% of tuition charged is 
cancelled 

by Feb. 5, 1993: 60% of tuition charged is 
cancelled 

by Feb. 12, 1993: 40% of tuition charged is 
cancelled 

by Feb. 19, 1993: 20% of tuition charged is 
cancelled. 

No cancellations are made after the 5th week of classes. 

If a student does not wish to leave any result- 
ing credit balance on his or her account for sub- 
sequent use, he or she should request, in writing 
or in person, that the Student Account Office is- 
sue a refund. 

Federal regulations establish procedural 
guidelines applicable to the treatment of refunds 
whenever the student has been the recipient of 
financial assistance through any program autho- 
rized under Title IV of the Higher Education Act 
of 1965. These guidelines pertain to the Perkins 
(formerly National Direct Student) Loan, the Pell 
Grant, the Supplemental Educational Opportu- 
nity Grant, the College Work-Study, and the 
Stafford (formerly Guaranteed Student) Loan 
programs. In such cases, the regulations require 



that a portion of any refund be returned to the 
Title IV Program. Further, if a student withdraws, 
the institution must determine if any cash dis- 
bursements of Title IV funds, made directly to the 
student by the institution for noninstructional 
purposes, is an overpayment that must be repaid 
to the Title IV program. University policy devel- 
oped to comply with the regulations at Boston 
College will be available upon request from the 
Financial Aid Office. 

ADMISSION INFORMATION 

Boston College is an academic community whose 
doors are open to men and women regardless of 
race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, or 
handicap. 

Boston College seeks to maintain an under- 
graduate student body which represents a broad 
variety of abilities, backgrounds, and interests. In 
selecting students, therefore, the Committee on 
Admission looks for demonstrated evidence of 
academic ability, intellectual curiosity, strength of 
character, motivation, energy, and promise for 
personal growth and development. Requests for 
financial aid do not affect decisions on admission. 
Application forms and information bulletins may 
be obtained from the Undergraduate Admission 
Office, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Av- 
enue, Lyons Hall Room 120, Chestnut Hill, Mas- 
sachusetts 02167. 

Admission From Secondary School 

While specific courses are not required, the Un- 
dergraduate Admission Office recommends that 
students pursue a strong college preparatory pro- 
gram which includes four units of English, math- 
ematics, and foreign language, as well as three 
units of a lab science. Such a program provides a 
solid foundation for high quality college work. 

Applicants to the School of Nursing are re- 
quired to complete at least two years of a lab sci- 
ence, including a unit of chemistry. Also, students 
applying to The Wallace E. Carroll School of 
Management are strongly encouraged to com- 
plete four years of mathematics. 

Entrance Examination 

The following tests of the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board (CEEB) must be completed by 
each applicant no later than January of the senior 
year: 

• Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) 

• Three Achievement Tests in: 

1) English; 

2) Mathematics Level I or II; and, 

3) Third Test of the applicant's choice 

The SAT may be taken in either the junior or the 
senior year. The Committee on Admission will 
select the best combination of test scores when 
evaluating an application. The American College 
Test (ACT) is acceptable in place of the SAT and 
the Achievement Tests. 

Application Procedures 

Students applying to Boston College should sub- 
mit the Preliminary Application (available in the 
Admission Viewbook or Bulletin) by January 10 
and the Secondary Application by January 25. 
When the student's completed Preliminary Ap- 
plication is submitted with the $45 application fee, 
the Admission Office will mail the Secondary 



8 • The University • Financial Aid 



Application to the student. Candidates are noti- 
fied of action taken on their applications between 
April 1 and April 15. 

Superior students who are seriously consider- 
ing Boston College may want to apply through 
the Early Action Program. This would necessi- 
tate submitting the Preliminary Application by 
November 1 and the Secondary Application by 
November 15. Candidates will learn of the Ad- 
mission Committee decision by December 1 5, but 
they will have the same deadline (May 1) as the 
other candidates to reserve their places. 

Admission by Transfer 

Candidates for admission-in-transfer to Boston 
College from another college or university should 
follow the procedure for regular application to the 
freshman class. In addition transfer applicants 
must submit complete, official transcripts of all 
courses taken in all semesters at other colleges or 
universities. 

Admission-in-transfer is granted for the fall 
term beginning in September and for the spring 
term beginning in January. 

Usually only those transfer applicants who 
have maintained a grade point average of 2.5 or 
higher will be considered for transfer to Boston 
College. Credits will be accepted for transfer only 
for courses which are equivalent to those offered 
at Boston College. 

The residency requirements for transfer stu- 
dents will be determined by the number of courses 
accepted in transfer and the number of Boston 
College semesters these courses satisfy. 

Transfer students are required to complete a 
minimum of two years' work (the equivalent of 1 8 
courses or 54 semester credit hours) (61 semes- 
ter credit hours are required by the School of 
Nursing) at Boston College in order to qualify for 
an undergraduate degree from the University. 

Transfer students admitted to sophomore sta- 
tus or above may not accelerate their academic 
program to advance the graduation date assigned 
by the Admission Office at the time of their ac- 
ceptance to Boston College. However, transfer 
students may, with prior approval, carry overload 
courses to make up deficiencies or to complete the 
number of courses appropriate to their assigned 
status. 

Please consult the Transfer Student Information 
Bulletin for information on application deadlines, 
financial aid, and specific restrictions on the trans- 
fer of credit to particular undergraduate divisions. 
Candidates who are accepted will at the same time 
be notified of the terms of admission and credits 
to be allowed in transfer. 

Special Students 

Only those persons who wish to be enrolled as full- 
time day students and candidates for the bacca- 
laureate program for registered nurses are admit- 
ted by the Office of Undergraduate Admission. 
Students in the baccalaureate program for regis- 
tered nurses are encouraged to enroll full-time, 
but part-time study for individual semesters may 
be arranged by permission of the Dean of the 
School of Nursing. All other students wishing to 
attend Boston College on a part-time basis, for 
either day or evening classes, should contact: 
Dean of the Evening College, Fulton I [all, Room 
314, Boston College, Chestnut I [ill, MA 02167. 



Advanced Placement 

Boston College participates in the Advanced 
Placement Program of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Applicants inter- 
ested in advanced placement should make ar- 
rangements to take the Advanced Placement 
Tests given by the C.E.E.B. in May of each year. 
The tests may be taken in the junior as well as the 
senior year of high school. Advanced placement 
is awarded in specific areas as noted below. NB: 
In all subjects, advanced placement does not sub- 
stitute for any of the 38 courses required for 
graduation. 

English: Students receiving a 3 on the A.P. exam 
in English are required to take only one semester 
of the two-semester English Core requirement. 
Students receiving a 4 or 5 on the test are exempt 
from both semesters of the Core requirement. 
Two other courses of the student's choice must 
be substituted. 

History: The A.P. exam in American History 
does not fulfill the history Core requirement of 
two European history courses. The A.P. exam in 
European History does not fulfill the Core re- 
quirement, but students receiving a 4 or 5 on the 
exam are allowed to take two higher-level history 
courses to fulfill the Core requirement. 
Natural Science: The A.P. exam in science does 
not fulfill the Core natural science requirement. 
Students who have taken the exam in science may 
take higher-level courses in the science in which 
they took the exam, but must still complete a year 
of science. 

Social Science: Students receiving a 4 or a 5 on 
the A.P. test in either Government or Politics 
are exempt from half the social science Core re- 
quirement. 

The A.P. exams in Economics do not fulfill 
the Core Social Science requirement. Students 
who have taken these exams may take higher-level 
courses in economics or Core-level courses in 
another social science to fulfill the requirement. 
Mathematics/Computer Science: Students re- 
ceiving a score of 4 or more on the AP Calculus 
exam, or a 3 or more on the BC Calculus exam, 
are exempt from the two-course Core require- 
ment in mathematics. Students receiving a score 
of 3 or more on the exam in Computer Science 
are exempt from half the mathematics Core re- 
quirement for A&S and Education students. 
Fine Arts: Students receiving a score of 3 or more 
on the Art History exam or the Studio Art exam 
are exempt from half the cluster Core require- 
ment for A&S students. 

A&S and CSOM Foreign Language Profi- 
ciency Requirement: Students receiving a score 
of 3 or better on the A.P. test, or a score of 500 
or better on the Achievement Test in French, 
German, Spanish, or Classics have fulfilled the 
language proficiency requirement. 

Advanced placement can also be earned for 
college courses completed at an accredited insti- 
tution prior to enrollment at Boston College in 
which the student has earned a grade of C or bet- 
ter. Official college transcripts of these courses 
should be forwarded to the Admission Office by 
August 1. 

Should a student earn 18 or more credits, 
whether through superior performance on a mini- 
mum of three A.P. tests or through acceptance of 



at least six three-credit courses or any combina- 
tion of these two methods, he or she will be eli- 
gible for advanced standing. Should fewer than 1 8 
credits be earned, the student may still be excused 
from Core requirements; however, electives must 
be substituted for these Core courses. Thirty- 
eight courses will still be required for graduation 
from Boston College. 

Early Admission 

Under the Early Admission Program, outstand- 
ingly gifted and highly motivated high school jun- 
iors are sometimes admitted to Boston College 
one year early. Early Admission candidates must 
obtain from their high school a letter stating that 
either they have completed all their requirements 
for graduation, or that they will receive their di- 
ploma after the freshman year at Boston College. 
All Early Admission candidates are required to 
arrange for a personal interview at Boston Col- 
lege. Decisions on Early Admission applications 
are made after the receipt of the final grades in 
the junior year. 

AHANA* Admission Information 

*AHANA is an acronym for African-American, 
Hispanic, Asian and Native American students. 
Boston College welcomes and encourages 
applications from students of all backgrounds and 
cultures. Although the entire Admission Staff is 
charged with the task of recruiting culturally and 
ethnically diverse students for Boston College, a 
select group of admission professionals evaluate 
the applications from African-American, Asian, 
Hispanic and Native American students, review- 
ing these applications in light of the applicant's 
cultural and educational background. Each year, 
a small group of AHANA students is invited to 
attend Boston College through the Options 
Through Education Transitional Summer Pro- 
gram. This program is designed to assist those 
students who may have some educational disad- 
vantages, but do demonstrate academic potential 
and motivation. 

International Student Admission 

Boston College welcomes the International appli- 
cant. The International Student Admission Pro- 
gram is responsible for the recruitment, process- 
ing and evaluation of all international applica- 
tions. Students are expected to submit the same 
credentials (transcripts, recommendations, SATs, 
Achievements, etc.) as American applicants. Any 
international student whose native language is not 
English is required to take the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam. All docu- 
ments should be submitted in English. If the cre- 
dentials must be translated, the original must be 
submitted along with the translation. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Boston College offers a variety of assistance pro- 
grams to help students finance their education. A 
student wishing financial assistance must com- 
plete and file the following documents: 

1 . The Boston College Financial Aid Application/ 
Validation Form 

2. The Financial Aid Form (FAF) 

3. A signed copy of student's and parents' most 
recent Federal Tax Return 

The above forms generally become available 
in the Financial Aid Office (Lyons 210) each 



The University • Student Services 



December for the following academic year. All 
students who receive financial assistance from or 
through Boston College are required to file a 
complete financial aid application each year. 

Most forms of assistance at Boston College, 
whether institutional, federal or state, are awarded 
on the basis of financial need (possibly combined 
with academic performance or some other special 
skill). Need is defined as the difference between 
the total expenses of attending Boston College 
and the calculated ability of the family to contrib- 
ute towards those expenses. Students with the 
greatest financial need are given preference for 
most financial aid programs, and, thus, tend to 
receive larger financial aid awards. 

The University's estimate of a student's finan- 
cial need is based on an analysis of the informa- 
tion supplied on the Financial Aid Form, the 
Boston College Financial Aid Application/Vali- 
dation Form and the tax returns. A financial aid 
award or package will combine funds from vari- 
ous sources of assistance. These sources can in- 
clude either institutional, federal or state funds 
and can be in the form of grant, loan or work. All 
students applying for financial aid are expected to 
make application to their own state scholarship 
program (residents of Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Ver- 
mont, Pennsylvania, Maine, and Maryland) as 
well as to the Federal Pell grant program. Stu- 
dents are expected to comply with all regulations 
governing the program(s) from which they receive 
assistance. 

Several assumptions are made in determining 
a student's financial aid award. A primary assump- 
tion is that the student and the family have the first 
responsibility to pay college expenses. All students 
are expected to borrow a $2625 Stafford Loan 
(formerly Guaranteed Student Loan) each year. 
Students are also expected to work on a limited 
basis (10-20 hours per week) during the academic 
year. 

Financial resources are limited. It is Boston 
College's intent to use these limited resources in 
such a way that the greatest number of students 
will benefit. Total financial assistance received by 
a student cannot exceed total need. In the event 
that a student receives other, "outside" assistance 
after Boston College has awarded aid, the student 
is required to report these awards to the Finan- 
cial Aid Office and the University may be required 
to adjust the aid it is offering. However, it is Bos- 
ton College policy that the student will receive 
primary benefit from any outside award. Thus, an 
outside award will be used first, to reduce unmet 
financial need and second, to reduce the self-help 
component (loan or work) of a financial aid award. 
Only after those considerations would scholarship 
or grant monies possibly be affected. 

It is the student's responsibility to know and 
comply with all requirements and regulations of 
the financial aid programs in which they partici- 
pate. Financial aid awards may be reduced or can- 
celled if the requirements of the award are not 
met. A student receiving renewable Boston Col- 
lege Scholarship or Grant funds must maintain a 
cumulative average of 3.0 and 2.5, respectively, in 
addition to financial eligibility, in order to keep 
the award. Academic performance is reviewed at 
the end of each year to determine renewal eligi- 



bility. Also, students receiving a Perkins Loan 
and/or a Nursing Student Loan are expected to 
accept responsibility for the promissory note and 
all other agreements that they sign. Students must 
comply with all College Work-Study dates and 
deadlines. A student's work-study award will be 
cancelled if he or she has failed to secure a job and 
to return the completed Hire Form by October 
1. 

All financial aid awards are made under the 
assumption that the student status (full-time, part- 
time, half-time, Evening) has not changed. Any 
change in the student's status must be reported 
to the Financial Aid Office as it can affect the fi- 
nancial aid award. In addition, all financial aid 
applicants must be maintaining satisfactory 
progress in their course of study. Satisfactory aca- 
demic progress is defined by the dean of each 
school at Boston College. Students should check 
with their respective deans for this definition. If 
a student is not maintaining satisfactory academic 
progress, the student should consult with his or 
her dean to determine what steps must be taken 
to reestablish his or her status and, thus, eligibil- 
ity to receive financial aid. 

Students participating in the Foreign Study 
Program or Resident Assistant (RA) programs are 
encouraged to check with their financial aid coun- 
selor as this program may affect receipt of Bos- 
ton College Scholarship or Grant funds. 

Specific information on the various programs, 
conditions, and procedures, and the various finan- 
cial aid deadline dates, can be found in the Bos- 
ton College Student Guide, the Boston College 
Financial Aid Application/Validation Form, the 
Boston College Financial Aid Award Letter, and 
the Financial Aid Instruction Booklet. Students 
are expected to be familiar with the contents of 
these sources as well as all other materials or docu- 
ments which may be distributed by the Boston 
College Financial Aid Office. 

Financial aid recipients have the right to ap- 
peal their financial aid award. However, the stu- 
dent should understand that Boston College has 
already awarded the best financial aid package 
possible based on the information supplied. 
Therefore, any appeal made should be based on 
new, additional information not already included 
in the student's original application material. An 
appeal should be made by letter to the student's 
financial aid counselor. Students who have lost 
Boston College Scholarship or Grant funds due 
to failure to maintain the required cumulative 
average have the right to appeal that decision. The 
student may appeal to request additional aid to 
meet any unmet need created by the loss of a re- 
newable award; or to appeal the actual withdrawal 
of the guarantee on an award by presenting any 
extenuating circumstances that may have affected 
his or her past academic performance. 

When applying for financial aid, the student 
has the right to ask: 

• what the cost of attending is, and what the poli- 
cies are on refunds to students who drop out. 

• what financial assistance is available, including 
information on all Federal, State, local, private, 
and institutional financial aid programs. 

• what the procedures and deadlines are for sub- 
mitting applications for each available financial 
aid program. 



• what criteria the institution uses to select finan- 
cial aid recipients. 

• how the institution determines financial need. 
This process includes how costs for tuition and 
fees, room and board, travel, books and supplies, 
personal and miscellaneous expenses, etc. are con- 
sidered in the student's budget. It also includes 
what resources (such as parental contribution, 
other financial aid, student assets, etc.) are con- 
sidered in the calculation of need. 

• how much of the student's financial need, as 
determined by the institution, has been met. 

Students also have the right to request an ex- 
planation of each type of aid, and the amount of 
each, in their financial aid award package. Stu- 
dents receiving loans have the right to know what 
the interest rate is, the total amount that must be 
repaid, the length of time given to repay the loan, 
when repayment must commence, and any can- 
cellation and deferment provisions that apply. 
Students offered a Work-Study job have the right 
to know what kind of job it is, what hours are ex- 
pected, what the duties will be, what the rate of 
pay will be, and how and when they will be paid. 

A student also has the responsibility to: 

• pay special attention to his or her application 
for student financial aid, complete it accurately, 
and submit it on time to the right place. Errors 
can delay the receipt of the financial aid package. 

• provide all additional information requested by 
either the Financial Aid Office or the agency to 
which the application was submitted. 

• read and understand all forms he or she is asked 
to sign, and keep copies of them. 

• perform in a satisfactory manner the work that 
is agreed upon in accepting a College Work- 
Study job. 

• know and comply with the deadlines for appli- 
cations or reapplications for financial aid. 

• know and comply with the College's refund pro- 
cedures. 

• notify the Financial Aid Office of any change 
in their status. 

• attend an Entrance Interview if he or she is a 
new loan borrower. 

• attend an Exit Interview prior to withdrawal or 
graduation. 

STUDENT SERVICES 

AHANA Student Programs 

(African-American, Hispanic, Asian and Native 
American) 

The goal of this office is to promote the opti- 
mal academic achievement of AHANA students 
at Boston College, especially those identified as 
being at an educational disadvantage. Among the 
services offered by this office are: tutorial assis- 
tance; academic advisement; individual and group 
counseling; tracking of academic performance; 
and career counseling. In addition to these ser- 
vices, the office assists various AHANA student 
organizations in developing and implementing 
cultural programs. 

Options Through Education Program: 
Sponsored by the Office of AHANA Student 
Programs, this six-week summer residential pro- 



10 



The University • Residence Accommodations 



gram has as its objective the goal of equipping 40 
pre-freshmen, identified by the Admissions Of- 
fice as being at an educational and economic dis- 
advantage, with the skills necessary to successfully 
negotiate Boston College's curriculum. At the 
core ot the program's curriculum is a focus on im- 
parting skills in two critical areas: English and 
Mathematics. In addition to a focus on academ- 
ics, the program seeks to introduce its students to 
the diverse resources available at Boston College 
and in the greater Boston community. 

Athletics 

The objective of the Boston College Athletic As- 
sociation is to provide members of the entire uni- 
versity community with the opportunity to par- 
ticipate in, at the involvement level of one's 
choice, a program of physical activity which 
complements their spiritual, academic, cultural 
and social growth. 

To meet the needs of a diverse community, 
the Athletic Association offers activities at five 
levels: unstructured recreation, instruction, orga- 
nized intramural sports, club sports and 
intercollegiate competition in 3 1 varsity sports for 
men and women. 

Career Center 

Career planning can begin as early as freshman 
or sophomore year, allowing for ample time dur- 
ing one's college years to research and explore 
career fields which encompass one's interests, 
values, and skills. 

The Career Center provides workshops, in- 
dividual counseling and informational resources 
on all aspects of career decision-making, and, for 
those seeking summer jobs or full-time employ- 
ment, assistance with the techniques involved in 
job-hunting. 

The workshop "Jobs, Options, and You" is es- 
pecially valuable in providing a focus for career 
exploration. From this workshop, students move 
into active use of the Center's wealth of occupa- 
tional information. The Center's Career Re- 
source Library contains books, files, and video- 
tapes on career fields, graduate schools, specific 
employers, and job-hunting techniques. An easy- 
to-use computerized career guidance system, pro- 
vides interest and skill assessment, as well as de- 
scriptive information about more than 400 ca- 
reers. The Career Information Network consists 
of more than 800 alumni volunteers who host stu- 
dents at their workplaces and discuss the realities 
of their career fields. 

The Boston College Internship Program pro- 
vides a clearinghouse of career-related internships 
enabling students to integrate coursework with 
practical field experience. 

lor the job-hunting student, the Center pro- 
vides tjroup and individual advising in resume- 
writing, interviewing, and job-hunting tech- 
niques; an on-campus recruiting program; current 
job listings; and a credentials service. 

There's something for everyone, freshmen 
through graduate students and alumni, from ev- 
er} school and major, at the Career Center. Visit 
the office at 38 Commonwealth Avenue and pick 
up the Center's monthly publications. 

Chaplains 

The Chaplains Office strives to deepen the faith 
of Boston College students by offering opportu- 



nities to discover, grow in, express and celebrate 
the religious dimensions of their lives in person- 
ally relevant ways. In addition, it works to foster 
justice by developing social awareness and to build 
a sense of community as a Christian value in the 
whole University. Offices are located in McElroy 
Commons, Room 215, x3475. 

Dean for Student Development 

The Office of the Dean for Student Development 
coordinates the planning, implementation and 
evaluation of programs and services promoting 
student development. This includes overseeing 
student clubs and organizations, programming, 
judicial affairs, off-campus and commuting stu- 
dent affairs, and international student services. 
The Dean and assistants are also responsible for 
coordinating policies and procedures concerning 
student conduct and discipline, the judicial pro- 
cess, and the Administrator-On-Call program. 

Dining Services 

The University offers service in five dining area 
locations for resident students with a complete 
and nutritionally-balanced menu: McElroy Com- 
mons, Eagles Nest and Lyons Hall on Middle 
Campus, Stuart Hall on Newton Campus, and 
Walsh Cafeteria on Lower Campus. In addition, 
students can use their Meal Plan in the Golden 
Lantern Restaurant, Grocery convenience stores, 
The Club, the Cafe, and the concessions at Conte 
Forum. 

The Meal Plan is mandatory for resident stu- 
dents living in Upper Campus, Newton Campus, 
Walsh Hall, 66 Commonwealth Ave. and 
Greycliff dormitories. The cost of the full Meal 
Plan for the 1992-93 year is $1 ,460.00 per semes- 
ter or $2,920.00 per year. 

Optional meal plans are available to all other 
students living in on or off-campus apartments, 
or to commuters. Rates vary. 

Further information can be obtained by con- 
tacting the University Meal Plan Office, 552-3533 
or x3533, Lyons Hall IB. A Dietician is available 
to those students with special dietary needs or 
restrictions by calling 552-3178 or x3178. 

Disabled Student Services 

Disabled students applying to Boston College are 
strongly encouraged to make their disability 
known voluntarily to the Admission Office on the 
appropriate section of the application form. This 
information will not affect the decision on admis- 
sion; rather, it will give the University the oppor- 
tunity to offer specific assistance and support 
through programs and services provided by dif- 
ferent departments on campus. 

For more information regarding building and 
program accessibility for students with physical 
disabilities, contact John Hennessy, Coordinator 
of Services for Physically Challenged Students, 
Gasson Hall 108, 617-552-33 10. For more infor- 
mation regarding services for students with learn- 
ing disabilities, contact Dr. David John Smith, 
University Counseling Services, Gasson Hall 108, 
617-552-3310. 

Health Services 

The primary goal of the University Health Ser- 
vices is to provide confidential medical/nursing 
care and educational programs to safeguard the 
physical well-being and mental health of the stu- 
dent body. The Department has two units: a 



Clinic located in Cushing Hall on the Chestnut 
Hill Campus, and a 20-bed Infirmary located in 
Keyes House South on the Newton Campus. 
Emergency service is also provided. 

Boston College requires that all undergradu- 
ate resident students be enrolled with the Univer- 
sity Health Services. A mandatory Health/Infir- 
mary fee is included on the tuition bill. Under- 
graduate students living off-campus who have 
been charged this fee may request a waiver from 
University Health Services Office in Cushing 
Hall in September. All students may have access 
to the facilities for first aid or in the case of an 
emergency. 

The Health/Infirmary Fee is specifically for 
medical care provided on campus by University 
Health Services and is not to be confused with 
medical insurance. Massachusetts law requires 
that all full-time students be covered by an Acci- 
dent & Sickness Insurance Policy so that complete 
protection may be assured in case of hospitaliza- 
tion or other cosdy outside medical services. (See 
Massachusetts Medical Insurance, above.) 

An informational brochure entitled Health 
Services Student Guide is available at University 
Health Services Office, Cushing Hall, Room 1 19. 
Insurance information can also be obtained there. 

Immunization 

Massachusetts State Law requires all college stu- 
dents born after 1956 to show evidence of satis- 
factory immunization against measles, mumps, 
rubella, tetanus and diphtheria. Students who fail 
to provide evidence of immunization may be pre- 
vented from registering and attending classes. 

Residence Accommodations 

Boston College offers several different types of 
undergraduate student housing in three different 
residence areas. Each area houses both male and 
female students. The building style and individual 
accommodations vary with the location and are 
described below: 

Lower Campus 

• Edmond's Hall Apartment Complex: The nine- 
story Edmond's Hall Apartment Complex, com- 
pleted in the fall of 1975, houses approximately 
795 male and female students in 200 two-bed- 
room apartments. Each apartment unit consists 
of two bedrooms, bath, dining area, kitchen and 
living room. These modern, completely fur- 
nished, apartment units house primarily upper- 
classmen. Subscription to the University Meal 
Plan is optional. 

• Ignacio and Rubinstein Apartment Complex: This 
air-conditioned apartment complex, completed in 
the spring of 1973, houses 725 students. Each 
completely furnished apartment unit includes two 
or three bedrooms, two baths, living room, din- 
ing area and kitchen. This area houses males and 
females, four or six per apartment, but is gener- 
ally restricted to juniors and seniors. Subscription 
to the University Meal Plan is optional. 

• Voute Hall and SO Commonwealth Avenue: These 
apartment-style residence halls were completed 
in the fall of 1988. Each two-bedroom apartment 
has a full kitchen, dining, and living room plus a 
full bath. 384 upperclassmen reside in these fully- 
furnished units. Seventeen townhouses are unique 
features of these halls. The buildings provide stu- 
dents with access to a variety of lounges equipped 



The University • Academic Regulations • 11 



for study and social uses, libraries and a weight 
room. Subscription to the University Meal Plan 
is optional. 

• Modular Apartment Complex: The Modular 
Complex consists of 80 duplex townhouse apart- 
ments. Completed in the spring of 1971, each air- 
conditioned and fully furnished apartment unit 
has three bedrooms, two and one-half baths, liv- 
ing room, and kitchen. This area houses both 
male and female students, six per apartment, but 
is generally restricted to seniors. Subscription to 
the University Meal Plan is optional. 

• Michael P. Walsh, S.J. Residence Hall: This suite- 
style residence hall, completed in the fall of 1 980, 
consists of four- and eight-person suites housing 
approximately 799 male and female students. 
Each eight-person suite has a furnished lounge 
area and includes a sink and counter space. Each 
floor of the residence hall has a separate lounge 
and study area. The facility also includes a 650- 
seat dining hall, a television lounge, a laundry 
room, and a fitness center. These units house pri- 
marily sophomores. Subscription to the Univer- 
sity Meal Plan is mandatory. 

• Sixty-Six Commonwealth Avenue is located on the 
Lower Campus. This upperclassman facility 
houses 144 students in predominantly single ac- 
commodations. Each room is fully furnished and 
additional lounge areas are provided on every 
floor. The building also has a chapel where weekly 
masses are conducted. Subscription to the Uni- 
versity Meal Plan is mandatory. 

Upper Campus Residence Halls 

These are standard residence halls with double 
and triple student rooms along a corridor. Each 
room is furnished with a bed, desk, dresser, chair, 
desk lamp, wastebasket and shades. These twelve 
buildings house approximately 1 50 students each, 
normally freshmen and sophomores. All Upper 
Campus residents are required to subscribe to the 
University Meal Plan. 

Newton Campus Residence Halls 

The six residence halls on the Newton Campus 
are similar to the Upper Campus halls and are fur- 
nished in the same manner. Daily free bus service 
is provided to the Chestnut Hill campus, which 
is located one mile from the Newton Campus. 
The Newton Campus offers a unique environ- 
ment and special academic and social programs 
which make it attractive to many freshman stu- 
dents. The University Meal Plan is mandatory for 
Newton Campus residents and a dining room and 
cafeteria are located on the campus, as well as a 
library and a chapel. 

Special Interest Housing 

The University offers a variety of Special Inter- 
est Housing options to undergraduate students. 
The Romance Language Hall, located on the Up- 
per Campus in Medeiros B, primarily houses stu- 
dents who want to improve their speaking knowl- 
edge of French and Spanish. 

Greycliff Honors House, located one-half mile 
from the main campus, houses 45 undergraduate 
students who are participating in the Honors Pro- 
gram. Faculty lectures, cultural and academic pro- 
grams are held in this residence hall throughout 
the year. 

The Multi-Cultural floor, open to students of 
all ethnic and racial backgrounds, will give resi- 



dents the opportunity to be introduced to and 
learn about various cultures. Students work to 
define and promote diversity within the hall and 
throughout the University through programmatic 
methods. 

The Substance Free floor allows students to re- 
side on an alcohol, drug, and tobacco free floor. 
Residents are required to plan and participate in 
a biweekly program/discussion and to sign a Sub- 
stance Free Living Agreement prior to moving in. 

Edmond's Hall ninth floor has been desig- 
nated as a 24-hour quiet living floor. Upperclass- 
men are able to reside in apartment-style accom- 
modations with a quiet atmosphere. Students are 
required to sign a Quiet Living Agreement prior 
to moving in. 

Upperclassmen interested in living in an at- 
mosphere that develops community and serves the 
greater Boston College campus reside together in 
apartment-style accommodations on the Com- 
munity Living Floor. Students meet once a week 
to plan service projects, retreats, and dinners. The 
community exists to help each member grow so- 
cially, intellectually, morally, and spiritually. 

Freshmen American students who want the 
experience of living with an International student 
are placed together on Intercultural Floors on the 
Newton and Upper Campuses. Cultural pro- 
gramming is concentrated around this interest. 
Resident Assistants are specially trained to meet 
the needs of these students. 

Off-Campus Housing 

The University operates an Off-Campus Hous- 
ing Office in Rubenstein Hall for the convenience 
of those seeking referrals for off-campus housing. 
The office maintains updated listings of apart- 
ments and rooms available for rental in areas sur- 
rounding the campus. Interested students should 
visit the office Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. 
to 5:00 p.m. From June 1 to September 1, the 
office is open Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. 
to 7:00 p.m.. Listings are available by mail. 

In addition to the stated facilities, the Univer- 
sity may lease additional facilities on a temporary 
basis if faced with a housing shortage in accom- 
modating students. 

University Counseling Services (UCS) 

UCS provides counseling and psychological ser- 
vices to the students of Boston College. The goal 
of UCS is to enable students to develop fully and 
to make the most of their educational experience. 
Services provided include individual counseling 
and psychotherapy, group counseling, consulta- 
tion, evaluation and referral. Students wishing to 
make an appointment may contact a counselor in 
any one of the Counseling Offices on campus 
(Gasson 108, 552-3310; Fulton 201, 552-3927; 
Campion 301, 552-4210). 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Note: In addition to being familiar with the Aca- 
demic Regulations and degree requirements in 
this University section of the Bulletin, students are 
expected to know the Academic Regulations and 
degree requirements of their own college printed 
on subsequent pages. Students should not rely on 
oral representations regarding academic regula- 
tions or degree requirements. Any questions re- 



garding degree requirements should be referred 
directly to the Office of the University Registrar. 

University Degree Requirements 

The requirement for the Bachelor's Degree in the 
undergraduate day colleges is the completion with 
satisfactory cumulative average (at least 1.5, with 
the exception of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
which requires a minimum average of 1.667) of 
at least 38 three-credit courses, or their equiva- 
lent, distributed over eight semesters of full-time 
academic work. In the summer, the University 
Registrar sends each undergraduate degree can- 
didate an evaluation of remaining degree require- 
ments. Core and major requirements stated in the 
Bulletin may, in exceptional circumstances, be 
waived or substituted by the student's Dean or 
major department. Such exceptions must be com- 
municated in writing to the Office of the Univer- 
sity Registrar. Acceleration of degree programs is 
possible in exceptional circumstances, provided 
Dean's approval is obtained at least two full se- 
mesters before early graduation and University 
policies governing acceleration are followed. 

University Core Requirements 

The minimum liberal education Core require- 
ments to be fulfilled by all undergraduate stu- 
dents, as administered by the Council on Liberal 
Education, over a four-year period, will be the 
following: 
2 in English 
2 in European History 
2 in either Natural Sciences or Mathematics 

2 in Social Sciences (Sociology, Political Science, 
Economics, Psychology and approved courses in 
the professional schools) 

2 in Philosophy 

2 in Theology 

For specific Core requirements in the individual 
schools in the University, students should consult 
the appropriate sections of this Catalog. 

Grading 

The grading system consists of twelve categories, 
as follows: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, 
D-, F. A is excellent; B is good; C is satisfactory; 
D is passing but unsatisfactory; F is failure. 

A student who has not completed the research 
or written work for a course taken in the fall or 
spring semester or is absent from the course ex- 
amination in either semester, may, with adequate 
reason and at the discretion of the instructor, re- 
ceive a temporary grade of Incomplete (I). All 
such "I" grades will automatically be changed to 
"F" after six weeks in the semester following the 
semester in which the course was taken. 

Students who are enrolled in a year-long 
course which is graded at the end of the year will 
receive a grade of "J" for the first semester. Stu- 
dents who withdraw from a course after the Drop/ 
Add period will receive a grade of "W." Neither 
of these grades is included in the calculation of the 
grade point average. 

With the approval of the Dean of their school 
or college, students may be permitted to take 
courses for enrichment. These courses are nor- 
mally taken in the summer. Courses approved for 
enrichment only may, with the approval of the 
relevant department, go toward fulfilling a Core, 
major, or minor requirement. However, grades 



12 • The Umyi rsity • Study Abroad Procrams 



tor courses taken tor enrichment are not com- 
puted into the cumulative average, and are not 
counted toward the total course or credit require- 
ment for graduation. 

In computing averages the following numeri- 
cal equivalents for the twelve (12) letter grades are 
used: 

A 4.00 C 2.00 F .00 

A- 3.67 C+ 2.33 

B+ 3.33 C- 1.67 

B 3.00 D+ 1.33 

B- 2.67 D 1.00 

D- .67 

A student's cumulative average is comprised of 
courses taken at Boston College, and does not 
include courses accepted in transfer. Information 
about a course failed remains on the student's 
record and 0.0 is still computed into averages even 
if the course is repeated with a passing grade; the 
later grade is also computed into averages. 

Grades will be mailed by the University 
Registrar's Office to each student shortly after the 
close of each semester. Any student who believes 
there is a grade discrepancy on a semester grade 
report should resolve the discrepancy within the 
first six weeks of the following semester. 

Academic Integrity 

Students at Boston College are expected to have 
high standards of integrity. Any student who 
cheats or plagiarizes on examinations or assign- 
ments is subject to dismissal from the College. 
Cases involving academic integrity shall be re- 
ferred to a Dean for adjudication or for judgment 
by an Administrative Board, as the student shall 
request. 

Academic Grievances 

Any student who believes he or she has been 
treated unfairly in academic matters should con- 
sult with the Chairperson of the Undergraduate 
Program or the Dean to discuss the situation and/ 
or to obtain information about relevant grievance 
procedures. 

The Dean's List 

The Dean's List recognizes the achievement of 
students semester by semester. The List classifies 
students in three groups according to semester 
averages: First Honors (3.700-4.000); Second 
Honors (3.500-3.699); Third Honors (3.300- 
3.499). In order to be eligible for Dean's List, stu- 
dents must also earn 12 or more credits and re- 
ceive a passing grade in all courses; students who 
have withdrawn or failed a course and students 
who have received an incomplete grade or a "J" 
grade (see Grading Scale section, above) will not 
be eligible for the Dean's List. 

Degree with Honors 

Latin honors accompanying the degrees of Bach- 
elor of Arts and Bachelor of Science are awarded 
in three grades. Summa cum Laude, with High- 
est Honors, is awarded to the top 4.5% of the 
graduating class; Magna cum Laude, with I Iigh 
I lonors, is awarded to the next 9.5%; and Cum 
Laude to the next 15%. These percentages are 
based on the student's eight-semester cumulative 
average. 

Absence from a Semester Examination 

Students will have to arrange for making up a 
semester examination which they have missed 



with the professor. Professors are asked to an- 
nounce the time and manner by which students 
must notify them of absence and make arrange- 
ments for taking the absentee examinations. If, in 
particular courses, announcements about absen- 
tee examinations are not made, students should 
ask the professors to specify the acceptable 
excuse(s) for absence and the manner and time of 
notification and of arrangements for the make-up 
examination. 

The only exception to the foregoing is the case 
where the student, because of an extended illness 
or serious injury, will miss all or most of his or her 
examinations and be unable to make up examina- 
tions for a week or more beyond the period sched- 
uled for semester examinations. In such cases, the 
student or his or her family should call the Office 
of the Associate Dean of his or her college as soon 
as the prospect of extended absence becomes 
clear. 

Student Absences for Religious 
Reasons 

Any student who is unable, because of his or her 
religious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate 
in any examination, study, or work requirement 
on a particular day, shall be excused from any such 
examination or study or work requirement, and 
shall be provided with an opportunity to make up 
such examination, study, or work requirement 
which may have been missed. However, such 
makeup examination or work shall not create an 
unreasonable burden upon the University. 

Transcript of Record 

A record of each student's academic work is pre- 
pared and maintained permanently by the Office 
of the University Registrar. While cumulative 
averages for academic majors are made available 
to students who are currently enrolled, these av- 
erages are not maintained as part of a student's 
permanent academic record. Only the student's 
final overall cumulative average appears on the 
permanent record (transcript). 

Transcript requests must be submitted in writ- 
ing to: Transcript Requests, Office of the Regis- 
trar, Lyons Hall 101, Boston College, Chestnut 
Hill, MA 02 167. 

Under normal conditions requests are pro- 
cessed within 72 hours of receipt. If rush service 
is required, a flat $5.00 "rush fee" will be assessed 
in addition to the cost of each transcript ($2.00 
per copy). University policy prohibits the issuance 
of partial transcripts. 

Transcript/Diploma Holds 

Diplomas will not be issued, nor transcript re- 
quests honored, for any student with an outstand- 
ing financial obligation to the University. The 
same policy applies to any student who does not 
complete the required loan exit interview. 

Transfers Within Boston College 

Matriculated students wishing to transfer from 
one undergraduate college to another within 
Boston College should contact the Dean's Office 
of the school to which admission is sought. Fresh- 
men should wait until late March to initiate this 
process; other classes usually make inquiries in 
late October or in late March. The college admin- 
istration involved in these procedures are: 



College of Arts and Sciences 

• Dean Green — Gasson 109B 

• Dean McHugh — Gasson 104 

• Dean O'Keeffe— Gasson 109 
School of Education 

• Dean Casey — Campion 104A 
Carroll School of Management 

• Dean Bowditch — Fulton 306B 
School of Nursing 

• Dean Munro — Gushing 203 

Withdrawal from a Course 

Students who withdraw from a course after the 
first five class days of the semester but before the 
last three weeks of class will have a "W" recorded 
in the grade column of their permanent record. 
Students will not be permitted to drop courses 
during the last three weeks of classes or during the 
exam period. Students who are still registered at 
this point will receive a final grade for the semes- 
ter. 

Withdrawal from Boston College 

Students ho wish to withdraw from Boston Col- 
lege in good standing are required to complete a 
Withdrawal Form and complete an exit interview 
in the University Registrar's Office. In the case 
of students who are dismissed for academic or 
disciplinary reasons, the appropriate college ad- 
ministrator will complete this form. 

Leave of Absence or Special Study 
Program 

Degree candidates seeking a leave of absence from 
Boston College are required to complete a Leave 
of Absence Form available in the University 
Registrar's Office. Students who take a leave of 
absence, subsequently decide to enroll at another 
college and then wish to reenter Boston College, 
must apply through Transfer Admission. 

To assure reenrollment for a particular semes- 
ter following leave of absence or participation in 
a special study program, students must notify the 
University Registrar's Office and the Dean's Of- 
fice of the college or school about their intention, 
at least six weeks in advance of the start of that 
semester. 

Readmission 

Students who desire readmission will initiate the 
process in the University Registrar's Office, 
Lyons Hall. Applications for readmission should 
be made there and at the Dean's Office of the 
school involved at least six weeks before the start 
of the semester in which the former student seeks 
to resume study. The appropriate Dean's Office 
will make the decision on the application and 
notify the former student about the action taken. 
The decision will be based on consideration of the 
best interests of both the student and the Univer- 
sity. 

STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS 

Foreign Study Program 

The Foreign Study Program at Boston College 
has steadily expanded since its inception with four 
students in 1959. In the early 1970s, approxi- 
mately 60 Boston College students went abroad 
annually to study, virtually all enrolled in full year 



The University • Special Programs • 13 



programs. During the 1992-93 academic year, 
300 students will study abroad either for one se- 
mester, for the full year, or in summer programs. 
Students begin the application process by contact- 
ing the Foreign Study Office early in their sopho- 
more year. 

With the exception of the Cork, Sophia, and 
Strasbourg programs, Boston College students 
currently attend foreign universities or study pro- 
grams sponsored through other American univer- 
sities or by independent organizations such as the 
Institute of European Studies. Students take a 
leave of absence for one semester or a full aca- 
demic year to study in Europe, Latin America, 
Africa, Australia, or Asia. The students pay tuition 
and fees to the other institution. Institutional 
financial aid does not presently go abroad. Grades 
are posted but not averaged into the students' 
cumulative average. For further information, con- 
tact Prof. Jeff Flagg, Foreign Study Office. 

Irish Studies at University College Cork 

The Irish Studies Program offers two study- 
abroad opportunities to Boston College under- 
graduates. 

The junior year Irish Studies Program at 
University College, Cork provides intensive ex- 
posure in areas of Irish culture not normally avail- 
able in the United States, such as Irish ethnogra- 
phy, folklore, and anthropology. Students com- 
pleting the year-long program receive two semes- 
ters of academic credit. Interested students should 
apply to the Foreign Study Office, and see Pro- 
fessors Dalsimer and O'Neill of the English and 
History Departments. 

Sophia University, Tokyo: Japan/Boston 
College Exchange 

Up to three students enrolled at Boston College 
may attend Sophia University, Tokyo. Students 
will have completed at least two years of univer- 
sity work prior to such enrollment. Preference is 
given to students who have studied Japanese. Par- 
ticipating students are enrolled on a full-time basis 
as non-degree students at the host university. 
Tuition is paid to Boston College, and room and 
board to Sophia. Grades received at Sophia are 
averaged into the students' cumulative average. 
For more information, contact Prof. Marian 
St. Onge, Director, Office of International Pro- 
grams, and the Foreign Study Office. 

Universite Robert Schuman: Strasbourg/ 
Boston College Exchange 

Beginning in the fall 1992 semester, four Boston 
College students may participate in a full-year 
exchange program with the University of 
Strasbourg, France. This program offers disci- 
pline-based study in Political Science, History and 
Economics, and is open to students who have 
completed two years of university work and have 
solid French language skills. The city of 
Strasbourg is at the center of the European Com- 
munity, and is the site of the European Parlia- 
ment, the Council of Europe, and the Human 
Rights Commission. 

Students who participate in the program pay 
regular BC tuition, earn full credit while in 
Strasbourg, and are eligible for all financial aid 
administered by Boston College. 

For more information, contact Prof. Marian 
St. Onge, Director, Office of International Pro- 
grams, and the Foreign Study Office. 



University of Nijmegen (Holland) Student 
Exchange 

This is a one-year exchange between the English 
Departments of the University of Nijmegen and 
Boston College for a Boston College junior ma- 
joring in English, and a Nijmegen graduate stu- 
dent. Nijmegen is a city of some 150,000 inhab- 
itants, located on the Rhine near the German 
border, and the university has 16,000 students, 
about 350-400 in the English Department. The 
Boston College student may attend both the un- 
dergraduate and graduate courses. All teaching in 
the department is done in English. 

For more information, contact Prof. Richard 
Hughes, English Department. 

Honors Program Junior Year Abroad: 
Manchester College; Mansfield College, 
University of Oxford, England 

Boston College offers students the opportunity to 
live and study in Oxford, England through pro- 
grams at Manchester College and Mansfield Col- 
lege. Students study at Oxford for a full year. In- 
terested students do not need to be in the A&S 
or CSOM Honors Programs to apply. Mansfield 
is one of the colleges and permanent private halls 
that constitute the University of Oxford. 
Manchester is not a constituent college of the 
University, but its students have most of the privi- 
leges of matriculated students and its system of 
tutorial instruction follows the traditional 
Oxbridge structure. 

Students attending Mansfield do not live at 
the college itself, but in houses leased by the col- 
lege on the outskirts of Oxford. All students may 
eat in the college dining hall and they all have use 
of the library and sports facilities of the college. 
The cost of the program includes tuition and 
housing, but not meals. Students attending 
Manchester live in the college and participate fully 
in the college life. 

For more information, contact Prof. Mark 
O'Connor, Honors Program, and the Foreign 
Study Office. 

Abbey Theatre Summer Program 

The Abbey Theatre Summer Program is a six- 
week summer workshop which consists of an in- 
tensive five weeks of classes, lectures, and dem- 
onstrations by members of the Abbey Theatre 
Company. Participants study acting, directing, 
production, management, and the history of the 
Irish theater, as well as staging an Irish play. A 
week of travel concludes the workshop. Students 
completing the program receive six credits of aca- 
demic credit. Interested students should contact 
Prof. Philip O'Leary, Tnglish Department. 

Boston/Hangzhou Summer Internship 
Exchange Program 

Boston College in cooperation with the Boston/ 
Hangzhou Sister City Association offers a six- 
week visit to Hangzhou, China. Five Boston Col- 
lege students, graduate and undergraduate, are 
selected for the visit, which includes a 4-week 
internship in Sino-Foreign joint ventures, one- 
week seminar with foreign trading companies, and 
one week of corporate visits and sight-seeing. Five 
members/managers from the Hangzhou Trade 
Commission come to Boston for internships and 
training. Students pay a program participation fee 
which covers the cost of room and pocket money 
during the six-week visit. 



For more information, contact Prof. Marian 
St. Onge, Director, Office of International Pro- 
grams, and the Foreign Study Office. 

Boston/Strasbourg Business Internship 
Exchange 

This program operates in cooperation with the 
Boston/Strasbourg Sister City Association. It is a 
reciprocal exchange which involves 1 5 students 
from Boston College and 15 students from the 
Business School of the University of Strasbourg, 
France. Each student works for six weeks in the 
host city. 

Students pay a program participation fee 
which covers the cost of room/board and pocket 
money during the six-week internship. Corporate 
contributions cover the balance of program costs. 
Course credit through the summer session is 
available to students pursuing summer research 
projects. 

For more information, Prof. Marian St. Onge, 
Director, Office of International Programs, and 
the Foreign Study Office. 

Summer Program in Belgium 

Boston College and the Departments of Econom- 
ics, Fine Arts, History, and Political Science of- 
fer a three-and-one-half-week summer program 
in association with the Irish Institute for European 
Affairs in Louvain (Leuven), Belgium. Professors 
in the three departments teach the course assisted 
by members of the European Economic Commu- 
nity (EEC) in Brussels, and visiting faculty from 
neighboring universities. Students have the op- 
portunity to interact with the cultural, social, and 
economic philosophies of our European neigh- 
bors. In addition, there is a Travel Component 
supervised by the Chairperson of the Fine Arts 
Department and a Foreign Language Component 
supervised by the Romance Languages Depart- 
ment. Students participating in the program earn 
three credits. Interested students should contact 
Katharine Hastings, Assistant to the Academic 
Vice President, Bourneuf House, x4779. 

Other Programs 

The Washington Semester Program 

This semester-long program is offered in coop- 
eration with American University in Washington, 
D.C. Students are housed at American Univer- 
sity and work in one of a number of government 
jobs arranged by the program's local directors. 
They also attend seminars and conduct a lengthy 
research project. Students completing this pro- 
gram receive one semester of academic credit. 
Interested students should contact Prof. Dennis 
Hale, Political Science Department. 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Cross Registration Program 

Under a program of cross-registration, sopho- 
mores, juniors and seniors may take in each se- 
mester one elective course at either Boston Uni- 
versity, Brandeis University, Hebrew College, 
Pine Manor College, Regis College or Tufts 
University if a similar course is not available at 
Boston College. A description of cross-registra- 
tion procedures and the authorization form are 
available in the University Registrar's Office, 
Lyons 101. 



14 • The University • Course Numbers and Codes 



The PULSE Program 

PULSE affords the Boston College undergradu- 
ate an opportunity to combine community-based 
held work with the study of Philosophy or The- 
ology. PULSE operates with the assumption that 
the community work provides an exciting point 
of departure for serious philosophical and theo- 
logical reflection. 

Through the combination of reflective, aca- 
demic work and field experience, the program 
encourages the student to form critical perspec- 
tives on societv, community and self. A student's 
experience — whether tutoring an IndoChinese 
refugee, advocating for an elderly person before 
a government agency or befriending an abused 
child — provokes some of the most basic philo- 
sophical and theological questions: "What does 
it mean to be a person? What constitutes justice 
for the poor and powerless? What does God call 
me to do?" 

Opportunities for field experience are avail- 
able in a variety of different neighborhoods and 
social service agencies. Included in the range of 
placements are crisis-counseling services, com- 
munity action groups, residences for retarded citi- 
zens, adolescent homes and after-school recre- 
ation programs. The placements aim at respond- 
ing to community needs while simultaneously 
providing a challenging opportunity for students 
to confront social problems. 

Supervision of student work includes on-site 
meetings with indigenous staff supplemented by 
meetings on campus with a student coordinator. 
PULSE thus provides three levels of direction and 
supervision for student work. (1) The PULSE 
Director has overall responsibility for the educa- 
tional goals and interests of PULSE students. In 
fulfilling that responsibility, the Director works 
as a consultant and advisor for both students and 
supervisors. (2) Each field project has a PULSE 
Council Coordinator, a student who is a member 
of the PULSE Council. (3) Each field project has 
an on-site Supervisor who, after an initial orien- 
tation session, meets regularly with students to 
provide information, direction and constructive 
feedback. 

Besides course work and supervision, PULSE 
sponsors films, slide shows, housing tours and 
workshops which are all designed to further en- 
hance a student's experience. Some recent work- 
shop topics have been Homelessness and Limit 
Setting. 

Students may participate in PULSE during 
any of their undergraduate years at Boston Col- 
lege. They may participate in the same project 
over several semesters or move on to projects 
treating different problems. Although classroom 
reflection is regarded as the key to the fullest pos- 
sible experience, students are allowed to work in 
projects without participation in a course. Credit, 
however, can only be made available to those stu- 
dents registered in PULSE courses. 

For details on PULSE courses, consult the 
listings of the Philosophy and Theology depart- 
ments. 



The Program for the Study of Faith, 
Peace and Justice 

This program offers students the opportunity to 
examine and intensify their faith commitments 
and to explore the significance of these commit- 
ments for the task of bringing about just and 
peaceful solutions to national and international 
problems. The Program sponsors courses, cam- 
pus events, and special activities for its partici- 
pants. 

Students who meet the academic require- 
ments of the Program (see the section on "Mi- 
nors" in the College of Arts and Sciences section 
of this Catalog) may minor in Faith, Peace and 
Justice Studies. Alternatively, students may 
choose to concentrate on faith, peace, and justice 
concerns within their major field. In either case 
the same pattern applies, namely, an introductory 
course (UN 160, The Challenge of Justice), four 
intermediate courses taken with the advice and 
consent of the Director, and, finally, UN 590, the 
Senior Seminar Project. 

Campus events include speakers, religious 
ceremonies, and student-faculty conferences and 
less formal exchanges on issues of faith, peace, and 
justice. Special activities for participants of the 
Program include retreats, evening discussion ses- 
sions with faculty, and a final dinner where seniors 
describe their projects to the juniors. 

For further information please contact Prof. 
James Rurak, Gasson 109, x3886. 

Reserve Officer Training Programs 

Army Reserve Officer Training Program 

In cooperation with Northeastern University, the 
Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) 
Program is offered to qualified Boston College 
students. Through the Extension Center at BC, 
a majority of the classes, drills and training are 
conducted on the BC campus. The Basic Course 
(freshman/sophomore) involves about two hours 
per week with no service obligation, while the 
Advanced Course (junior/senior) results in a sec- 
ond lieutenant's commission and a service obli- 
gation. 

Advanced Course students receive $100 per 
month while in school. ROTC Scholarships of 
four, three and two years are available to quali- 
fied students and include 80% of tuition, books, 
fees, and academic supplies, plus $100 per month 
while in school. For more details, contact the 
Department of Military Science Extension Cen- 
ter at Boston College (Carney Hall 25) atx3230, 
or refer questions to Associate Dean for Student 
Development Michael Ryan, x3470. 

Navy Reserve Officer Training Program 
This program is available only to students in 
the School of Nursing. Boston College students 
may cross enroll in Navy Reserve Officer Train- 
ing at Boston University. Two, three, and four 
year programs exist, and scholarships (all expenses 
except for room and board, with a $ 1 00 per school 
month stipend) are available for two, three, or four 
years for qualified students. All classes and drills 
are held at Boston University. Scholarship stu- 
dents incur a service obligation of four years' 
minimum active duty, while non-scholarship jun- 
iors and seniors incur a three-year active duty 
obligation. For further information, please con- 
tact Associate Dean for Student Development 



Michael Ryan, x3470, or the Department of Na- 
val Sciences, Boston University, 617-353-4232. 

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Program 

Through a new cross-enrolled program with 
Boston University, interested Boston College stu- 
dents may participate in the Air Force Reserve 
Officer Training Corps program. Scholarships 
(full and partial) are available to qualified students 
for four, three or two years and include tuition 
(full or partial), books, fees, and $100 per school 
month stipend. All training, drills and classes are 
held at the BU campus. Service obligations are 
one year for each scholarship year (active duty) 
while pilots are obligated for eight years' active 
duty after completion of flight school. To obtain 
further information, contact Associate Dean for 
Student Development Michael Ryan, x3470, or 
the Department of Aerospace Studies, Boston 
University, 617-353-4705. 

University Capstone Courses 

The University Capstone program offers several 
integrative seminars each semester for seniors and 
second-semester juniors in all schools. These 
seminars are intended to give students the oppor- 
tunity to relate their college experiences to their 
lives after college. The Capstone seminars address 
the struggle to integrate four crucial areas of life: 
work, relationships, free time, and the search for 
the purpose of existence. Capstone seminars are 
taught by faculty from various schools and depart- 
ments within Boston College, and are limited to 
15 to 20 students. For descriptions of the 
Capstone seminars offered in 1992-93, see the 
"University Courses" section of this Catalog. 

COURSE NUMBERS AND CODES 

The alphabetic prefix indicates the department or 
program offering the course. The number indi- 
cates the level of the course. 

000-299 — Courses for undergraduate registra- 
tion 

300-699 — Courses for undergraduate and gradu- 
ate registration. For Education courses, this range 
is 300-399 

700-999 — Courses for graduate registration 

(F: 3) or (S: 3) — A 3-credit course that will be of- 
fered either in the fall or in the spring. 

(F, S: 3) — One course which will be offered in the 
fall and in the spring, but may be taken only once 
for 3 credits. 

(F: 3-S: 3) — A two-semester course that can be 
taken both semesters for a total of 6 credits. 

Courses with no semester designation are not of- 
fered in 1992-93, but are taught by the depart- 
ment on a regular basis. 



College of Arts & Sciences • Academic Regulations 



is 



College of Arts and Sciences 



The College of Arts and Sciences confers the academic de- 
gree of either Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) or Bachelor of Sci- 
ence (B.S.), depending upon the candidate's major field. 
All degree programs within the college follow the liberal arts tradi- 
tion. 

Each student takes fourteen courses from the Core curriculum. 
These courses introduce a student to the variety of ways of interpret- 
ing the world and lead to a greater understanding of the methodolo- 
gies and content of the different disciplines. 

Each student selects a major, which is a systematic concentration 
of courses that develops an understanding in depth of a single aca- 
demic discipline or of an interdisciplinary topic. A student may choose 
more than one major, but in each must fulfill the minimum require- 
ments set by the department and the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Students are subject to the major requirements as published for the 
year in which they entered Boston College. 

The fields in which majors are available are: Art History, Biochem- 
istry, Biology, Chemistry, Classical Civilization, Classics, Commu- 
nication, Computer Science, Economics, English, Environmental 
Geosciences, Geology, Geophysics, Germanic Studies, Greek, His- 
tory, Latin, Linguistics, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, 
Political Science, Psychology, Romance Languages and Literatures, 
Russian, Slavic Studies, Sociology, Studio Art, Theater, and Theol- 
ogy. An Independent Major, involving courses from several depart- 
ments, is also available under certain conditions for students whose 
needs cannot be satisfied by the offerings of a single department. In 
addition, students with a special interest in certain interdisciplinary 
fields may complete a minor in these areas. 



ACADEMIC AND CAREER PLANNING 

Because of the great diversity of course offerings 
in the College of Arts and Sciences, it is impor- 
tant that each student exercise care, both in the 
selection of a major and in the selection of courses 
in the major, in the Core curriculum, and to ful- 
fill electives. It is also advisable that students, par- 
ticularly those with even a tentative interest in 
major fields (e.g. languages, sciences, mathemat- 
ics or art) which are structured and involve se- 
quences of courses, begin selection of their ma- 
jor and related courses at an early date. Students 
considering a career in medicine or dentistry 



should begin in the freshman year to fulfill the 
requirements for admission to professional 
schools in these areas. 

In a college as diverse as Arts and Sciences, the 
choices of courses and areas of concentration are 
so numerous that a student should avoid a simple 
or haphazard arrangement of program. To ensure 
a coherent, well-developed program students 
must meet with their faculty advisor before pre- 
registration for each semester. They should also 
broadly consult with other faculty, students, the 
Deans, the Premedical and Pre-Law advisors, the 



Counseling Office, and the Career Center. Po- 
tential employers and professionals outside the 
University can also help ensure that all academic- 
options have been considered and that plans are 
properly laid for meeting post-graduate objec- 
tives. 

It is not necessary, or even desirable, that a 
degree from the College of Arts and Sciences, by 
itself, provide all the training needed to perform 
a specific job. However, it should provide prepa- 
ration for graduate study in the major field or a 
related field. It should also furnish sufficient 
breadth of information and exposure to methods 
of inquiry so that, either alone or with additional 
training provided by the professional schools or 
employers, the student might effectively prepare 
for any one of a wide variety of careers, perhaps 
for one not foreseen while the student is in col- 
lege. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

These Academic Regulations are effective from 
September of the academic year printed on the 
cover and binding of this Catalog except where a 
different date is explicitly stated in a particular 
Regulation. If, after a student has withdrawn from 
Boston College, there have been changes in the 
Academic Regulations, and if the student is sub- 
sequently readmitted to the College, the Regula- 
tions in effect at the time of return apply. 

Each student is expected to know the Aca- 
demic Regulations presented below. 

Requirements for the Degree 

1 . 1 The requirement for the Bachelor's Degree 
is the completion, with satisfactory cumulative 
average (at least 1.667), of at least 38 one-semes- 
ter courses (each carrying a minimum of three 
semester-hour credits), normally distributed over 
eight semesters of four academic years. Within 
this requirement, all students must complete the 
14 course Core curriculum and a major of at least 
10 courses and must fulfill the language profi- 
ciency requirement. Thirty-two of the required 
38 courses must be in Departments of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. The remaining 6 
courses may be chosen from the offerings at the 
Boston College professional schools. 

1 .2 The following 14 courses comprise the Core 
curriculum and are required of all students: 

• 2 courses in English 

• 2 courses in History (European History) 

• 2 courses in Philosophy 

• 2 courses in Theology 

• 2 courses in Natural Science (Biology, 
Chemistry, Geology/Geophysics, Physics) 

• 2 courses in Social Science (Economics, 
Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology) 

and either: 2 courses in jMathematics or 1 course 
each in Fine Arts and in Communication & 
Theater 

Identification of the courses which will satisfy the 
Core in each department can be determined by 



16 • Com ege of Arts & Sciences • Academic Regulations 



contacting the department and by reference to 
each semester's CoRSS Booklet. 

1.3 All students in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences must before graduation demonstrate pro- 
ficiency at the intermediate level in a modern for- 
eign language or in a classical language. Profi- 
ciency may be demonstrated by a satisfactory- 
score on a standardized exam, by passing an exam 
administered by a Language Department, or by 
successful completion of the second semester of 
course work at the intermediate level or one se- 
mester above the intermediate level. Fulfillment 
of the proficiency requirement by examination 
does not confer course credit. 

1 .4 Each major within the College of Arts and 
Sciences requires at least 10 courses. No more 
than 12 courses for the major may be required 
from any one department. Two of these may be 
taken at the introductory level, at the discretion 
of the department. For the remainder of the 
courses, each department may designate specific 
courses or distribution requirements either within 
or outside the department to assure the desired 
coherence and structure of the major program. 

1.5 It is possible for a student to major in two 
fields, but for each major all requirements must 
be satisfied, and no course may count towards more 
than one major or towards a major and a minor. 

Normal Program, Overloads, 
Acceleration 

2 . 1 Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors are nor- 
mally required to carry five courses per semester; 
seniors, four courses per semester. Students who 
fail to complete the normal semester course load 
by failure, or withdrawal from a course, or by 
underloading, incur a course deficiency(cies). 
Non-seniors who wish to take only four courses 
in a semester may do so, but should consult with 
one of the Deans. Students should make up defi- 
ciencies as soon as possible (see 5.4). Full-time 
status for a student in any class requires enroll- 
ment in at least four courses in each semester. 

2.2 Tuition shall apply per semester as pub- 
lished even if a minimum full-time load or less is 
carried. 

2.3 All students wishing to enroll in a sixth 
course during a semester must receive a Dean's 
approval during the drop-add period. Approval 
will be given to the request of students who have 
earned in a full course load at least a 3.0 overall 
average or a 3.0 average in the semester immedi- 
ately prior to the one for which the overload is 
sought. Students whose averages are between 2.0 
and 3.0 may, under exceptional circumstances, be 
allowed by a Dean to enroll in a sixth course. Stu- 
dents who obtain Dean's approval to overload 
should register for the sixth course during the 
Drop/Add period, and must notify the Dean by 
the sixth week of classes whether they wish to drop 
the course or keep it for credit. Students are not 
permitted to take a sixth course in their first se- 
mester at Boston College. 

All students taking a sixth 3-credit course for 
acceleration will be charged at the prevailing 
credit-hour rate. 

2.4 The only courses which a student, after ad- 
mission to Boston College, may apply towards an 
Arts and Sciences degree (whether for Core, ma- 



jor, or total course requirements) will be those 
taken at Boston College in a regular course of 
study during the academic year. The Deans of the 
College of Arts and Sciences are authorized to 
grant exceptions to the provisions of this regula- 
tion for the following situations: 

• official cross-registration programs; 

• the Foreign Study Program; 

• official college exchange programs; 

• special study programs at an academic institu- 
tion other than Boston College; 

• subject to certain restrictions, courses in the 
Evening College of Arts and Sciences and Busi- 
ness Administration. 

• courses approved to make up deficiencies as 
specified in 5.4 

For any of the above exceptions, students must 
obtain in advance written approval from a Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

2.5 After being in residence for at least three se- 
mesters, and at least two full semesters prior to 
the proposed date of graduation, students may 
apply to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences (Gasson 103) to accelerate their degree pro- 
gram by one or two semesters. Students must 
present a minimum cumulative average of 3.2; 
they will be considered for approval only for ex- 
ceptional reasons. In accordance with University 
policies governing accelerated programs of study, 
the following will also be applicable: 

1 . Summer courses intended for acceleration must 
be taken at Boston College and must be autho- 
rized in advance by a Dean. 

2. Overload courses taken for acceleration will 
carry an extra tuition charge. This includes fifth 
courses taken during senior year. 

3. Students transferring into Boston College with 
first semester sophomore status or above are not 
eligible to accelerate their program of study. 

Pass/Fail Electives 

3.1 Non-freshmen are eligible to enroll in a 
course on a Pass/Fail basis. Approval must be 
obtained from an Arts and Sciences Dean during 
the registration or Drop/ Add periods. 

3 .2 No student may take more than 6 Pass/Fail 
courses for credit towards a degree. 

3.3 Courses taken to fulfill Core or major re- 
quirements and any language courses taken be- 
fore the language proficiency requirement is ful- 
filled may not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. 

Fulfillment of Requirements by 
Equivalencies 

4. 1 In the following circumstances, departments 
may rule that specific degree requirements may 
be met by equivalencies for certain courses: 

a. At any time before the senior year, a stu- 
dent may be exempted from taking courses in a 
Core area. Such exemptions will be based on 
equivalency examinations in which the student 
demonstrates, to the satisfaction of the chairper- 
son of the department concerned, a mastery of the 
content of such course(s). Exemptions do not 
carry grade or credit. 

b. Certain departments offer and identify full- 
year courses whose second semester content 
builds upon the material covered in first semes- 
ter. For this reason, a student who fails the first 
semester of such a course should seriously con- 



sider whether it is advisable to continue in the 
second semester. However, a student may, with 
the approval of a Dean, be allowed to continue in 
the course. A second semester grade of C+ or 
better will entitle the student to credit and a grade 
of D- for the first semester of the course. This 
regulation may be applied also to Pass/Fail elec- 
tives in a two-semester offering provided both 
semesters are taken Pass/Fail. The grade of Pass, 
rather than D-, will be awarded for the first se- 
mester in such cases. A list of departments and 
courses where this regulation applies is on file in 
the Dean's Office. 

Academic Standards 

5.1 It is expected that a student will pass five 
courses each semester for the first three years and 
four courses each semester senior year. Students 
who do not meet these expectations because of 
failure, withdrawal or underload will incur course 
deficiency(ies). In order to remain in the College 
a student must maintain a cumulative average of 
at least 1.5 for the first five semesters and have a 
cumulative average of 1.667 in order to begin 
senior year and to graduate. 

5.2 A student who has incurred three or more 
deficiencies will be required to withdraw from the 
College at the end of the semester in which the 
student has incurred the third deficiency. A stu- 
dent whose cumulative average falls below 2.0 or 
who incurs two deficiencies is automatically on 
academic warning. The Deans of the College shall 
notify any student on academic warning and re- 
quire that student to obtain appropriate academic 
advice. 

5.3 A student who has been required to with- 
draw because of three or more deficiencies may 
be eligible for readmission. To be eligible for re- 
turn a student must fulfill the conditions specified 
by the Dean's letter of withdrawal. This will or- 
dinarily include the reduction of deficiencies and 
the attainment of a minimum grade point aver- 
age. A student who fails to fulfill the specified con- 
ditions will not be allowed to return to the Col- 
lege. 

5.4 A student who by failure, withdrawal or 
underload lacks the number of courses required 
by his or her status must make up the deficien- 
cies. Students who transfer to Boston College 
with fewer courses credited than required for the 
status assigned by the Admissions Office must 
make up these deficiencies in order to graduate 
as scheduled. Deficiencies may be made up by 
taking courses in the summer session or part-time 
division of Boston College or another accredited 
4-year college. All such courses must be approved 
beforehand by an Arts and Sciences Dean and the 
student must earn a minimum grade of C-. With 
special permission, a student may make up defi- 
ciencies by passing additional courses at Boston 
College in a regular academic year. A deficiency 
should be made up as soon as possible after it has 
been incurred. 

5.5 No more than three approved 3-credit 
courses or their equivalent from any one summer 
will be accepted to make up deficiencies. No more 
than eight approved 3-credit make-up courses or 
their equivalent will be accepted for degree credit. 



College of Arts & Sciences • Academic Regulations • 17 



5.6 Appeals on matters of fact involved in re- 
quired withdrawal or readmission are to be made 
to the Associate Deans; their decision, after review 
of such matters, when unanimous is final. Appeals 
on matters of fact where the decision of the As- 
sociate Deans on review is by split vote and ap- 
peals on questions of interpretation of the regu- 
lations involved in required withdrawal or 
readmission may be carried to the Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences for final adjudication. 

Course Requirements 

6.1 Students are expected to attend class regu- 
larly, take tests and submit papers and other work 
at the times specified in the course syllabus by the 
professor. A student who is absent from class on 
the day of a previously announced test or assign- 
ment is not entitled, as a matter of right, to make 
up what was missed. Professors may include, as 
part of the semester's grades, marks for the qual- 
ity and quantity of the student's participation in 
class. 

6.2 A student who must miss class for an ex- 
tended period of time (a week or more) should 
bring documentation of the difficulty to the class 
Dean. The Dean will notify course instructors of 
the reasons for a student's absences and request 
reasonable consideration in making up work that 
has been missed, but final arrangements for com- 
pleting course work are entirely at the discretion 
of the course instructor. 

There are situations where a student misses 
too much work and too many classes to be able 
to complete the course satisfactorily. In such cases, 
it is advisable to withdraw. 

6.3 Students are responsible for taking all tests, 
quizzes, and examinations when they are given 
and have no automatic right to be given a make- 
up examination. They are also responsible for 
submitting all written work for a course to the 
instructor by the published deadline. Professors 
are not obliged to accept any work beyond the 
deadline or to grant extensions. 

Leave of Absence 

7.1 A student in good standing who desires to 
interrupt the normal progress of an academic pro- 
gram and to resume studies at Boston College 
within a year may petition for a leave of absence. 
The process begins in the Associate Dean's Of- 
fice. A leave of absence will not normally be 
granted to students who expect to do full-time 
academic work at other institutions, and will usu- 
ally last for no more than one year, although pe- 
tition for extension is possible. 

Academic Honesty 

8.1 The College expects all students to adhere 
to the accepted norms of intellectual honesty in 
their academic work. Any form of cheating, pla- 
giarism, or dishonesty, or collusion in another's 
dishonesty is a fundamental violation of these 
norms. It is the student's responsibility to under- 
stand and abide by these standards of academic 
honesty. 

Cheating is the use or attempted use of unau- 
thorized aids in any exam or other academic ex- 
ercise submitted for evaluation. This includes data 
falsification; the fabrication of data; deceitful al- 
teration of collected data included in a report; 
copying from another student's work; unautho- 



rized cooperation in doing assignments or during 
an examination; the use of purchased essays or 
term papers, or preparatory research for such 
papers; submission of the same written work in 
more than one course without prior written ap- 
proval from the instructor(s) involved; and dis- 
honesty in requests for either extensions on pa- 
pers or make-up examination. Plagiarism is the 
deliberate act of taking the words, ideas, data, il- 
lustrative material, or statements of someone else, 
without full and proper acknowledgment, and 
presenting them as one's own. Collusion is assist- 
ing or attempting to assist another student in an 
act of academic dishonesty. 

As part of their scholarly development, stu- 
dents must learn how to work cooperatively in a 
community of scholars and how to make fruitful 
use of the work of others without violating the 
norms of intellectual honesty. They have a re- 
sponsibility to learn the parameters of collabora- 
tion and the proper forms for quoting, summa- 
rizing, and paraphrasing. Faculty advisors and 
other faculty members can give additional infor- 
mation and instruction in this area. 

A faculty member who detects any form of 
academic dishonesty has a responsibility to take 
appropriate action. The faculty member also has 
the responsibility to report the incident and pen- 
alty to the Department Chairperson and to the 
appropriate class Dean. The report will remain in 
the student's file in the Dean's office until the file 
is destroyed. 

If the gravity of the offense seems to warrant 
it or if the faculty member prefers that another 
academic authority decide the matter, he/she may 
refer the case to a Dean. In addition, if the stu- 
dent feels that a faculty member's decision is un- 
fair or excessive, he/she may choose to have the 
matter adjudicated by an Associate Dean or by an 
Administrative Board. 

8.2 If an Associate Dean adjudicates the matter, 
he/she will interview the student, the faculty 
member bringing the charge and other appropri- 
ate persons and review all the evidence submit- 
ted by the student and/or faculty member. Any 
appeal from the decision of an Associate Dean 
shall be to the Dean of the College. The student 
must file this appeal in written form within 10 days 
of the date of the Associate Dean's decision. The 
decision of the Dean is final. 

8.3 An Administrative Board shall be composed 
of three people from the College, i.e., an Associ- 
ate Dean, a full-time faculty member, and a stu- 
dent. The faculty member shall be selected by the 
Dean from a list of six faculty members designated 
annually for this purpose by the Educational 
Policy Committee. The student member shall be 
selected by the Dean from a list of six A&S stu- 
dents designated annually for this purpose by the 
student members of the Educational Policy Com- 
mittee. 

A student coming before an Administrative 
Board shall have the right to exercise two chal- 
lenges without cause against the student and/or 
faculty appointees to the Board. 

The Board shall submit its recommendations 
to the Dean of the College who shall review the 
report, make a final determination and commu- 
nicate the decision to the student. The decision 
of the Dean is final. 



Procedure of Appeal 

9.1 Students with questions of interpretation or 
petitions for exception from these Regulations, 
apart from those specified in 5.5 above, may sub- 
mit them to an Appeals Board appointed by the 
Educational Policy Committee. 

9.2 A student should resolve problems on the 
manner in which grades have been awarded or on 
the academic practices of an instructor by direct 
and immediate contact with the instructor. In the 
rare case of an unresolved question the student 
should first refer the matter in an informal man- 
ner to the chairperson or director of the appro- 
priate department or program. 

9.3 A formal appeal of a course grade, which 
ought not be entered lightly by a student nor 
lighdy dismissed by an instructor, should be made 
no later than the sixth week of the following se- 
mester. In making a formal appeal a student files 
a written statement with the department chairper- 
son or program director and thereafter the appeal 
is handled in accordance with guidelines approved 
by the Educational Policy Committee of the Col- 
lege. Current guidelines are available at the Of- 
fice of the Dean. 

Internal Transfers into Arts and Sciences 

1 0. 1 Students in the schools of Education, Man- 
agement and Nursing may apply for transfer to 
the College of Arts and Sciences at the end of their 
freshman year. 

10.2 Students transferring into the College of 
Arts and Sciences will ordinarily be expected to 
have a cumulative average of at least 3.0 and no 
deficiencies. All students must complete at least 
3 semesters of full-time study in A&S after the 
transfer; previous enrollment in A&S courses will 
not satisfy this requirement nor will study abroad 
or other special study programs. 

Grade Change 

11.1 Grades submitted by faculty at the end of 
each semester are considered final grades unless 
the faculty member has granted a student an ex- 
tension to finish course work. Such extensions 
should only be granted for serious reasons, e.g. 
illness. Any other grade changes should be made 
only for exceptional reasons. All grade changes, 
including those for extensions, must be submit- 
ted to the Deans for approval no later than 6 
weeks after the beginning of the semester follow- 
ing that in which the course was initiated. Incom- 
plete grades which are not changed within the 6- 
week deadline will become F's and will be con- 
sidered final grades. 

Degree with Honors 

Latin honors accompanying the degrees of Bach- 
elor of Arts and Bachelor of Science are awarded 
in three grades: Summa Cum Laude, with High- 
est Honors, is awarded to the top 4.5% of the 
graduating class; Magna Cum Laude, with High 
Honors, is awarded to the next 9.5% and Cum 
Laude to the next 15%. The percentages are 
based on the student's 8-semester cumulative av- 
erage. 



18 



Coi.i i c.i of Arts & Sciences • Special Academic Programs 



SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

The Honors Program 

The Honors Program offers gifted students a 
more integrated and comprehensive liberal arts 
curriculum as an alternative to the regular under- 
graduate Core. About seven percent of entering 
A&S freshmen are invited to join the program 
each year, on the basis of their high-school 
records, recommendations of teachers, and SAT 
scores. Occasionally other students whose perfor- 
mance in freshman year warrants it may be con- 
sidered for admission to the Honors Program for 
sophomore year. They should inquire during sec- 
ond semester at the office in Gasson 102. In or- 
der to remain in the program students must or- 
dinarily maintain a GPA of at least 3.33. 

Students in the Honors Program complete a 
major in one of the regular A&S departments. In 
addition they must satisfy the following Honors 
Program requirements: 

Western Cultural Tradition 1- VIII: In freshman 
and sophomore year students are required to take 
this intensive course, for six credits each semes- 
ter (a total of 24 credits). It substitutes for the 
normal Core requirements in Theology, Philoso- 
phy, English, and (for non-majors) Social Science. 
The content is the great books of the tradition 
studied in roughly chronological sequence: in 
freshman year Greek and Roman thought, the 
Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, and me- 
dieval culture. In sophomore year the course 
moves from the Renaissance to the 20th century. 
Primary emphasis is on the texts, i.e., this is not a 
survey course. Each section has approximately 1 5 
students, and is conducted as a seminar. Atten- 
dance at class and active participation in discus- 
sion are required. There are frequent paper as- 
signments. 

Junior Honors Seminar: In their junior year 
students take at least one of a number of specially 
designated seminars, which focus in depth on sa- 
lient topics or unfinished questions from the ma- 
terial of the Western Cultural Tradition course. 

Honors Thesis: Seniors are required to write an 
honors thesis (unless they do a Scholar of the 
College project) under the direction of a faculty 
member in any department of the university. The 
thesis is ordinarily done for six credits and extends 
through both semesters of senior year. 

Only students who have fulfilled these re- 
quirements satisfactorily and achieved a GPA of 
3.3 or higher will have on their permanent records 
the designation that they have "completed the 
requirements of the A&S Honors Program." 

Scholar of the College 

The Scholar of the College Program aims at rec- 
ognizing, encouraging and challenging superior 
scholarly and creative ability. In senior year the 
candidates carry one or two upper division elec- 
tives while engaged in a Scholar's Project (an 
unusually scholarly or creative piece of work) 
under the direction of a faculty member. Candi- 
dacy in the Scholar of the College Program is 
extended to juniors with a 3.3 average who have 
demonstrated exceptional achievement, maturity, 
scholarly interest or creative skill and have been 
nominated by the chairperson of the appropriate 
department and selected by the Dean of the Col- 
lege ol Arts and Sciences. Application for candi- 



dacy, an oudine of the proposed project and nomi- 
nations must be submitted to the Dean by mid- 
November of the junior year if the student is a 
January graduate and mid-April of the junior year 
if the student is a May graduate. Upon satisfac- 
tory completion of the Scholar's Project, the can- 
didate is given the distinction of Scholar of the 
College at commencement in May. 

Departmental Honors 

The designation of departmental honors is re- 
served for above-average students who have dem- 
onstrated academic achievement in additional or 
more difficult courses, or by successfully under- 
taking an approved research project, as deter- 
mined by each department. 

Independent Major 

While under normal circumstances students are 
advised to follow the formal educational programs 
offered by the departments, in rare instances, for 
those students with special interests or needs 
which cannot be satisfied in a regular major, or 
double major, the Educational Policy Commit- 
tee will approve an extra-departmental major 
called an Independent Major. A student who 
wishes an Independent Major must plan, with the 
aid of a faculty advisor, a program involving at 
least twelve upper division courses, normally ex- 
tending over no more than three departments, 
and selected in accordance with a clearly defined 
unifying principle. This program should be equal 
in depth and coherence to a typical departmental 
major. Each proposed major should be submit- 
ted in writing to the Dean's office before the end 
of a student's sophomore year. The Dean will 
then present it to the Educational Policy Com- 
mittee for approval. An Independent Major must 
ordinarily be the student's only major. 

Bachelor of Arts-Master of Social 
Work Program 

The College of Arts and Sciences and the Gradu- 
ate School of Social Work offer a joint degree 
program for a limited number of undergraduate 
psychology and sociology majors. During the 
sophomore year interested students take two pre- 
requisites (Statistics and Introduction to Social 
Welfare) and apply for formal acceptance in the 
Program. They must meet all standard require- 
ments for admission to the Graduate School of 
Social Work and complete all its foundation 
courses by the end of the senior year, at which 
time they receive the B.A. degree. They then 
enroll as Second Year M.S.W. candidates for their 
fifth and final year. Further information may be 
obtained from the Graduate School of Social 
Work Admissions Office, McGuinn 135, the 
Departments of Psychology and Sociology (Mc- 
Guinn), and the Dean's Office (Gasson 109). 

Bachelor's-Master's Program in Arts 
and Sciences 

This is a four-year program offered in conjunc- 
tion with the Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences for students who have at least a 3.3 average 
and who have demonstrated to an exceptional 
degree maturity, ability to work independently 
and knowledge of their chosen field. Under this 
program a student will, upon satisfying the re- 
quirements of both undergraduate and graduate 
schools, be awarded Bachelor's and Master's de- 
grees. Students interested in applying to this Pro- 



gram must present to the Dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences by the end of the sophomore 
year a formal proposal written in consultation 
with the department chairperson and a graduate 
faculty advisor in the intended major area. Admis- 
sion to the Program is recommended by the Dean 
to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences af- 
ter an appraisal of the applicant by the Dean's 
committee of advisors. Such recommendation will 
depend on overall excellence in the student's un- 
dergraduate record and exceptional performance 
in the undergraduate major. 

Further details regarding the.proposal format 
and overall Program requirements may be ob- 
tained from A&S Department offices or the Of- 
fice of the Dean. 

Minors in the School of Education for 
Students in Arts and Sciences 

Arts and Sciences students completing minors in 
the School of Education must fulfill all major, 
Core, and elective requirements in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and have credit in at least 32 
Arts and Sciences courses. 

Secondary Education 

Students majoring in Biology, Chemistry, En- 
glish, Foreign Language, History, Mathematics, 
Geology, Physics, or Theology {not for certifica- 
tion) in the College of Arts and Sciences may 
apply to minor in Education. This program be- 
gins in the junior year and interested students 
should contact the Coordinator of Secondary 
Education or the Associate Dean in the School of 
Education during the second semester in the 
sophomore year. Only those students majoring in 
the disciplines listed above may apply for a mi- 
nor in Secondary Education. 

N.B. Students majoring in English have ad- 
ditional requirements. Consult the Secondary 
Handbook and the advisor for these require- 
ments. 

General Education 

Students who have an interest in Education may 
follow a minor of five or six courses with their 
advisors' approval. This program does not lead to 
certification but does offer students an introduc- 
tion to programs that could be pursued on the 
graduate level. The following courses constitute 
a minor in Education: Child Growth and Devel- 
opment, Family, School, and Society, Psychology 
of Learning, Classroom Assessment, Working 
with Special Needs Children, Early Childhood 
Development. 

Programs in Computer Science 

There are three courses of study in computer sci- 
ence open to qualified students. Arts and Sciences 
students may either major, minor, or take a con- 
centration in computer science. The major and 
minor programs are described in the College of 
Arts and Sciences section of this Catalog under 
"Computer Science"; the concentration program 
is described under "Computer Science" in the 
Carroll School of Management section. 

Premedical/Predental Program 

The Premedical/Predental Program at Boston 
College is not an academic major, but rather a 
program of study and system of advising designed 
to help students consider carefully the various 
career opportunities in the health professions, 



College of Arts and Sciences • Minors • 19 



guide their academic preparation, and assist them 
in securing admission to medical and dental 
schools and other graduate programs in the health 
professions. The program is overseen by a faculty 
Advising Committee and is directed by the Pre- 
medical/Predental Advisor. 

Medical and dental schools clearly prefer ap- 
plicants who have excelled in a particular field of 
study while demonstrating a high degree of ex- 
cellence in the basic sciences. A premedical or 
predental student at Boston College may there- 
fore select a major in any of the natural or social 
sciences or humanities. He or she, however, is also 
expected to take one full year of each of the four 
basic introductory laboratory sciences (General 
Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Biology, and 
Physics) and pursue a liberal education within the 
context of the College's Core requirements. Many 
medical schools also recommend that applicants 
include one year of Calculus and at least some 
upper-level science courses among their electives. 
Dental schools in particular, are interested in stu- 
dents with a diversified program of study in both 
the sciences and the humanities. 

Application to medical or dental schools is 
normally made in the summer before the begin- 
ning of senior year. Since the Medical College 
Admission Test (MCAT) or the Dental Admis- 
sion Test (DAT) and all required course work 
must be completed before application, it is 
strongly recommended that all the required 
courses in science and mathematics be completed 
by the end of the junior year. A basic program of 
study for a premedical or predental student in- 
cludes General Chemistry, Biology, and Calcu- 
lus freshman year; Organic Chemistry sophomore 
year; and Physics junior year. Other program se- 
quences are acceptable, however, and may be bet- 
ter suited to a particular student's interests and 
preparation. These options should be discussed 
with the Premedical/Predental Advisor. 

While the competition for places in dental 
schools is not as keen as that for medical schools, 
applicants to either of the professional schools 
must be concerned with presenting the strongest 
possible credentials for admission. Premedical and 
predental students must therefore be prepared to 
continually evaluate their interests and achieve- 
ments. Some may wish to consider other career 
opportunities within the health professions and in 
other areas. 

There are a wide variety of academic routes 
to medical or dental school. Applicants with 
slightly lower grades in unusually challenging 
programs of study are at least as attractive to 
medical and dental schools as those with strong 
grades in less demanding programs. Therefore, 
all premedical and predental students, particularly 
those who are concerned about their credentials 
and interested in ways of improving them, should 
consult closely with the Premedical/Predental 
Advisor throughout their undergraduate years. 
Further information can be obtained from the 
Premedical Advisor, Dr. Robert Wolff, Higgins 
610, (x4663). 

Foreign Study 

The aim of the Foreign Study Program is to en- 
able students to become fluent in a foreign lan- 
guage and understand better a different culture. 
Students wishing to spend a year or a semester 



abroad and transfer the credits earned to their 
Boston College degree must receive approval 
from a Dean and enroll in a program approved 
by the College. To qualify for Dean's approval, a 
student must 1) have a 3.0 average in the major 
and approximately the same in general average, 
2) have completed a significant number of courses 
in the major and have made substantial progress 
on core requirements, 3) have the approval of the 
chairperson of the major department, and 4) have 
adequate proficiency in the language of the coun- 
try in which he/she plans to study. 

Students should begin the application process 
by contacting the Foreign Study Office (Gasson 
106) early in their sophomore year. Final approval 
will be given by the Deans on the basis of a 
student's academic record at the end of sopho- 
more year. 

Interdisciplinary Programs 

In addition to the areas of major study offered by 
individual departments, a variety of special pro- 
grams are available. While no one of these is to 
be assumed a major, it is possible, in some of them, 
to develop a major or minor program; all of them 
are designed to provide a coherent grouping of 
courses drawn from various disciplines and fo- 
cused around a specific theme. Through such 
programs, a student can integrate or enrich an 
academic program, even if it is not a major. 

MINORS 

A minor in the College of Arts and Sciences must: 
consist of six courses; contain a required course 
of an introductory nature; aim for some kind of 
coherent shape appropriate to the subject matter 
and offer the student courses which give him or 
her a sense of definite movement — from a begin- 
ning to a middle and an end, from introductory 
to advanced levels, from general treatments to 
specialized treatments, etc. Courses counted to- 
ward a major may not also count toward a minor. 
No more than one Core course taken as part of a 
minor can also be counted as part of the College 
Core requirement. Students who are double ma- 
joring may not minor and no student may have 
two minors. In the case of interdisciplinary mi- 
nors, the student's program must include courses 
from three A&S departments. 

Each minor will be administered by a commit- 
tee, consisting of a Chairperson appointed by the 
Dean, and members who serve at the will of the 
Chair. One important function of this commit- 
tee is the advising of students enrolled in the mi- 
nor. 

With the exception of the restrictions noted 
above, minors are open to all Arts and Sciences 
students and the courses prescribed by the re- 
quirements of the minor must be accessible to the 
students. Further information can be found in the 
individual program descriptions below. 

American Studies 

American Studies is an interdisciplinary program 
created by the departments of English, Fine Arts, 
History, Political Science, and Sociology to ex- 
pose students to a wide range of approaches to 
American culture. Students are encouraged, with 
faculty advisement, to design a minor program 
which can either contribute to their major or pro- 
vide a separate area of study altogether. 



The American Studies minor consists of three 
levels. Students shall, prior to the end of the fall 
semester of their junior year, take two semesters 
of an introductory sequence outside their major. 
The following sequences will be accepted: 1) 2 
semesters of either Major American Writers I, II, 
or III (EN 141-142-143); 2) American Civiliza- 
tion I & II (HS 181-182); 3) The Arts in America 
(FA 263-264), or The Arts in America (FA 263) 
and American Architecture (FA 267) (possible 
substitute: Art Since 1945 (FA 356); 4) or the fol- 
lowing combined sequence: Social Problems (SC 
049) and either: Politics and Government in 
America (PO 024) or The American National 
Government (PO 302) or American Political 
Thought (PO 609). 

Then, in his or her senior year, each student 
will take one course, designated in the previous 
year as the American Studies seminar. This course 
will be interdisciplinary in nature. In the event 
that enrollment in the Minor is high, more than 
one course may be so designated. In 1992-93, the 
seminar will be EN 626, American Culture in 
Contemporary Nonfiction, taught in the fall of 
1992 by Prof. Wilson of the English Department. 

Finally, in his or her junior and senior years, 
each student shall take three courses, again out- 
side the major, and in at least two departments, 
which constitute some area of focus within the 
study of American culture. Possible headings 
under which courses could be grouped include: 
The Culture of Boston; Gender and Society; 
Immigration and Ethnicity; and American Mod- 
ernism. 

For further information on the American 
Studies minor, and application forms, see Prof. 
Christopher Wilson, Carney 349 (x3719), Prof. 
James Wallace, Carney 453 (x37 12), or Prof. Ju- 
dith Smith, Hovey House (x8456). 

Asian Studies 

The Asian Studies program enables a student to 
study the language, history and culture of the Far 
East from a number of disciplinary perspectives. 
The student may select appropriate courses from 
the offerings of several departments, may design 
an Independent Major, or may complete an Asian 
Studies minor. 

The requirements for the latter are as follows: 
1)2 courses in Chinese/Japanese language beyond 
elementary level, 2) 1 course in Asian history, 3) 
1 additional course in Asian history or one course 
in Asian politics or diplomacy, 4) 2 approved elec- 
tive courses from two of the following areas: Art 
History (FA), Philosophy (PL), Theology (TH), 
Political Science (PO), Literature or a second 
Asian language (SL), and 5) senior research pa- 
per, directed, on an approved topic. 

Substitutions for specific requirements of the 
normal program and the application of cross-reg- 
istered courses from neighboring institutions re- 
quire express permission, in advance, from the 
Asian Studies Committee. The Committee will 
not permit courses being used for a major to ap- 
ply also to the Asian Studies minor. 

Further information is available from the Di- 
rector, Prof. Michael Connolly, Slavic and East- 
ern Languages Department, Carney 236 (x3912). 



20 • Col LEGE OF ARTS & SctFXCFS • MINORS 



Biblical Studies 

The minor provides a special concentration in 
Bible for students who wish to gain knowledge of 
the biblical texts, of the world out of which the 
Bible came, and of the methods used in modern 
studv of the Bible. The minor consists of six 
courses to be distributed as follows: 1) two intro- 
ductory level courses (Core level): one an intro- 
duction to Hebrew Scriptures and one an intro- 
duction to the New Testament; 2) two upper level 
(level two and three) courses in the interpretation 
of particular books of the Bible or in special top- 
ics; and 3) two elective courses, including courses 
in biblical languages, archaeology, and ancient 
history. 

For more information contact Prof. Donald 
Dietrich, Theology Department, Carney 409 
(x3883). 

Black Studies 

Black Studies at Boston College is an interdisci- 
plinary program which offers or cosponsors 
courses in several disciplines. Through courses in 
history-, literature, sociology, philosophy, theol- 
ogy, and the arts students may pursue a variety of 
approaches to understanding the black experi- 
ence. 

The minor in Black Studies requires six 
courses, to be distributed over three departments. 
Students interested in the minor should enroll in 
BK 104-105 (HS 283-284) Afro-American His- 
tory I, II in their sophomore year. They will 
choose three electives: of the three, one must be 
in either literature or sociology and one must be 
concerned with Africa or with the Caribbean. The 
minor culminates in a seminar or senior project. 
Black Studies course offerings are cross-listed 
under the prefix "BK" with several Arts and Sci- 
ences departments; for descriptions of Black Stud- 
ies courses offered in 1992-93, refer to the depart- 
ment listings for English, History, Sociology, 
Communication and Theater, and Theology. 
Students interested in the minor should see Prof. 
Amanda Houston, Lyons 301 (x3238). 

Black Studies at Boston College has also de- 
veloped a unique and significant specialization in 
local black history. A course in Boston's black 
history is offered annually and the program regu- 
larly sponsors a conference on "Blacks in Boston." 
For further information, consult Amanda Hous- 
ton, Director, Black Studies. 

Church History 

The minor is designed to give students an over- 
view of the history of the Christian community, 
its life, thought, structure, and worship from its 
beginnings to the present day in introductory- 
level courses. In upper level courses, the student 
can focus on the development of the Church 
within a particular era or geographical setting. 

The minor is open to all students, but may be of 
special interest to those interested in history, lit- 
erature, theology, or philosophy. Professors for 
the minor are drawn from both the theology and 
the history departments. 

The normal requirements are: 1) a required, 
two-semester introductory survey, TH 1 50- 151, 

I he Christian Community: A History or its 
equivalent; 2) two courses approved by the direc- 
tor of the minor program, in either the same his- 
torical period or in closely related periods; e.g., 2 



early church history courses; or 1 early church 
history course and 1 medieval course; 2 Reforma- 
tion courses; or 1 Reformation course and 1 mod- 
ern European course; or 1 modern European 
course and 1 American course; and 3) two upper 
level electives. 

Normally, a student may not use the same 
course to satisfy both major and minor require- 
ments. A student should be aware that if a course 
is not offered in his/her field of interest, many 
faculty will agree to a private course of directed 
readings. The student will choose or be assigned 
an advisor from the faculty affiliated with the 
minor. Inquiries should be addressed to the direc- 
tor. Director of the minor is Prof. James Weiss 
(Theology), assisted by Profs. Donald Dietrich, 
Margaret Schatkin, Thomas Wangler, Stephen 
Brown, and Pamela Jackson (all Theology), Ben- 
jamin Braude, Alan Reinerman, Virginia 
Reinburg (History) and others. 

Cognitive Science 

The Cognitive Science minor aims to introduce 
students to the new and exciting field of Cogni- 
tive Science. Cognitive Science is an interdisci- 
plinary field which seeks to understand learning, 
thinking, perceiving, remembering, and under- 
standing by looking at them from an information 
processing point of view. It draws its ideas from Psy- 
chology, Linguistics, Computer Science, Philoso- 
phy, and Neuroscience. 

The minor is intended to let students learn to 
understand, and perhaps contribute to, this field 
while at the same time developing a better under- 
standing of how their own minds work and a bet- 
ter ability to work across the borders of traditional 
disciplines. 

The minor requires six courses outside the 
student's major field. 1) Three foundation 
courses: PS 147, Cognitive Psychology, MC 140, 
Computer Science I (orMT 550, Introduction to 
Structured Programming), and PL 314, The 
Mind and Its Body. 2) Three courses from one of 
the following tracks: a) Machine Intelligence: MC 
373, Robotics, MC 359, Artificial Intelligence, 
MC 358, Lisp and Prolog, b) Perception/Cognition: 
PS 073, Introductory Psychology, PS 143, Per- 
ception, PS 144, Learning Theories, PS 251, Psy- 
chology of Language, d) Language: 1) SL 311, 
General Linguistics. 2) A topic in linguistics 
which can be fulfilled by one of the following: SL 
344, Syntax and Semantics, or SL 351, Topics in 
Linguistic Theory, or SL 399, Semiotics and 
Structure. 3) A course in the psychology of lan- 
guage (such as PS 251) or in the philosophy of 
language (such as PL 574). e) Neuroscience: PS 273 
or BI 48 1 , Introduction to Neuroscience, BI 552, 
Developmental Neurobiology, PS 150, Physi- 
ological Psychology, PS 187, Brain Damage and 
the Mind, PS 642, Cognitive Neuropsychology, 
f) Theory: PL 577, Introduction to Symbolic 
Logic, MC 385, Theory of Machines and Lan- 
guages, or MT 585, Automata and Formal Lan- 
guages, SL 311, General Linguistics, g) Philoso- 
phy of Mind: PL 574, Approaches to Language, PL 
577, Introduction to Symbolic Logic, PL 615, 
British Empiricism, PL 661, Aristotle's Scientific- 
Method, PL 768, Insight. Students may not take a 
track in their major. 

Interested students should contact the Direc- 
tor, Prof. Jeanne Sholl, McGuinn 343 (x4554). 



Faith, Peace, and Justice Studies 

Faith, Peace, and Justice do not always seem com- 
patible; an unjust peace may breed violence; an 
overzealous faith may attack the civil rights of 
non-believers. Still, the Judeo-Christian, and 
other major faith traditions attest to the power of 
God to heal worldly divisions and promise vari- 
ous forms of reconciliation to earthly strife. How 
these attestations and promises relate to the work 
for peace and justice is the question this minor is 
organized to explore. In this way, the academic 
discipline serves those who hope that their own 
faith and desire to live it more intelligently may 
contribute to peace and justice in the world. 

Faith, Peace, and Justice minors are given the 
opportunity and challenge to design their own 
interdisciplinary program of studies. This pro- 
gram, assembled by the student with the advice 
of an FPJ faculty advisor and requiring the ap- 
proval of the FPJ director, follows a sequence of 
three stages: 1) general introduction, 2) structured 
exploration, 3) integrative synthesis. The intro- 
duction is provided by UN 160 "The Challenge 
of Justice." Integrative synthesis is accomplished 
during the senior seminar, UN 590. In between, 
exploration is structured by the student's choice 
of one course in each of the following four areas: 
a) Information and/or Interpretations on the 
Human Condition; b) Foundations in Faith for 
Peace and Justice; c) Resources for Maintaining 
Order or Promoting Change; d) Methods for 
Reconciling Conflicting Claims and Forces. 

Faculty advisement and consent of the FPJ 
director are aimed at guiding the student's choices 
of courses toward the formation of a meaningful 
cluster of four courses. This "cluster" is the foun- 
dation for each student's senior project. 

For more information contact the Director, 
Professor James Rurak, Gasson 109, (x3886). 

Film Studies 

The Film Studies Program has arisen out of a 
need and desire to assist students in developing 
critical and technical skills in the area of film. 
Video, photography, and television also play a 
supportive role in the development of these skills. 
As a part of the Film Studies Program a student 
can pursue any of the electives dealing with above 
aspects of communications. The Film minor, a 
joint undertaking of the Fine Arts Department 
and the Communication and Theater Depart- 
ment, is comprised of six courses: three required 
(Basic Filmmaking, History of European Film, 
and Mass Media in the Twentieth Century or 
Film as Communication) and three electives from 
the areas of animation, production, film criticism 
and history, communications, and photography. 
These courses can be taken over a four-year pe- 
riod in any order convenient to the student's 
schedule. 

Students interested in the Film Studies Pro- 
gram or Film minor can contact Prof. John 
Michalczyk in Gasson 112(1 lonors Program Li- 
brary), x4573. 

German Studies 

The minor in German Studies offers an interdis- 
ciplinary approach to the language and cultures 
of Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The fore- 
most goal of the program is to provide partici- 
pants with a broad, yet in-depth understanding of 



College of Arts & Sciences • Minors • 21 



the various contributions which German-speak- 
ing civilization has made — from the early Middle 
Ages up to the present — to the development of the 
Western world. Among the disciplines which may 
be studied are the literature, art, music, history, 
theology and philosophy of the German world. 

Students wishing to minor in German Stud- 
ies are required to complete six one-semester 
courses. Of these six electives, a minimum of three 
upper-level courses are required within the De- 
partment of Germanic Studies; one of these three 
courses will be GM 242 (Germany Divided and 
Reunited: The Socio-Cultural Scene). The re- 
maining three courses may be chosen — in consul- 
tation with the Director of the minor — from the 
relevant offerings of at least two of the following 
departments: history, music, theology, fine arts 
and philosophy. Such courses, which should fo- 
cus upon subjects related to German culture, will 
include (but are not limited to) the following: HS 
143 (Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich), HS 
441-442 (Rise of Modern Germany 1815-1945), 
MU 150 (Symphony), MU 151 (Concerto), MU 
1 77 (Amadeus: Mozart and Myth), PL 41 9 (Kant 
and Hegel), PL 42 1 (Nietzsche — Prophet of Ni- 
hilism), PL 338-339 (The Heidegger Project), PL 
429 (Freud and Philosophy), PL 448 (Kant's Cri- 
tique), PL 456 (The Holocaust: A Moral History), 
PL 561 (Freud and Phenomenology), PL 613 
(Marx's Grundrisse), PL 632 (The Later 
Heidegger), PL 634 (The Philosophy of Jurgen 
Habermas), TH 529 (Nietzsche and Christianity). 

Students who are already pursuing a double 
major will not be accepted into the German Stud- 
ies minor. Planning and fulfillment of the minor 
in German Studies require the final approval of 
the Director of the minor. Finally, students are 
encouraged to consult with the Director concerning 
opportunities for study abroad during their jun- 
ior year at a German or Austrian university. In- 
terested students are asked to contact the Direc- 
tor of the minor, Professor Gert Bruhn (Depart- 
ment of Germanic Studies, Carney Hall 357, 
x3742orx.3740). 

International Studies 

International Studies is an interdisciplinary field 
combining work in several departments and pro- 
fessional schools which includes cultural, politi- 
cal and economic relations among nations, inter- 
national organizations, multinational corpora- 
tions, private international institutions, and 
broader social or intellectual movements. Its pur- 
pose is to help students carefully design their own 
program around a central theme focusing on an 
international issue or problem, a theoretical ques- 
tion or a geographic region. The program pro- 
vides background for careers in government, busi- 
ness, non-profit organizations, international in- 
stitutions and journalism, as well as for graduate 
study. Students are strongly encouraged to in- 
clude in their programs foreign study, internship 
or volunteer experience. In an increasing number 
of cases students have successfully proposed an 
independent academic major in this field. 

Interested students should read carefully the 
brochure available in McGuinn 201 and discuss 
their goals with the Director, Prof. David Deese, 
Political Science Department, McGuinn 217 
(x4585) or his Assistants, and, if desired, with one 



of the other faculty advisors listed below. They 
must then submit a personal statement of two or 
three typed pages which explains the theme of 
their coursework. Students enrolled in the minor 
must take at least six courses (on the approved list) 
from at least three different departments or 
schools, including at least 1) two theoretical, com- 
parative or thematic courses (page one of the 
course list) and 2) two regional or area studies 
courses, with at least one focused on third world 
nations or other non-western cultures (starting on 
page two of the course list) and 3) the completion 
of a substantial paper on an approved topic pre- 
pared in a course taken for the minor during se- 
nior year. Once completed, the academic minor 
in International Studies will be recorded on the 
student's transcript. 

For information and assistance, please pick up 
a brochure from the Political Science Department 
or contact one of the following faculty advisors: 
Prof. Patrick Byrne, Philosophy Department, 
Carney 268 (x3865), Prof. Robert Murphy, Eco- 
nomics Department, Carney 145 (x3688), Prof. 
David Deese (Director of the Minor), Political 
Science Department, McGuinn 217 (x4585), 
Prof. Paul Gray, Sociology Department, 
McGuinn 417 (x4140), Prof. David Northrup, 
History Department, Carney 169 (x3792). 

Irish Studies 

The Irish Studies minor offers an interdisciplinary 
approach to the culture and society of Ireland. 
Individual courses cover the areas of social, po- 
litical, and economic history, literature, drama 
and theater, medieval art, sociology, and the Irish 
language. In addition, there are several courses 
that are jointly taught by faculty from various dis- 
ciplines. These include: a three-semester se- 
quence of courses integrating the history and lit- 
erature of Ireland from the eighteenth to the 
twentieth centuries and a study tour in Ireland, a 
one-semester course culminating in two to three 
weeks of field study in Ireland. 

Irish Studies offers a junior year program at 
University College, Cork, which provides expo- 
sure to Irish ethnography, folklore, and anthro- 
pology in addition to regular academic offerings. 
Interested students should apply to the Junior 
Year Abroad Office and see Prof. Adele Dalsimer, 
English Department, or Prof. Kevin O'Neill, 
History Department. 

The Abbey Theatre Program, a five-week 
Summer Workshop, consists of an intensive five 
weeks of classes, lectures, and demonstrations by 
members of the Abbey Theatre Company in act- 
ing, directing, production, and management, cul- 
minating in the staging of an Irish play. There will 
also be lectures in the history of the Irish theater. 
Interested students should apply to Prof. Marg- 
aret Dever, English Department. Students minor- 
ing in Irish Studies are eligible for the Maeve 
O'Reilly Finley Fellowship to be used for gradu- 
ate study in Ireland. This fellowship will be 
awarded annually to an Irish Studies Minor. 

Italian Studies 

The minor in Italian Studies, an interdisciplinary 
program created by the Departments of Fine Arts, 
History, and Romance Languages and Litera- 
tures, invites students to learn about the impor- 
tant role which the people of the Italian penin- 



sula have played in the development of Western 
civilization. Courses cover Italy's social, economic 
and political history from the eleventh century to 
the present, a broad range of studies on develop- 
ments in painting, sculpture and architecture from 
Early Medieval times to the present, Italian Film, 
and the study of the great works of Italian litera- 
ture. 

Six one-semester courses are required, two in 
literature, two in history, and two in art history. 
One of the six courses will be the introductory 
course, "Italy: Art, Literature and History" (FA 
297/HS 249/RL 294), which may be credited to 
the department of the student's choice. 

Students will be required to select elective 
courses in consultation with a member of the Ital- 
ian Studies Committee: Prof. Scott Van Doren, 
History (x3 166); Prof. Josephine von Henneberg, 
Fine Arts (x8595); and Prof. Rena Lamparska, 
Romance Languages and Literatures (x3824) and 
to coordinate their choice with the Director of the 
Program, Prof. Josephine von Henneberg. 

Substitutions for specific program require- 
ments and the application of cross-registered 
courses from other academic institutions require 
express permission in advance from the Italian 
Studies Committee. Courses already being used 
for a major may not be applied to the Italian Stud- 
ies minor. Students who have a double major or 
who already have a major and another minor will 
not be accepted. 

For further information, contact Prof. 
Josephine von Henneberg, Barry 310 (x8595). 

Medieval Studies 

This interdisciplinary program has as its focus the 
civilization of the Middle Ages, the thousand-year 
period from the end of the Roman Empire to the 
Renaissance which produced Thomas Aquinas 
and Dante, Eleanor of Aquitaine and Thomas 
Becket, knights and chivalry, cathedrals and uni- 
versities. A student enrolled in this program as an 
Independent Major, or as a minor, may investi- 
gate all the expressions of medieval society and its 
culture in courses in medieval history, philosophy, 
theology, art history, languages, and literature. 

The normal course of study for the minor, six 
one-semester courses, requires: 1) HS 165-166 
Medieval European History I/II and 2) four elec- 
tives, two of which must be taken from one ot the 
following sequences: FA 221-222 Art of the Medi- 
eval World 'I/II, PL 340-341 Philosophy in the Middle 
Ages I/II, two courses in a language or literature of 
the Middle Ages. 

Additional elective courses may be found un- 
der the appropriate departmental listings (Clas- 
sical Studies, English, Fine Arts, Germanic Stud- 
ies, History, Philosophy, Romance Languages, 
Slavic and Eastern Languages, and Theology) and 
may be chosen with the advice of a member ot the 
Medieval Studies committee. 

Students who wish to obtain further informa- 
tion or to register for this program should con- 
tact the Director, Prof. Laurie Shepard, Lyons 
311 (x3820). 

Middle Eastern Studies 

This program emphasizes the interdisciplinary 
study of the Middle East from the rise of Islam in 
the seventh century to the present. Through a 
sequence of courses it offers preparation in 



22 • College of Arts & Sciences • Interdisciplinary Programs 



Middle Eastern Studies useful for careers such as 
journalism, diplomacy, business, and social ser- 
vice, as well as graduate programs of academic and 
professional training. Courses cover both the so- 
cial, economic, political, cultural, and religious 
heritage as well as contemporary developments in 
their regional and world settings. Students who 
wish to formalize their study of the Middle East 
may complete a six-course minor as follows: 

1) By demonstrating proficiency in a Middle 
Eastern language by examination or coursework, 
2 ) by completing 6 courses distributed as follows: 
the introductory course HS 207/TH 152, Islamic 
Civilization in the Middle East; 1 course in His- 
tory or Political Science concerning the Middle 
East; and 4 approved elective courses from the 
following areas: Art History, Theology, Econom- 
ics, History; Middle Eastern Literature or a sec- 
ond Middle Eastern language, Political Science, 
Sociology. 

For further information, consult the Director, 
Prof. Ali Banuazizi, Psychology Department, 
McGuinn324, (x4124). 

Modern Greek Studies 

The minor in Modern Greek Studies aims at pro- 
viding a framework for students who, in addition 
to their major in another field, want to gain some 
expertise in the language, culture, literature, and 
history of contemporary Greece. 

In many respects, the (glorious) legacy of an- 
cient Greece continues to our day. With the ad- 
vent of European integration, planned for 1992, 
it is particularly appropriate to study in depth the 
language, culture, literature, and history of one 
of the twelve participants in the new federation 
which is sure to provide a challenge to the United 
States. 

The minor should be of special interest to the 
large Boston College undergraduate population 
of (ireek descent because it offers to those stu- 
dents an academic presentation of their heritage. 
To all students it grants the opportunity to test 
the approaches of their major field of concentra- 
tion by applying them to the — very interesting — 
case of modern Greece. 

Requirements: For the minor in Modern Greek 
Studies six one-semester courses are required, as 
follows: 1) an introductory level course entitled 
"Introduction to the Modern Greek World"; 2) 
two courses in Modern Greek language; 3) two 
approved electives (the choice is to be determined 
by consultation with a departmental advisor) in 
history or literature; and 4) an advanced seminar 
or independent study in readings and research, 
during which a senior paper will usually be writ- 
ten. 

Some of the requirements under (2) and (3) 
may be fulfilled through study at a recognized 
program in ( ireece (for further information con- 
tact the Junior Year Abroad Program or the De- 
partment of Classical Studies). 

lor further information contact the Director 
of the minor in Modern Greek Studies, Prof. 
Eugene Bushala, Department of Classical Stud- 
ies, Carney 124(x4935). 

Russian and East European Studies 

The Russian and East European Studies minor 
enables a student to study the language, history, 
literature, and social structure of Eastern Europe 
and the Soviet Union from a number of disciplin- 



ary perspectives. The minor requires six approved 
courses, distributed as follows: 1 introductory 
course (PC) 080/HS 272, Introduction to Russian, 
Soviet and East European Studies); 1 additional 
course in Russian or East European history or 
politics; 2 courses in Russian or another East 
European language at the intermediate or upper- 
division level; 2 approved elective courses from 
two of the following areas: Philosophy (PL), 
Theology (TH), Economics (EC), Literature or 
language (SL, CL, RL), Political Science (PO), 
History (HS), Art History or Film Studies (FA), 
a directed senior research paper. At least one of 
these two courses must come from outside of the 
student's emphasis area. 

Substitutions for specific requirements of the 
normal program and the application of cross-reg- 
istered courses from neighboring institutions re- 
quire express permission in advance from the 
Director of the minor. Courses already being used 
for a major may not apply also to the Russian and 
East European Studies minor. 

Further information is available from the Di- 
rector of the minor, Prof. Michael Connolly, 
Carney 236 (x3912). 

Women's Studies 

The Women's Studies Program coordinates 
courses which explore the impact of sex and gen- 
der on the institutions that shape public and pri- 
vate life. It especially seeks to understand the lives 
of women, both historically and cross culturally. 

The Women's Studies Program offers an in- 
terdisciplinary minor, a combination of six courses 
from at least three different departments, which 
includes as required courses: Introduction to 
Feminism (EN 125, PS 125, SC 225) and Ad- 
vanced Topics in Women's Studies (EN 593). 

An unusual offering is Introduction to Feminism, 
a student-taught course under faculty direction in 
which small groups of students read and discuss 
materia] from several disciplines, write journals, 
attend faculty guest lectures, and do both oral and 
written presentations, often working in teams. 
The other courses making up the minor cut across 
many departments including history, literature, 
philosophy, psychology, sociology, romance lan- 
guages, theology as well as other fields including 
education. 

For further information, contact the Director 
of Women's Studies, Dr. Lorraine Liscio, English 
Department (x8528). 

OTHER INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS 

Center for East Europe, Russia and 
Asia (CEERA) 

The Center's programs encourage faculty and 
students to participate in interdepartmental en- 
deavors on both the graduate and undergraduate 
levels. Participating faculty come from the De- 
partments of Economics, Education, Fine Arts, 
I listory. Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, 
Slavic & Eastern Languages, and Theology, and 
offer over eighty academic courses connected with 
the study of the culture, history and political life 
of fast Europe, Russia and Asia. Faculty mem- 
bers offer an interdisciplinary course, HS 272 (PO 
080), Introduction to Russian, Soviet and East 
European Studies, which provides the student 
with the key themes, theories, and approaches 



necessary for further detailed study of Russia, the 
USSR, and the East European states. 

CEERA also sponsors talks and symposia on 
topics of interest. 

Undergraduate students may also earn a cer- 
tificate of proficiency from the Center. Certificate 
requirements and other information of the opera- 
tion of the Center are available from: Prof. 
Raymond T. McNally, Director (History) Car- 
ney 171. 

Environmental Studies 

The Environmental Studies Program assists stu- 
dents in the design of interdisciplinary projects 
and programs dealing with environmental mat- 
ters. Through it, students have access to environ- 
mental facilities and resources at fourteen area 
institutions. 

Students in the Environmental Studies Pro- 
gram must major in a specific discipline. They 
may, however, develop a related concentration in 
environmental studies by choosing relevant 
courses from the offerings of various departments 
on the BC campus and, in some instances, on the 
campuses of those institutions which have 
consortial arrangements with Boston College. 
Credit can also be obtained for independent study 
and internships with various environmental 
groups, both government and private. The Envi- 
ronmental Program sponsors, from time to time, 
special programs aimed at increasing environ- 
mental awareness. Those interested in pursuing 
studies in this area should contact Prof. George 
Goldsmith, Higgins 466, (x3879). 

The Immersion Program in French 

The Immersion Program is an interdisciplinary 
program administered by the Department of 
Romance Languages and Literature. 

Qualified students may take one to five Core 
or elective courses in French. They may select 
courses in French from History, or Political Sci- 
ence. The Romance Languages Department co- 
ordinating course RL 341-342 will constitute the 
student's fifth course. All potential candidates 
must be interviewed by selected faculty. Prereq- 
uisite: At least the equivalent of intermediate col- 
lege French. For further information contact 
Katharine Hastings, Bourneuf House (x4779). 
For listings of French Immersion courses offered 
in 1992-93, refer to the Romance Languages sec- 
tion of this Catalog. 

The Immersion Program in Spanish 

The Immersion Program is an interdisciplinary 
program administered by the Department of 
Romance Languages and Literature. 

Qualified students may take Core or elective 
courses in Spanish. They may select from courses 
in History and Spanish Culture. The Romance 
Languages Department encourages students to 
enroll in the coordinating course, RL 343-344. 

For further information contact Katharine 
Flastings, Bourneuf House (x4779). For listings 
of Spanish Immersion courses offered in 1992- 
93, refer to the Romance Languages section of 
this Catalog. 



College of Arts & Sciences • Biochemistry • 23 



SENIOR AWARDS AND HONORS 

Scholar of the College: For unusual scholarly 
and/or creative talent as demonstrated in course- 
work and the Scholar's Project. Candidates for 
Scholar of the College are nominated by the de- 
partment chairperson and selected by the Dean 
in their junior year. 

Order of the Cross and Crown: For men and 
women who, while achieving an average of at least 
3.5, have established records of unusual service 
and leadership on the campus. 

Bapst Philosophy Medal: For overall outstand- 
ing performance in philosophy courses. 

Andres Bello Award: For excellence in Spanish. 

George F. Bemis Award: For distinguished ser- 
vice to others. 

Albert A. Bennett Award: For a high level of 
mathematical achievement and interest in and 
desire for a career in teaching. 

Wendy Berson Award: For excellence in Ro- 
mance Languages. 

Alice Bourne uf Award: For excellence in Eco- 
nomics. 

Francis A. Brick Award: For outstanding char- 
acter, loyalty, leadership, and scholarship during 
four years at Boston College. 

Brendan Connolly, S.J. Award: For outstanding 
love of books and learning. 

Matthew Copithorne Scholarship: For a gradu- 
ating senior who exhibits exemplary qualities of 
character, industry and intelligence and plans to 
do graduate study at Harvard or M.I.T. 

Cardinal Cushing Award: For the best creative 
literary composition published in a Boston Col- 
lege undergraduate periodical. 

The Joseph Dever Fellowship: For a graduating 
senior who shows promise of a career in writing. 

Patrick Durcan Award: For overall outstand- 
ing performance in history courses. 

Maeve O'Reilly Finley Fellowship: For a gradu- 
ating senior or Boston College graduate student 
who has demonstrated outstanding achievement 
in Irish Studies and who will enter an Irish uni- 
versity graduate program. 

Mary A. and Katherine G. Finneran Commence- 
ment Award: For outstanding success in studies 
while also devoting time and talents to other ac- 
tivities for the enrichment of the college and stu- 
dent life. 

Thomas I. Gasson, S.J. Award: For a distin- 
guished academic record over four years. 

General Excellence Medal: For general excel- 
lence in all branches of studies during the entire 
four years at Boston College. 

Princess Grace of Monaco Award: For excellence 
in French. 

Janet Wilson James Essay Prize: For an out- 
standing Senior Essay in the area of Women's 
Studies. 

William A. Kean Memorial Award: To the out- 
standing English major. 

William J. Kenealy, S.J. Award: For distinction 
in both academic work and social concern. 

Mark J. Kennedy Medical Scholarship: For a stu- 
dent who has been accepted to a medical school 
and who has been outstanding in character, lead- 
ership and scholarship. 

Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. Award: Presented annu- 
ally to the senior member of the Boston College 



Dramatics Society who has most clearly exhibited 
the qualities of dedication and integrity exempli- 
fied by the life and career of Rev. Joseph M. 
Larkin, S.J. 

Allison R. Macomber, Jr. Award in the Fine Arts: 
For outstanding work in the Fine Arts. 

Richard and Marianne Martin Award: For ex- 
cellence in Art History and Studio Art. 

John W. McCarthy, S.J. Award: For the out- 
standing project under the Scholar of the College 
Program. 

Albert McGuinn, S.J. Award: For excellence in 
a science or mathematics major combined with 
achievement — either academic, extracurricular, 
or a combination of both — in the social sciences 
or humanities. 

Henry J. McMahon Award: For a graduating 
senior who has been accepted at a law school and 
has been distinguished by scholarship, loyalty, and 
service to the College. 

John F. Norton Award: To the student who best 
personifies the tradition of humanistic scholar- 
ship. 

Cardinal O'Connell Theology Medal: For over- 
all outstanding performance in theology courses. 

John H. Randall Award: For the best essay on 
American literature or culture during the previ- 
ous year. 

Mary Werner Roberts Award: Given in honor 
of Mrs. Vincent P. Roberts, benefactress of the 
University, for the best art work published in the 
Stylus this year. 

Secondary Education Award: For a student in 
the College of Arts and Sciences who has com- 
pleted the Secondary Education Program within 
the School of Education and has achieved distin- 
guished success as a student teacher. 

Harry W. Smith Award: For use of personal 
talents to an exceptional degree in the service of 
others. 



Joseph Stanton Award: To a student who has 
been accepted to a medical school and who has 
been outstanding in character, loyalty, leadership, 
and scholarship at Boston College. 

Tully Theology Award: For the best paper on a 
theological subject. 

Max Wainer Award: To the senior who is 
deemed the outstanding student in classics. 

Nominations for these awards may be submitted 
to the Office of the Dean. 

AREAS OF MAJOR STUDY 

The philosophy and objective of each major are 
presented below, along with specific course re- 
quirements. These requirements include the 
number of courses, as well as specific courses or 
distribution requirements necessary for the ma- 
jor. They may also include requirements for 
achieving departmental honors. Students are sub- 
ject to the major requirements as published for the 
year in which they entered Boston College. 

In a liberal arts college, the major is not only 
a path to some future profession, but is itself, to- 
gether with Core courses, and electives taken in 
other areas, a liberal arts experience. A major is a 
systematic concentration of courses taken in a 
given academic discipline which enables a student 
to acquire a somewhat more specialized knowl- 
edge of the methodologies used in the discipline, 
their origins, their possibilities and limitations, 
and the current state of the art. This is done by 
means of a hierarchical sequence of courses or by 
appropriate distribution requirements. Attention 
is to be given to the history of the discipline, its 
various methodologies and research tools, and to 
its various subfields, and the areas of concern in 
which the discipline is presently involved. 



Biochemistry 



This interdisciplinary major in Biochemistry, 
administered jointly by the Chemistry and Biol- 
ogy Departments, provides the student with a 
broad background in Biochemistry and related 
courses in Chemistry and Biology. This major is 
intended for those interested in the more chemi- 
cal and molecular aspects of the life sciences. The 
minimum requirements for the Biochemistry 
Major are: 

• Two semesters of General Chemistry and 
laboratory 

CH 109-1 10 (or CH 117-1 18) lecture 
CH 1 1 1-1 12 (or CH 1 19-120) laboratory 

• Two semesters of Introductory Biology and 
laboratory 

BI 200-202 lecture 
BI 201-203 laboratory 

• Two semesters of Organic Chemistry and 
laboratory 

CH 231-232 (or CH 241-242) lecture 
CH 233-234 (or CH 243-244) laboratory 

• One semester of Bacteriology and laboratory 
BI 310 lecture 

BI 3 1 1 laboratory 



• One semester of Principles of Genetic 
Analysis and laboratory 

BI 302 lecture 
BI 303 laboratory 

• One semester of Analytical Chemistry and 
laboratory 

CH 351 lecture & laboratory 

• One semester of Physical Chemistry 
CH 473 lecture 

• Two semesters of Biochemistry/Molecular 
Biology 

CH 561-562 Biochemistry I & II lecture; or 
BI 435 & BI 440 Biological Chemistry, Molecu- 
lar Biology lecture 

• One semester of Biochemistry laboratory 
BI 480 or CH 563 laboratory 

• Two advanced electives from the following 
list: 

CH 564 Physical Methods in Biochemistry 
CH 565 Structure and Function of Nucleic Ac- 
ids 

CH 566 Bioinorganic Chemistry 
CH 567 Protein Structure and Function 



24 • College of Arts & Sciences • Biology 



CH 569 Enzyme Mechanisms 
CH 570 Biomembranes 
BI 406 Cell Biology 

BI 454 Introduction to the Literature of Bio- 
chemistry 

BI 474 Principles of Metabolism 
BI 5 1 5 Biophysical Chemistry 
BI 556 Developmental Biology 
BI 558 Neurogenetics 
BI 570 Biology of the Nucleus 

In addition to the above the following courses are 
also required: 

• Two semesters of Physics with laboratory 
PH 211-212 lecture and laboratory 

• Two semesters of Calculus 
MT 100-101 lecture 

Students are also strongly urged to engage in a 
Senior Research project under the direction of a 
faculty member involved in biochemical research. 
This year-long project replaces the requirement 
for Biochemistry Laboratory (BI 480 or CH 563). 
BI 463-464 Research in Biochemistry* 
CH 593-594 Introduction to Biochemical Re- 
search* or (BI 399, CH 399) Scholar of the Col- 
lege* 
*With approval 

COURSE SEQUENCE 

First Year 

• General Chemistry (CH 109-1 10 or CH 
117-118) with laboratory 

• Calculus (MT 100-101) 

• Introductory Biology (BI 200-202) with 
laboratory 

Second Year (Fall) 

• Physics (PH 211) with laboratory 

• Organic Chemistry (CH 23 1 or CH 241) with 
laboratory 

• Bacteriology (BI 310) with laboratory 
Second Year (Spring) 

• Physics (PH 212) with laboratory 

• Organic Chemistry (CH 232 or CH 242) with 
laboratory 

• Principles of Genetic Analysis (BI 302) with 
laboratory (BI 303) 

Third Year (Fall) 

• Biological Chemistry (BI 435) or Biochemistry 
I(CH561) 

• Analytical Chemistry (CH 351) 
Third Year (Spring) 

• Molecular Biology (BI 440) or Biochemistry II 
(CH 562) 

• Physical Chemistry (CH 473) 

Fourth Year 

• Biochemistry Laboratory (BI 480 or CH 563) 

• Two advanced electives 

For additional information, contact either Profes- 
sor Kantrowitz (Devlin 224) or Professor 
Annunziato (Higgins 422). 



B 



o 



o 



FACULTY 

Maurice Liss, Professor, A.B., Harvard Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Tufts University School of Medi- 
cine 

Thomas N. Seyfried, Professor, B.A., St. 
Francis College; M.S., Illinois State University; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Jolane Solomon, A.B., Hunter College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Anthony T. Annunziato, Associate Professor, 
B.S., Boston College; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Maria L. Bade, Associate Professor, B.S., M.S., 
University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Yale University 
Medical School 

Grant W. Balkema, Associate Professor, B.S., 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

William J. Brunken, Associate Professor, B.S., 
Long Island University; Ph.D., State University 
of New York, Stony Brook 

Mary Kathleen Dunn, Associate Professor, B.A., 
University of Kansas; M.A., Michigan State 
University; Ph.D., University of North Caro- 
lina at Chapel Hill 

Walter J. Fimian Jr., Associate Professor, A.B., 
University of Vermont; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Notre Dame 

James J. Gilroy, Associate Professor, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Scranton; M.S., Catholic University; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Jonathan J. Goldthwaite, Associate Professor, 
B.S., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; 
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Joseph A. Orlando, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Merrimack College; M.S., North Carolina 
State College; Ph.D., University of California, 
Berkeley 

William H. Petri, Associate Professor, Chairper- 
son of the Department; A.B., Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley 

Donald J. Plocke, S.J., Associate Professor, B.S., 
Yale University; A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

R. Douglas Powers, Associate Professor, A.B., 
SUNY; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Allyn H. Rule, Associate Professor, B.S., Central 
Connecticut College; A.M., Ph.D., Boston 

University 

Chester S. Stachow, Associate Professor, B.S., 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Manitoba 

Charles S. Hoffman, Assistant Professor, S.B., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 
Tufts University 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The goal to be attained by the student is knowl- 
edge and understanding of the fundamentals of 
biological science. The biology program provides 
a foundation for advanced study in various basic 
and applied areas of biology. These include the 
health-related professions as well as a diversity of 
other careers. Formal course offerings, laboratory 
work, and individual research projects under the 
guidance of a faculty advisor offer the student 
opportunity for individual initiative and creativ- 
ity. 

Requirements: One year each of general chem- 
istry (CH 109-110), organic chemistry, (CH 
231-232), and physics (PH 211-212), each with 
the accompanying laboratory course, and one year 
of calculus (MT 100-101). Within the Depart- 
ment, the following courses are required: Intro- 
ductory Biology and Laboratory (BI 200-202, BI 
201-203), Principles of Genetic Analysis and 
Laboratory (BI 302-303) and Bacteriology and 
Laboratory (BI 310-311). Both Genetics and Bac- 
teriology are to be taken in the sophomore year. 
Five additional upper-division elective courses in 
biology (400 and 500 level), exclusive of Seminars 
and Tutorials, complete the minimal require- 
ments for the major. Normally, for the purposes 
of this requirement undergraduate research 
courses (BI 461-467) and graduate courses at the 
600 level or higher do not count as upper division 
electives. However, in certain limited cases with 
the recommendation of a faculty advisor and the 
prior permission of the department chairperson, 
two or more semesters of research may be allowed 
to substitute for one upper-division elective. Stu- 
dents are generally advised to take additional 
courses in biology and related areas. Those plan- 
ning to pursue graduate studies and research in 
the biological sciences should consult departmen- 
tal advisors regarding additional courses to take 
to prepare for graduate school. Those specifically 
interested in emphasizing the field of biochemis- 
try in their studies should consider the interde- 
partmental biochemistry major described in the 
preceding section of this Catalog. 

Research Opportunities for 
Undergraduates 

Research is a fundamental aspect of university 
science study and the Biology Department en- 
courages interested majors to take advantage of 
the many undergraduate research programs avail- 
able. There are a variety of research programs 
available and you can start as early as your fresh- 
man year. Opportunities with a variety of levels 
of commitment are available, from single-semes- 
ter courses to projects involving four semesters or 
more. Normally students are advised to spend at 
least 2 semesters on a research project. 

Undergraduate Research: (BI 461-462), is 
typically a six-credit, two-semester commitment 
where students work on ongoing research projects 
in laboratories with other students under faculty 
guidance. Projects can be optionally extended for 
a second year under Advanced Undergraduate 



College of Arts & Sciences • Biology • 25 



Research (BI 465-467) and enriched by the addi- 
tion of the Tutorial in Biology (BI 490). 

Scholar of the College: (BI 399) is a 12- 
credit commitment over two semesters. This 
highly competitive program, which requires the 
Dean's approval, is designed for ambitious and 
talented undergraduates who are interested in 
devoting a major portion of their senior year to 
scholarly, state-of-the-art research of a quality 
which can lead to publication. Students define, 
develop and research their own projects with close 
faculty supervision. Completion of a written re- 
search thesis is required. Although not required, 
Scholar's applicants may have taken BI 461-462 
or BI 465-467 previously. 

Undergraduate research projects may involve 
almost any area of biology. Currently major fac- 
ulty research work centers in the fields of cellular 
and molecular biology, neurobiology and physi- 
ology, developmental biology and gene expres- 
sion, biochemistry and immunology. For a pam- 
phlet describing specific areas of faculty research, 
or for information on enrolling in the above 
courses, contact your faculty advisor or the De- 
partment office. 

The Sonntag Institute for Cancer Re- 
search also offers selected biology undergradu- 
ates the opportunity to conduct independent and 
supervised research in the field of cancer under 
course numbers BI 491-498. 

Biochemistry Major 

Refer to the preceding section for a description 
of this interdisciplinary major. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

An asterisk (*) after a course tide indicates that a 
course carries a laboratory fee. Courses numbered 
500-599 are for undergraduate and graduate reg- 
istration. 

Bi 100 Survey of Biology I (F: 3) 

A survey of biology without laboratory, designed 
for students who have had no previous courses in 
biology. The course mainly discusses humans 
with emphasis on the following areas: cellular 
structure, function, chemistry, and the anatomy 
and physiology of the major organ systems of the 
body and how they are influenced by internal and 
external factors. Two lectures per week. 

Eric Strauss 

BI 102 Survey of Biology II (S: 3) 

A continuation of BI 100. The topics discussed 
are: development, classical and molecular genet- 
ics, evolution, ecology, behavior, and environ- 
mental biology. Eric Strauss 

BI 1 10 General Biology I (F: 3) 

A course designed to bring to the attention of stu- 
dents the relevance of biology to everyday life and 
to illustrate application of the scientific method 
to problems of biology. Living organisms are con- 
sidered with respect to their function in isolation 
(topics discussed include diversity, physiology, 
metabolism, genetics, and development), and 
their function in association (topics discussed in- 



clude behavior, population dynamics, ecology, 

evolution). Three lectures per week. 

Jonathan Goldthwaite 
Donald J. Plocke, S.J. 

BI 1 1 1 General Biology Laboratory I* (F: 1) 

Required of students taking BI 110. One two- 
hour laboratory period per week. Lab fee: $ 1 50.00 

Jonathan Goldthwaite 
Donald J. Plocke, S.J. 

BI 1 12 General Biology II (S: 3) 

A continuation of BI 110. The Department 

BI 1 13 General Biology Laboratory II* (S: 1) 

Required of all students taking BI 112. One two- 
hour laboratory period per week. Lab fee: $150.00 

The Department 

BI 1 30 Anatomy and Physiology I (F: 3) 

An intensive introductory course designed to 
bring out the correlations between the structure 
and functions of the various body systems. Each 
system discussed is treated from microscopic to 
macroscopic levels of organization. This course 
is primarily intended to prepare nursing students 
for their clinical career. In addition, it satisfies the 
science Core requirement. Students outside the 
School of Nursing are recommended to consult 
with the Department of Biology. 

Elinor M. O'Brien 

BI 131 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I* 

(F:l) 

Laboratory exercises intended to familiarize the 
students with the various structures and principles 
discussed in BI 130 through the use of anatomi- 
cal models, physiological experiments and limited 
dissection. One two-hour laboratory period per 
week. Required of Nursing students taking BI 
1 30. Lab fee: $ 1 50.00 R. Douglas Powers 

BI 1 32 Anatomy and Physiology II (S: 3) 

A continuation of BI 1 30. The Department 

BI 133 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II* 
(S:1) 

A continuation of BI 1 3 1 . Lab fee: $1 50.00 

R. Douglas Powers 

BI 200 Introductory Biology I (F: 3) 

An introduction to living systems at the molecu- 
lar, cellular, organismal and population levels of 
organization. Three lectures per week. Required 
for biology majors. Anthony Annunziato 

' Robert Wolff 

BI 201 Introductory Biology Laboratory I* (F: 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Re- 
quired of all students taking BI 200. 
Lab fee: $ 1 50.00 Mary Albert 

BI 202 Introductory Biology II (S: 3) 

A continuation of BI 200. Required for biology 
majors. Robert Wolff 

BI 203 Introductory Biology Laboratory II* (S: 1 ) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Re- 
quired of all students taking BI 202. 
Lab fee: $ 1 50.00 Mary Albert 



BI 209 Environmental Biology (F: 3) 

Life on Earth is maintained through a series of 
complex interactions between the environment 
and the many individuals and populations that 
make up communities and ecosystems. The 
course will explore the functioning of living sys- 
tems on several levels of biological organization. 
Some notable examples of dysfunction from both 
past and present experience will also be examined. 
If you ever wondered what happened to the di- 
nosaurs, this is the course for you. Maria Bade 

BI 214 Science and Religion: Contemporary 
Issues (S: 3) 

This course will consider the ways in which the 
natural sciences and religion, in particular Chris- 
tianity, have interacted and the manner in which 
each has influenced the development of the other. 
After a study of some historical examples where 
the relationship has been one of conflict (e.g., 
Galileo, Darwin), the contemporary situation will 
be examined in some detail. Current scientific 
models will be studied (quantum theory, theories 
of origin of the universe and of life, the anthropic 
principle, modern evolution theory, etc.) with a 
view to understanding the way these have influ- 
enced religious thought, e.g., in determining how 
God's action in the world (Providence) may be 
understood in the context of a scientific world 
dominated by laws of probability and chance 
events. The possibilities for a fruitful dialogue 
among natural scientists and Christian theolo- 
gians and the development of a theology of na- 
ture (along the lines suggested by Ian Barbour) 
will be examined. The works of Barbour, 
Polkinghorne, Schilling and others will provide 
the basis for class discussions. 

Some knowledge of science, especially phys- 
ics at the level of a first-year course, will be as- 
sumed. Donald J. Plocke, S. J. 

BI 220 Microbiology (F: 2) 

Prerequisites: BI 130-132 

A study of the basic physiological and bio- 
chemical activities of microorganisms; effective 
methods of destruction; mechanisms of drug ac- 
tion on microorganisms; and the application of 
serological and immunological principles. Two 
lectures per week. Elinor M. O'Brien 

BI 221 Microbiology Laboratory* (F: 1) 

One two-hour laboratory period per week. To be 
taken in conjunction with BI 220. Lab fee: $1 50.00 

Elinor M. O'Brien 

BI 302 Principles of Genetic Analysis (S: 3) 

Corequisite: BI 303 

This course provides an introduction to mod- 
ern genetics. It stresses those aspects of classical 
and molecular approaches which in combination 
have led to the great power of genetics today, and 
which have brought the subject into its current 
position of prominence in biological research. 
Genetic frontiers will be discussed and evaluated. 
Emphasis will be placed on understanding how 
genetic inferences are made and on the use of 
genetic techniques of analysis, rather than on sim- 
ply gathering a large collection of facts. This 



26 • College of Arts & Sciences • Bioi.oca 



course is required for biochemistry majors. This 
course (or BI 300) is required for biology majors. 

Kathleen Dunn 
William H. Petri 

BI 303 Principles of Genetic Analysis 
Laboratory (S: 1) 

A combination of laboratory exercises and discus- 
sion sections designed to give the student an in- 
troductory practical exposure to some basic re- 
search techniques used in modern genetics. 
Lib fee: $ 1 50.00 Kathleen Dunn 

William H. Petri 

BI 310 Bacteriology (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-202, CH 231 taken concur- 
rently or previously 

A study of microorganisms as examples of in- 
dependent cellular life forms, as agents of disease 
and as contributors to the environment of plants, 
animals, and man. Three lectures per week. Re- 
quired for biology majors. Chester S. Stachoiv 

BI 3 1 1 Bacteriology Laboratory* (F: 1 ) 

To be taken in conjunction with BI 310. One 
three-hour laboratory per week. Required for 
biology majors. Lab fee: $150.00 

Chester S. Stachow 

BI 399 Scholar of the College (F, S: 6) 

See the College of Arts and Sciences section of 
this Catalog. This course can count as a maximum 
of one upper-division elective. The Department 

BI 406 Cell Biology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-202 

Cellular and molecular aspects of selected bio- 
logical processes will be covered. Topics will in- 
clude the immune system, effects of animal viruses 
on cells, cell prototypes and specialized functions 
of animal cells. Maurice Liss 

BI 408 Pathogenic Bacteriology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: BI 310-311 

A study of disease causing bacteria with em- 
phases on: their morphological, cultural, serologi- 
cal and other diagnostic characteristics; the patho- 
logical symptoms of their infection and the 
mechanisms of pathogenesis, where known; their 
epidemiology, treatment and control. 

James J. Gilroy 

BI 420 Comparative Vertebrate Embryology (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-202 

A study of the anatomy and physiology of re- 
production, gametogenesis and the early stages of 
development of the chick and mammalian em- 
bryo. Walter J. Fimian,Jr. 

BI 435 Biological Chemistry (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-202 
Corequisite: CI I 231 

The course will cover the properties and 
metabolic activities of various biochemical com- 
pounds: carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins, 
lipids and nucleic acids. To be discussed will be 
how these biochemical processes meet the energy, 
biosynthctic and nutritional requirements of the 
cell. When relevant, reference will be made to 
alterations in these processes in specific diseases. 

Maurice Liss 

BI 440 Molecular Biology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 435 (or equivalent) 

An introduction to the study of the structure, 
synthesis and function of nucleic acids and pro- 



teins. Topics will include methods for studying 
the structure of macromolecules, synthesis, struc- 
ture and function of nucleic acids and proteins, 
kinetics and mechanism of enzyme action and 
biochemical regulatory mechanisms. Three lec- 
tures per week. Donald J. Plocke, S.J. 

BI 442 Principles of Ecology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: BI 200-202 or equivalent, or permis- 
sion of instructor 

Readings in and discussions of principles and 
concepts of modern ecological theory. Ecologi- 
cal relationships will be studied at the individual, 
population, community, and ecosystem levels. 
Evolution will be a common theme throughout 
the course. Past topics have included: mathemati- 
cal models of population growth, behavioral ecol- 
ogy, predator-prey interactions, energy and pro- 
ductivity, and nutrient cycling. If time permits, 
environmental aspects of ecology will be covered 
at the end of the course. There will be two re- 
quired field trips. 

A limited number of places will be reserved for 
non-biology majors who have appropriate back- 
ground experience. Offered biennially. 

The Department 

BI 446 Marine Biology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: BI 200 — 202 (or equivalent) and per- 
mission of instructor. 

An introduction to marine organisms, accom- 
panied by discussion of morphological, physi- 
ological, and behavioral adaptations to the marine 
environment. This will be followed by in-depth 
analysis of selected marine ecosystems. Special 
topics that may be considered at semester's end 
include aquaculture, marine biomedicine, and 
effects of pollution on marine ecosystems. Three 
required field trips. Two lectures per week. A lim- 
ited number of places will be reserved for non- 
biology majors who have appropriate background 
experience. Offered biennially. The Department 

BI 454 The Literature of Biochemistry (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Biochemistry, BI 435; CH 561 

The intent of this course is to familiarize the 
student with the original literature of biochemis- 
try. We will read and discuss a number of impor- 
tant papers on a variety of topics. We will explore 
the many approaches used by biochemists, the 
types of data they obtain through their experi- 
ments, the techniques employed, and the reason- 
ing processes that go into experimental design and 
the interpretation of results. The background 
material necessary for the student to evaluate spe- 
cific papers will be provided during lectures, and 
discussions will be conducted in a seminar-type 
format. Joseph A. Orlando 

BI 460 Understanding Evolution (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

The philosophical and theological aspects of 
evolution in general will be treated, followed by 
a scientific treatment of the origin of life. 

William D. Sullivan, S.J. 

BI 461-462 Undergraduate Research* (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson 

Undergraduate students of advanced standing 
may participate in research projects in the labo- 
ratory of a faculty member. 
Lab fee per semester: $ 1 50.00 The Department 



BI 463-464 Research in Biochemistry (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson 

Undergraduate students of advanced standing 
may participate in research projects in the labo- 
ratory of a faculty member. Lab fee per semester: 
$150.00 The Department 

BI 465-467 Advanced Undergraduate 
Research* (F: 3-S: 3) 

Seniors who have completed at least one semes- 
ter of undergraduate research may enroll in this 
course with the permission of the Chairperson. 
Lab fee per semester: $1 50.00 The Department 

BI 474 Principles of Metabolism (S: 3) 

In order for life to be sustained, living organisms 
must extract energy from their environments and 
must synthesize their building blocks and macro- 
molecules. In this course, we will study specific 
sequences of enzyme-catalyzed reactions that lead 
to the degredation of major energy-rich mol- 
ecules — carbohydrates, fats and amino acids — and 
the release of some of their energy as ATP. In 
addition, we will examine the important pathways 
by which major macromolecules are built from 
simple precursors at the expense of chemical en- 
ergy. Joseph A. Orlando 

BI 480 Biochemistry Laboratory* (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: General Chemistry, Organic Chem- 
istry, and Biochemistry (may be taken concur- 
rently). 

This course deals with isolation, identifica- 
tion, and typical reactions of micro- and macro- 
biomolecules in both theory and practice. Atten- 
dance at a weekly four-hour laboratory and a quiz 
section is required. Lab fee: $150.00 

Jonathan Goldthivaite 
Joseph A. Orlando 

BI 481 Introduction to Neurosciences (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of an introductory biology 
course, i.e. BI 200 

This course is intended to provide a com- 
prehensive introduction to the structure and func- 
tion of the nervous system. We will adopt a multi- 
level approach and consider neural functioning at 
molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Topics 
covered will include the physiology of the neu- 
ron; the pharmacological and molecular bases of 
neurotransmission; the fundamentals of nervous 
system organization; and the neural basis of 
higher order processes such as sensory integration 
and perception, and memory and cognition. 

William Bmnken 
Michael Numan 

BI 490 Tutorial in Biology (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and 
Chairperson 

A directed study through assigned readings and 
discussions of various areas of the biological sci- 
ences. The Department 

BI 493, 495, 491 , 494 Current Concepts in 
Cancer Chemotherapy' (I, II, III, IV) (F: 3-S: 3) 

Pmrip/y/YrPerrnission of instructor 
A laboratory course for juniors and seniors inter- 
ested in learning some of the specific techniques 
of cancer research. Group meetings once a week 
and meetings with each student individually two 
or three times a week. This course may be taken 
for four semesters. It can count for a maximum 
of two upper division electives toward the biol- 



College of Arts & S< n \< i s • Chemistry • 27 



ogy major requirement. Lab fee per semester: 
$ 1 50.00 William D. Sullivan, S.J. 

Bl 496, 498, 492, 497 Seminar in 
Carcinogenesis (I, II, III, IV) (F: 1 -S: 1 ) 

Various biochemical, immunological and thera- 
peutic studies will be reviewed. Required of all 
students enrolled in BI 493-495. 

William D. Sullivan, SJ. 

Bl 506 Recombinant DNA Technology (F: 3) 

This course will describe the theory and practice 
of recombinant DNA technology, and its appli- 
cation within molecular biology research. Top- 
ics will include the cloning of genes from various 
organisms, plasmid construction, transcriptional 
and translational gene fusions, nucleic acid 
probes, site-directed mutagenesis, polymerase 
chain reaction, and transgenic animals. The goal 
of the course is to make the research-oriented 
student aware of the wealth of experimental ap- 
proaches available through this technology. Two 
lectures per week. Charles S. Hoffman 

Bl 510 General Endocrinology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Introductory Biology or permission 

of instructor 

Suggested: Organic Chemistry, Physiology 

Many tissues (e.g., the brain, heart, kidney) as 
well as the "classical" endocrine organs (e.g. ad- 
renal, thyroid) secrete hormones. The course is 
concerned with normal and clinical aspects of 
hormone action. The effects of hormones (and 
neurohormones) on intermediary metabolism, 
somatic and skeletal growth, neural development 
and behavior, development of the gonads and 
sexual identity, mineral regulation and water bal- 
ance, and mechanisms of hormone action will be 
considered. Two 90-minute lectures per week. 

Jolane Solomon 

Bl 515 Biophysical Chemistry (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: BI 440 (or equivalent) and a year each 
of physics and calculus. 

Lectures on the properties and functional in- 
terrelationships of proteins and nucleic acids with 
emphasis on the principal physiochemical tech- 
niques used for the study of macromolecules. 

Donald J. Plocke, S.J. 

Bl 518 Cell Physiology (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry through organic, plus 
Introductory Biology or equivalent. Biochemis- 
try desirable. 

Eucaryotic cells are discussed in the light of 
understanding the chemical makeup and physi- 
ological functioning of their constituent struc- 
tures and organelles. Topics discussed include the 
plasma membrane, cell-cell signaling, the func- 
tioning of the endoplasmic reticulum and related 
organelles, mitochondria, chloroplasts, cell cycles, 
and the rudiments of embryonic development. 
The aim is to integrate the student's biological 
experience in the light of experimental founda- 
tions of our current understanding of cell struc- 
ture and function. Maria Bade 

Bl 519 Fundamentals of Radiation Biology (S:3) 
Prerequisite: Bl 200-202 (or equivalent) 

An introduction to the physical and biologi- 
cal concepts involved in the action of ionizing (and 
non-ionizing) radiations on biological systems. 
The basic principles of radiation detection sys- 
tems and appropriate procedures for the use and 



handling of radionuclides are also covered. Three 
lectures per week. Walter J. Fimian, Jr. 

Bl 538 Biology of Cell Cycle (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

A study of growth and division of exponential, 
synchronous and selected cell cultures will be 
studied. DNA, RNA and protein synthesis in 
procaryotes and eucaryotes during the cycle will 
be discussed. Division controls will also be re- 
viewed. William D. Sullivan, S.J. 

Bl 540 Immunology (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-202, CH 109-1 10 or consent 
of professor 

Emphasizes the biology of the immune re- 
sponse: cell-cell interactions, antibody synthesis 
and diversity, the immunoglobulins, evolution of 
self recognition vs. nonself (antigen), antigenic- 
ity, antibody-antigen reactions, immune protec- 
tion, immune destruction, and problems in can- 
cer and transplantation immunity. Allyn H. Rule 

Bl 548 Comparative Animal Physiology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-202 

This is a course about how animals function 
as well as why they function as they do; thus, stress 
will be laid on problems to animal survival posed 
by the environment in which they live, and on the 
various alternative solutions to those problems 
that have been evolved by different animal groups, 
both vertebrate and invertebrate. The interplay 
of the fitness of the environment and the fitness 
of animals to survive in it will be explored. 

Maria L. Bade 

Bl 550 Biology of Eucaryotic Viruses (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Bl 302 and BI 310 or permission of 
instructor. 

An in-depth examination of the Molecular 
Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of selected 
animal viruses, including recent polio virus, HIV 
(AIDS) and RNA tumor viruses. Recent research 
findings and readings from the current literature. 

The Department 



Bl 554 Principles of Mammalian Physiology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: BI 310 

A study of the fundamental principles and 
physicochemical mechanisms underlying cellular 
and organismal function. Mammalian organ-sys- 
tems will be studied, with emphasis on cardiovas- 
cular, respiratory and renal function and the en- 
docrine regulation of metabolism. Offered bien- 
nially Grant IV. Balkema 

Bl 556 Developmental Biology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 300 or 302 or permission of in- 
structor 

Developmental biology is in the midst of a far- 
reaching revolution that profoundly effects many 
related disciplines including evolutionary biology, 
morphology and genetics. The new tools and 
strategies of molecular biology have begun to link 
genetics and embryology and to reveal an incred- 
ible picture of how cells, tissues and organisms 
differentiate and develop. The course describes 
how both organismal and molecular approaches 
are leading to a detailed understanding of: 1 ) how 
it is that cells containing the same genetic comple- 
ment can reproducibly develop into drastically 
different tissues and organs; and 2) what is the 
basis and role of pattern information in this pro- 
cess. Douglas Powers 

William Petri 

Bl 570 Biology of the Nucleus (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: BI 302 (Principles of Genetic Analy- 
sis), and two semesters of Biochemistry (BI 435 
plus BI 440; or CH 561 plus CH 562);' and per- 
mission of instructor/department. 

This course provides an in-depth treatment of 
the molecular biology of DNA and RNA, with 
particular emphasis on the control and organiza- 
tion of the genetic material of eucaryotic organ- 
isms. Topics covered include chromatin structure, 
DNA replication, nucleosome assembly, introns, 
and RNA processing, and gene regulation. 

Anthony T. Annunziato 



C H 



M I 



FACULTY 

Joseph Bornstein, Professor Emeritus, B.S., 
Boston College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 

Andre J. de Bethune, Professor Emeritus, B.S., 
St. Peter's College; Ph.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity 

Robert F. O'Malley, Professor Emeritus, B.S., 
M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology 

Michael J. Clarke, Professor, A.B., Catholic- 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Paul Davidovits, Professor, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Evan R. Kantrowitz, Professor, A.B., Boston 
University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

T. Ross Kelly, Vanderslice Professor, B.S., Holy 
Cross College; Ph.D., University of California 
at Berkeley 



TRY 



David L. McFadden, Professor, Chairperson of 
the Department ; A.B., Occidental College; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Larry W. McLaughlin, Professor, B.Sc, Uni- 
versity of California at Riverside; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Alberta 

Yuh-kang Pan, Professor, B.S., National Tai- 
wan University; Ph.D., Michigan State Univer- 
sity 

Mary F. Roberts, Professor, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College; Ph.D., Stanford University 

Dennis J. Sardella, Professor, B.S., Boston Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology 

George Vogel, Professor, B.S., D.Sc, Prague 
Technical University 

E.Joseph Billo, Jr., Associate Professor, B.S., 
M.S., Ph.D., McMaster University 



28 • College of Arts & Sciences • Chemistry 



Udayan Mohanty, Associate Professor, B.Sc, 
Cornell University; Ph.D., Brown University 

Martha M. Teeter, Associate Professor, B.A., 
Wellesley College; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University 

James E. Anderson, Assistant Professor, B.S., 
Michigan State University; M.S., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity' of Michigan 

Amir H. Hoveyda, Assistant Professor, B.A., 
Columbia University; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity- 
Lawrence B. Kool, Assistant Professor, B.S., 
University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Chemistry Department offers a flexible cur- 
riculum to those who wish to acquire a knowledge 
of chemistry within the environment of a liberal 
arts college. Two levels of concentration are of- 
fered to the chemistry major. First, there is the 
professional degree program, intended for stu- 
dents who wish to prepare for graduate school as 
well as for those who will enter the chemical pro- 
fession directly from college, leading to a B.S. 
degree certified by the American Chemical Soci- 
ety. Second, there is a degree program requiring 
a somewhat lesser concentration in chemistry for 
those students who wish to combine molecular 
science with intensive studies in other disciplines, 
such as computer science, mathematics, econom- 
ics, social sciences, business, law, humanities, psy- 
chology, medicine, physics or biology. The 
Chemistry Department is approved by the ACS 
Committee on Professional Training. 

The recommended sequence for the Chem- 
istry major is as follows: 

First year: CH 109-110 General Chemistry 
with Laboratory ; PH 211-212 Introduction to 
Physics with Laboratory; MT 102-103 Calculus; 
2 semesters of English; 2 semesters of Core. 

Second year: CH 231-232 Organic Chemistry 
with Laboratory (CH 2 3 3-2 34); CH 3 5 1 Analyti- 
cal Chemistry with Laboratory; CH 222 Intro- 
duction to Inorganic Chemistry with CH 224 
Laboratory; MT 202 Calculus (MT 305 in sec- 
ond semester is recommended); 1 semester of an 
elective; 3 semesters of Core. 

Third year: CI I 575-576 Physical Chemistry; 
CH 555-556 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory; 2 
semesters of Core; 4 semesters of electives. 

Fourth year: (A I 520 Principles of Inorganic 
Chemistry; 7 semesters of electives. 

The above meets the requirement for a B.S. 
degree in Chemistry at Boston College. For the 
degree to be certified by the American Chemical 
Society, two of the electives listed must be ad- 
vanced Chemistry electives (courses numbered 
CH 500-599), except that CI I 561-562 are not 
recommended as advanced electives. Planning 
one's curriculum to meet the ACS certification 
requirement is strongly recommended. 

Biochemistry Major 

Refer to the Biochemistry section of this Catalog 
for a description of this interdisciplinary major. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

An asterisk (*) after a course title indicates that a 
course carries a laboratory fee. 

CH 105-106 Chemistry and Society (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is intended for students who are not 
natural science majors or who do not require a 
laboratory science course. The course includes a 
brief historical introduction to the development 
of chemical principles and theory, followed by a 
discussion of the most important industrial 
chemicals. The second semester is devoted pri- 
marily to organic chemistry, including carbohy- 
drates, fats, proteins and nucleic acids. Although 
not required, a prior knowledge of chemistry at 
the high school level is recommended. The course 
is applicable to the Core requirement. 

The Department 

CH 109-1 10 General Chemistry (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry 
This course is intended for students whose 
major interest is science or medicine. It offers a 
rigorous introduction to the principles of inor- 
ganic chemistry, with special emphasis on quan- 
titative relationships, chemical equilibrium, and 
the structures of atoms, molecules, and crystals. 
The properties of the more common elements 
and compounds are considered against a back- 
ground of these principles and the periodic table. 
The course is applicable to the Core requirement. 
Corequisites CH 1 1 1-112, MT 102-103. 

James E. Anderson 

David L. McFadden 

Udayan Mohanty 

Yuh-kang Pan 

CH 111-112 General Chemistry Laboratory* 
(F:l-S: 1) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in 
CH 109-1 10. One three-hour period per week. 
Lab fee per semester: $ 1 40.00 The Department 

CH 131-132 Contemporary Chemistry (F: 3-S: 3) 

A study of basic chemical principles and a descrip- 
tion of the properties of the elements and com- 
pounds of interest and importance in contempo- 
rary life. More emphasis will be given to organic 
compounds, since they are so pervasive. The 
course is intended for non-science majors for 
whom chemistry or a laboratory science is a re- 
quirement. CH 131 is a prerequisite for CH 132. 
CH 133 and CH 134 are corequisites. 

Pushkar Kaul 

CH 133-134 Contemporary Chemistry 
Laboratory* (F: 1-S: 1) 

A laboratory course that includes experiments il- 
lustrating chemical principles and the properties 
of compounds consistent with CH 131-132. Lab 
fee per semester: $ 1 40.00 The Department 

CH 222 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: CH 351 and 353. 
Corequisite: CH 224 Laboratory 

This course offers an introduction to inor- 
ganic chemistry. Topics to be covered are: prin- 
ciples of structure and bonding, ionic and cova- 
lent bonding, acid-base concepts, coordination 
chemistry, organometallic chemistry, chains and 
rings, and inorganic chemistry in biological sys- 
tems. E. Joseph Billo 



CH 224 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory* (S: 1 ) 

Corequisite: CH 224 Laboratory 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled 
in CH 222. One four-hour period per week. Lab 
fee: $ 1 40.00 E. Joseph Billo 

CH 231-232 Organic Chemistry (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: CH 109-1 10 or 123-125 
Corequisite .- CH 233-234. 

An introduction to the chemistry, properties, 
and uses of organic compounds. Correlation of 
structure with properties, reaction mechanisms, 
and modern approach to structural and synthetic 
problems are stressed throughout. In the labora- 
tory, the aim is acquisition of sound experimen- 
tal techniques through the synthesis of selected 
compounds. Amir H. Hoveyda 

T Ross Kelly 
George Vogel 

CH 233-234 Organic Chemistry Laboratory* 
(F: 1-S: 1) 

Corequisite: CH231-232. 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled 
in CH 231-232. One four-hour period per week. 
Lab fee per semester: $ 1 40.00 Amir H. Hoveyda 

T Ross Kelly 

Dennis J. Sardella 

George Vogel 

CH 351 Analytical Chemistry (F: 4) 

Prerequisite: CH 109-1 10 or CH 1 17-1 18. 
Corequisite: CH 353. 

An introduction to the principles and practice 
of analytical chemistry, including wet chemical 
methods and instrumental methods. In the labo- 
ratory, the aim is the acquisition of precise ana- 
lytical techniques. E. Joseph Billo 

CH 353 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory* (F: 0) 

Corequisite: CH 351-352. 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled 
in CH 351. One four-hour period per week. Lab 
fee per semester: $ 1 40.00 E. Joseph Billo 

CH 391-392 Undergraduate Research (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Two semesters each of Calculus and 
Organic Chemistry, and the consent of the Chair- 
person of the Department. CH 591-592 cannot 
be taken concurrently. 

Undergraduates who have shown exceptional 
ability engage in an independent research project 
under the supervision of a faculty member. The 
experimental work will be preceded by library 
research on the project and training in essential 
laboratory techniques. A written report and an 
oral presentation are required. The Department 

CH 399 Scholar of the College 

See College of Arts and Sciences section of this 
Catalog. 

CH 473 Physical Chemistry (Biochemistry Majors) 

(S:3) 

Prerequisites: CH 231-232, MT 100-101, PH 

211-212 (or equivalent) 

An introduction to physical chemistry. Top- 
ics covered are: thermodynamics, chemical kinet- 
ics, and simple transport processes such as diffu- 
sion and heat conduction. Applications to bio- 
chemical systems are emphasized. 

Mary F. Roberts 



College of Arts & Sciences • Chemistry • 29 



NOTE: Except where noted otherwise, courses 
numbered CH 500 and above have as prerequi- 
sites previous courses in organic, analytical, and 
physical chemistry. 

CH 520 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry (F: 3) 

An introduction to the principles of inorganic 
chemistry with emphasis on structural and ther- 
modynamic aspects. E. Joseph Billo 

CH 532 Introduction to Macromolecular 
Chemistry (S: 3) 

An introduction to the organic and physical 
chemistry of large polymeric molecules. The syn- 
theses of these molecules via condensation, chain 
polymerization, and ring-opening will be covered 
as well as the structures and modifications of natu- 
rally occurring polymers. Physical properties such 
as mechanical and elastic behavior, solubility, and 
solution thermodynamics will be discussed. Fi- 
nally, one lecture will touch upon the interface 
with chemical engineering in the scaling-up of 
chemical processes and also the interface with the 
world of chemical patent law. Lloyd D. Taylor 

CH 538 Organic Spectroscopy (F: 3) 

The theory and applications of infrared, nuclear 
magnetic resonance, mass, and ultraviolet spec- 
troscopy in the determination of the structure of 
organic compounds are discussed. Special effort 
is made in the course to help the student develop 
an ability to arrive at a solution by a logical pro- 
cess starting from only a moderate amount of 
"memorized" data. To this end, a substantial por- 
tion of the course is devoted to interpretation of 
spectra of unknowns, with active class participa- 
tion expected. George Vogel 

CH 545-546 Advanced Principles of Organic 
Chemistry (F: 3-S: 3) 

Fundamental concepts of molecular structure and 
reactivity are at the core of organic chemistry. 
The seemingly limitless variety of transformations 
encountered in organic chemistry can be repre- 
sented by a relatively small number of mechanis- 
tic types. This course will cover concepts of 
chemical bonding and structure and survey the 
major mechanistic categories and the commonly- 
encountered reactive intermediates from the per- 
spective of the organic chemist interested in a 
practical understanding of the relationships be- 
tween structure and reactivity in organic species. 

Lawrence B. Kool 

CH 551 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (S: 3) 

A consideration of modern instrumental methods 
of analysis, including atomic emission and absorp- 
tion, ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and Raman 
spectrometry, fluorometry, x-ray methods, elec- 
troanalytical methods (potentiometry, coulom- 
etry, voltammetry), and gas and liquid chroma- 
tography. James E. Anderson 

CH 555-556 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory* 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This is a two-semester chemistry laboratory 
course designed primarily for juniors and seniors. 
Emphasis will be placed on developing the skills 
and techniques required to perform modern 
chemical experiments. Interpretation and presen- 
tation of data will also be stressed. 

The laboratories will include experiments 
from thermodynamic, kinetic, spectroscopic, elec- 
trochemical, and chromatographic areas. In ad- 



dition, basic experimental techniques, experimen- 
tal design, safe laboratory practices, and identifi- 
cation and estimation of sources of error in mea- 
surements will be included in each experiment. 
May be taken concurrently with CH 575-576 
Physical Chemistry. Lab fee per semester: $140.00 

James E. Anderson 

CH 561-562 Biochemistry l/ll (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: CH 231-232 or equivalent. 

A two-semester introductory-level course in 
Biochemistry. Topics in the first semester con- 
centrate on protein structure and function; bioen- 
ergetics; kinetics and mechanisms of enzyme re- 
actions; intermediary metabolism; control of 
metabolic pathways; and photosynthesis. Topics 
in the second semester concentrate on the struc- 
ture of nucleic acids; recombinant DNA technol- 
ogy; mechanisms of gene rearrangements; DNA 
replication; RNA synthesis and splicing; protein 
synthesis; control of gene expression; membrane 
transport; and hormone action. Experimental 
methods will also be discussed as they relate to 
course topics and to the separate laboratory course 
(CH 563). Evan R. Kantrowitz 

CH 563 Experimental Biochemistry* (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: General Chemistry, Organic Chem- 
istry and Biochemistry 

A laboratory course intended to prepare stu- 
dents for research in the Biochemical Sciences. 
This course will concentrate on the isolation and 
characterization of proteins, enzymes, nucleic 
acids and lipids as well as recombinant DNA tech- 
nology. State-of-the-art instrumentation will be 
used to this end in a laboratory especially designed 
for this course. A variety of experimental tech- 
niques will be used, including electrophoresis, 
chromatography, spectroscopy, and centrifuga- 
tion. As far as possible, data will be collected and 
analyzed directly by computer. Lab fee: $140.00 

Martha M. Teeter 

CH 564 Physical Methods in Biochemistry (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: CH 56 1 or BI 43 5; CH 47 3 or Physi- 
cal Chemistry I (CH 475 or CH 575). 

The course will cover three major techniques 
used in biochemical research: spectroscopy (ab- 
sorption fluorescence, circular dichroism, NMR, 
and EPR), diffraction (X-ray and neutron), and 
microscopy (light and electron). Lectures will 
cover both theory and practical use with examples 
taken from current biochemical literature for the 
latter. Mary F. Roberts 

CH 565 Structure, Function, and Reactivity of 
Nucleic Acids (S: 3) 

Topics discussed in this course will include: 
Nucleoside and nucleic acid (DNA and RNA) 
structure as has been reported using x-ray diffrac- 
tion, NMR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism. 
This includes A, B, C, and Z forms, tRNA, tri- 
plexes, and higher-order structural forms. Addi- 
tional topics include chemical and enzymatic 
nucleic acid synthesis asne sequencing, reactions 
of nucleic acids with metal ions, intercalators, 
electrophiles, and carcinogens. Protein-nucleic 
acid interactions will also be discussed in some 
detail. Functional aspects will be limited to those 
which are related to nucleic acid structure and 
reactivity. This will include topics such as the 
molecular basis of cancer and DNA repair mecha- 
nisms. Larry W. McLaughlin 



CH 566 Bio-inorganic Chemistry (S: 3) 

Discussion of the role of metals in biological sys- 
tems including behavior of metal ions in aqueous 
solution, metal-requiring enzymes, interaction of 
metal ions with nucleic acids, transport systems 
involving inorganic ions, and inorganic pharma- 
ceuticals. Michael J. Clarke 

CH 575 Physical Chemistry I (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: 3 semesters of Calculus, 2 semesters 
of Physics, 2 semesters of Organic Chemistry 

Fundamental principles and applications of 
equilibrium thermodynamics. 

Chemistry graduate students may register for 
this course only if they are advised to do so by the 
Department. Paul Davidovits 

CH 576 Physical Chemistry II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: CH 575 

An introduction to the principles of reaction 
kinetics, kinetic molecular theory, and quantum 
mechanics of atoms and molecules. 

Chemistry students may register for this 
course only if they are advised to do so by the 
Department. Yuh-kang Pan 

CH 579 Introduction to Statistical Mechanics (S: 3) 

The course emphasizes modern tools of statisti- 
cal mechanics: a) Microcanonical, canonical, and 
grand-canonical ensembles: fluctuations in these 
ensembles and applications, b) Perturbation theo- 
ries of classical fluids: simulation (Monte-Carlo 
and Molecular-dynamics) methods in statistical 
mechanics, c) Phase transitions: scaling relations, 
operator product expansions, and Wilson's 
renormalization group approach to critical phe- 
nomena, d) Linear response theory, Onsager's 
regression hypothesis, fluctuation dissipation 
theory, Green-Kubo relations, and Brownian 
motion theory. Udayan Mohanty 

CH 584 Crystal Structure Analysis (F: 3) 

X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis of both 
small molecules and macromolecules. Theoreti- 
cal as well as practical aspects of structure analy- 
sis will be stressed. Subjects include crystal 
growth, crystal lattices and space groups, produc- 
tion and diffraction of X-rays, crystal structure 
solution, refinement, analysis of structures, and 
computer graphic display of structures. Exercises 
and problem sets will supplement the lectures. 

Martha M. Teeter 

CH 591-592 Introduction to Chemical Research 
{F: 3-S: 3) 

The essential feature of this course is an indepen- 
dent research project performed under the super- 
vision of a faculty member. This is a two-semes- 
ter course and may not be taken for only one se- 
mester. The individual work will be preceded by 
a series of lectures and demonstrations on the use 
of the library and several essential laboratory tech- 
niques. A written report is required at the end of 
the second semester. The Department 

CH 593-594 Introduction to Biochemical 
Research (F: 3-S: 3) 

Independent research in Biochemistry to be car- 
ried out under the supervision of a faculty mem- 
ber. This is a two-semester course and may not 
be taken for only one semester. A written report 
and an oral presentation are required at the end 
of the second semester. The two semesters to- 
gether fulfill one advanced Biochemistry elective. 

The Department 



30 • College of Arts & Sciences • Classical Studies 



Classical Studies 



Other courses, offered by the Department on a 

non-periodic basis: 

CH 523 Organometallic Chemistry 

CH 535 Physical Organic Chemistry 

CH 538 Organic Spectroscopy 

CH 539 NMR Spectroscopy 

CH 541 Determination of Organic Structures 

with Laboratory 

CH 567 Protein Structure and Function 

CH 568 Advanced Biochemistry and 
Enzymology 

CH 569 Enzyme Mechanisms 

CH 572 Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy 

CH 573 Quantum Chemistry and Molecular 

Structure 

CH 577 Spectroscopy 

CH 580 Dynamics of Simple Liquids 

CH 581 Electrochemistry 

CH 583 Analytical Separations 



FACULTY 

Dia M.L. Philippides, Professor, B.A., Radcliffe 
College; M.A., Boston College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Princeton University 

Charles F. Ahern, Jr., Associate Professor, 
Chairperson of the Department; B.A., Wesleyan 
University; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Eugene W. Bushala, Associate Professor, B.A., 
Wayne State University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio 
State University 

David H. Gill, S.J., Associate Professor, B.A., 
M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity; Lie. Theology, St. Georgen, Frankfurt- 
am-Main 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

There are several programs in Classical Studies. 
They approach a liberal education through the 
study, both in original languages and in English, 
of two literatures which have exercised a profound 
influence in the formation of Western culture: the 
ancient Greek and the ancient Roman. 

The Department offers courses under three 
headings. 1) Courses in elementary and interme- 
diate Latin and Greek, designed to teach a stu- 
dent to read the languages. 2) Courses in Greek 
and Roman literature and culture, taught in En- 
glish and designed to acquaint a student broadly 
with the ancient world. Through cooperation 
with other departments courses are available also 
in ancient history, art, philosophy, and religion. 
3) Advanced reading courses in ancient authors 
and genres, taught in the original languages. 

There are four different ways in which a stu- 
dent may major in Classical Studies. The require- 
ments for each are as follows: 
Major in Classics: 1 2 courses. Ten courses must be 
in the original languages and may include a maxi- 
mum of two elementary courses. The other two 
courses may be taken either in the original lan- 
guages or in related areas of ancient studies. 
Major in Latin: 10 courses. Seven courses must be 
taken in Latin above the elementary level. The 
other three courses may be taken in Greek or in 
related areas of ancient studies. 
Major in Greek: 10 courses. Seven courses must 
be taken in Greek above the elementary level. The 
other three courses may be taken in Latin or in 
related areas of ancient studies. 
Major in Classical Civilization: 12 courses. The 
courses fall into two broad areas, language and 
culture, with a somewhat greater emphasis on the 
latter. Requirements: 

(a) Six courses in Latin and Greek, including 
at least two above the elementary level. 

(b) Six (or more) courses in the areas of an- 
cient history, art, philosophy, religion, mythol- 
ogy, etc. 

Several courses which apply to the various 
major programs in Classical Studies are offered 
in other departments, for instance, in History, 



Philosophy, Fine Arts, Slavic, Romance Lan- 
guages, Political Science, and Theology. A stu- 
dent should consult at registration time with 
Departmental advisors in Classics before select- 
ing courses. The Department also offers courses 
in Modern Greek language and literature. 

Minor in Modern Greek Studies 

The Department also administers a minor in 
Modern Greek Studies. For information see the 
"Minors" section at the front of this Catalog, or 
contact the Director of the Minor Program, Prof. 
Eugene W. Bushala, Carney 124, (x4935). 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

I. Elementary and Intermediate 
Languages 

CL 010-01 1 Elementary Latin (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will introduce the fundamentals of 
Latin grammar and vocabulary. The aim is to 
prepare a student to read simple Latin prose. 

Maria Kakavas 

Sister Mary Daniel O'Keeffe 

John Shea 

CL 020-02 1 Elementary Ancient Greek (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will introduce the fundamentals of 
ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary. The aim 
is to prepare a student to read something like 
Plato's Apology after a year's study. 

Kenneth Rothwell 

CL 052-053 Intermediate Ancient Greek 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

A review of the essentials of Classical Attic gram- 
mar and a close reading of selections from Greek 
literature, normally Xenophons Anabasis, Plato's 
Apology and/or Crito and Euripides' Medea. Spe- 
cial provision will be made to meet the needs of 
students of Philosophy (e.g. more Plato) and 
Theology (e.g. New Testament instead of classical 
authors.) Dia M.L. Philippides 

John Shea 

CL 056-057 Intermediate Latin (F: 3-S: 3) 

A thorough review of essential grammatical forms 
presented in Elementary Latin along with a close 
reading of an introductory selection of Roman 
prose and poetry. Eugene W. Bushala 

Kenneth Rothwell 
John Shea 

CL 060-061 Elementary Modern Greek 

An introduction to the study of Demotic Greek. 
This course will introduce the fundamentals of 
grammar and will focus on reading ability, oral 
comprehension, and oral expression. Class in- 
struction is supplemented by required laboratory 
work.. Offered alternate years Maria Kakavas 

CL 070-071 Intermediate Modern Greek 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Elementary Modern Greek or 
equivalent 

This second-year course in the Modern Greek 
language will enable the student to enjoy the read- 
ing of representative contemporary writers such 



College of Arts & Sciences • Classical Studies • 31 



as Kazantzakis, Myrivilis, Seferis, Samarakis, 
Tachtsis and Elytis. Maria Kakavas 

II. Greek and Roman Culture 

The reading for these courses is entirely in En- 
glish, and no acquaintance with the Greek or 
Latin language is presumed. A student who wishes 
to do some of the reading in the original languages 
may consult the instructor. 

CL 101 Introduction to the Modern Greek World 
IS: 3) 

An introduction to the geography, history, litera- 
ture, religion, art, politics, and culture of contem- 
porary Greece. This course aims at presenting an 
overall view and sensitive understanding of the 
current state of the country, taking into account 
Greece's liminal position between East and West, 
her recent attachment to the European Commu- 
nity, and the strong residual tradition of ancient 
Greece and Byzantium. The course is offered 
entirely in English. It serves as an excellent prepa- 
ration for anyone seriously interested in visiting 
Greece and seeing beyond the walls of the Hilton 
Hotel. It also forms a basis for any further study 
of Greece, and offers a bird's-eye view of the new 
integrated Europe of 1992. Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 1 10 Medical Terminology (F: 3) 

A study of the formation, meaning, and use of 
scientific terminology intended primarily for bi- 
ology, pre-medical and pre-dental students. The 
subject matter will be those prefixes, suffixes, and 
stems of Greek and Latin words appropriated in 
the creation of English scientific vocabulary. No 
prerequisites. The only requirements are a text- 
book, an active memory, and noteworthy atten- 
dance. The course material will involve some 
simple linguistic principles of word formation. 
The prime concern will be to teach the rudiments 
of scientific terminology so that the student will 
be able to perceive at a glance the components of 
chiefly biological and medical words. 

Students who have taken EN 572 or CL 1 12 
may not take this course. Eugene IV. Bushala 

CL 1 75 Modern Greek Novels and Short Stories 

A survey of highlights of Greek prose-writing 
starting with 1 9th century works such as Pope Joan 
(E. Roidis) and "My Mother's Sin" (G. Vizyenos), 
continuing through the turn of the century with 
The Murderess (A. Papadiamantis), Life in the Tomb 
(S. Myrivilis), Zorba the Greek (N. Kazantzakis), 
and concentrating mostly on contemporary works 
including The Plant, The Well, The Angel (V. 
Vassilikos, author of Z), The Third Wedding (K. 
Taktsis), "Fifty-fifty to Love" (from The Double 
Book of D. Hatzis), "The Dogs of Seikh-Sou" (G. 
Ioannou), The Flaw and short stories (A. 
Samarakis). The course is offered entirely in En- 
glish. Offered alternate years. Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 1 76 Modern Greek Drama 

A survey of highlights of modern Greek drama 
beginning with the remarkable plays of the Cretan 
Renaissance (e.g., the tragedy Erofili), and center- 
ing mainly on the 20th century, with plays such 



as Tragedy-Comedy (N. Kazantzakis), The Court- 
yard of Miracles (I. Kambanellis), The City (L. 
Anagnostaki), The Ear of Alexander (K. 
Mourselas), The Wedding Band (D. Kehaides), The 
Match (G Maniotes). The discontinuity from the 
ancient Greek theater may be discussed and a 
reading performance may be planned. The course 
is offered entirely in English. Offered alternate years 

Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 1 86 Greek Civilization (F: 3) 

After a brief survey of early Greek history, the 
course will focus on the distinctive achievements 
of Athens at her creative peak in the fifth century 
BCE: the development and working of the Athe- 
nian Democracy; the drama (Aeschylus, 
Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes); the Peri- 
clean building program (Parthenon, etc.); the 
beginnings of philosophy (the Sophists and 
Socrates); the rise and fall of the Athenian Em- 
pire (Herodotus and Thucydides). Reading will 
be mostly from the original sources (in transla- 
tion). No prerequisites. Kenneth Rothwell 

CL 202 Classical Greek Drama in Translation 

(S:3) 

Selected plays from 5th-century Attic drama, in- 
cluding most likely Aeschylus' Oresteia trilogy, 
Sophocles' Antigone and Oedipus Rex, Euripides' 
Medea, Hippolytus and Bacchae, Aristophanes' Frogs 
and Lysistrata, will be read in English. Secondary 
readings, visual materials, video tapes of perfor- 
mances and slides, and discussion will focus on the 
development of classical drama, the ancient the- 
ater, stagecraft, and contemporary society, includ- 
ing the roles of men and women and issues of jus- 
tice, heroism and ethics. 

This course would be of interest to students 
of the theater, English and other literatures in- 
fluenced by the form and content of classical 
drama. 

For students of the Classics provision may be 
made for reading certain portions in Greek. 

Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 212 (FA 212) Art of the Ancient 
Mediterranean World (F: 3) 

The visual history and arts of the Ancient Medi- 
terranean world will be studied from the rise of 
civilizations along the Nile, in the Holy Land, and 
Mesopotamia to the fall of the western Roman 
Empire, about 480. Cities, sacred areas, palaces, 
and building for communication, civic services 
and war will be included, as well as painting, sculp- 
ture, jewelry, and coinages. 

The fall term will begin with Egypt and 
Mesopotamia, and will emphasize Greek Art, 
through Philip and Alexander the Great, to the 
beginning of the Roman Empire. 

The spring term will be devoted to Roman Art 
in its broadest sense, beginning with the Helle- 
nistic world after Alexander the Great and mov- 
ing to Etruscan and Greek Italy in the Roman 
Republic, and then to the Roman Empire. 

Cornelius Vermeule 



CL 21 7 The Ancient Epic in Translation (S: 3) 

A study of the Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer and 
the Aeneid of Vergil as masterpeices of western 
literature. Emphasis on thematic and narrative 
structure and the epic hero. Lectures and discus- 
sion. Eugene W. Bushala 

CL 232 Ancient Comedy (F: 3) 

Study of the origins and development of stage 
comedy in Greece and Rome, with attention to 
its influence on later comedy. The readings will 
include selections from the work of Aristophanes 
(e.g., Clouds, Lysistrata), Menander (The Grouch), 
Plautus (e.g., The Braggart Soldier, Pseudolus), and 
Terence (The Eunuch), with supplementary read- 
ings in Shakespeare, Moliere, and Congreve. We 
shall talk about humor, but also about what can 
be said of a comedy aside from its being funny: 
what are its typical themes and settings? how do 
the comedies of succeeding periods differ from 
one another? how, socially and psychologically, 
does a comedy differ from a tragedy? If time per- 
mits, we shall also experiment with staging scenes 
in class, and discuss the resemblances between 
traditional stage comedy and contemporary com- 
edy as seen in movies and television. 

Charles Ahem 

CL 262 Roman Civilization (S: 3) 

After a survey of the broad outlines of Roman 
history, the course will focus on selected topics 
that illustrate the character of life in the early 
Roman empire — the years of the Roman Peace. 
Among these topics are family life, social stratifi- 
cation, mythology and religion (including the 
growth of Christianity in a pagan culture), politi- 
cal institutions and social attitudes, art (including 
pornography), law, literature, economic life (in- 
cluding slavery), and popular entertainment (the 
infamous shows). The aim of the course will be 
to look not so much at the monumental achieve- 
ment of Roman imperial government as at the 
varied texture of life under that government. 

Charles Ahern 

CL 274 Advanced Topics in Modern Greek IV 

(S:3) 

A seminar introducing its participants to advanced 
methods of reading and research in Modern 
Greek Studies, usually leading to the production 
of a term paper. 

The course may be repeated for credit as its 
content varies each time it is given. This year the 
course will center on Modern Greek plays. 

Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 280 Currents in Modern Greek Literature 

(F:3) 

A survey of highlights from Modern Greek litera- 
ture examining in each case, as appropriate, some 
of the following factors: the "Greekness" of the 
work, its debt to the Ancient (pagan) and Byzan- 
tine (Christian) Tradition, the crosscurrents ar- 
riving from East and West, the influence of con- 
temporary political, artistic, and societal condi- 
tions. Works to be studied might include: 
Martinengou's My Story, Vizyenos' "My Mother's 



32 • College oe Arts & Sicences • Communication and Theater 



Sin," Myrivilis' Life in the Tomb, Kazantzakis' 
Zorba the Greek, poems of the Nobel prize win- 
ning authors Seferis and Elytis, Kotzias' The Jag- 
uar or Zei's Achilles' Fiancee. 

Presenting striking examples of a modern 
European literature, the course lends a standpoint 
for comparative study. It will pay attention to the 
depiction and voices of Greek men and women 
and incorporate discussion of what works have 
been translated into English. 

The course is offered entirely in English, 
though it also forms an elective towards the Mi- 
nor in Modern Greek Studies. No knowledge of 
the Modern Greek language is necessary, but pro- 
vision may be made for those wishing to read cer- 
tain texts in Greek. Dia ALL. Philipppides 

CL 333 Apuleius (F: 3) 

Reading and discussion of Apuleius' serio-comic 
novel Metamorphoses (or The Golden Ass). Among 
the readings will be several "Ephisika" (short sto- 
ries on preternatural themes), the philosophizing 
allegory of the marriage of Cupid and Psyche, 
stories about the experience of Lucius (the hero) 
when changed into an ass, and the story of Lucius' 
conversion to Isiac religion. We shall consider 
both the literary character of the novel and its 
character as a document of Roman social and re- 
ligious values. Charles Ahern 

CL 348 Catullus (F: 3) 

Reading and discussion of selected poems. 

Eugene W. Bushala 

CL 376 Advanced Reading Course: Ancient 
Greek Drama (F: 3) 

Reading in Greek of selected plays by different 
playwrights. Discussion of the nature and back- 
ground of Greek drama and study of individual 
distinctions in approach and style. 

Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 382 Herodotus (S: 3) 

Reading of selections from the Histories and study 
of major historical and cultural themes. 

Kenneth Rothwell 

CL 450 Roman Elegy (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: At least two years of college Latin or 
the approval of the department. 

This course will cover a considerable portion 
of the elegiac poems of Tibullus, Propertius, and 
Ovid, investigating the genre of Roman elegiac 
poetry and the individual contributions of each 
poet. The method will be translation, lecture and 
discussion. Eugene W. Bushala 

III. Advanced Reading Courses 

These courses presume an ability to read Latin or 
Greek above the intermediate level; reading is 
primarily in the original languages, unless an in- 
structor makes other arrangements. 

CL 320 (TH 423) Seminar in Latin Patrology (S: 3) 

See course description under TH 423. 

Margaret Schatkin 

CL 323 (TH 425) Seminar in Greek Patrology 

(F:3) 

See course description under TI I 425. 

Margaret Schatkin 

CL 390-391 Readings and Research (F: 3-S: 3) 

The Department 



Communication and Theater 



FACULTY 

Mary T. Kinnane, Professor Emeritus, A.B., 
H.Dip. Ed., Liverpool University; A.M., Uni- 
versity of Kansas; Ph.D., Boston College 

Joseph M. Larkin, S.J., Associate Professor 
Emeritus, A.B., Boston College; A.M., Catholic 
University; S.T.B., Weston College 

Marilyn J. Matelski, Professor; A.B., Michigan 
State University; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Colorado 

Ann Marie Barry, Associate Professor, B.S., 
M.A., Salem State College; M.S., Ph.D., Bos- 
ton University 

Donald Fishman, Associate Professor; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota; M.A., Ph.D., Northwest- 
ern University 

Stuart J. Hecht, Associate Professor, B.A., Uni- 
versity of Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., Northwest- 
ern University 

Dale A. Herbeck, Associate Professoi', B.A., 
Augustant College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Iowa 

J. Paul Marcoux, Associate Professor, Assistant 
Chairperson of Theater Studies; B.S., Fitchburg 
State College; M.Ed., Boston University; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Dorman Picklesimer, Jr., Associate Professor; 

A.B., Morehead State University; A.M., Bowl- 
ing Green State University; Ph.D., Indiana 
University 

William James Willis, Associate Professor, 
Chairperson of the Department; B.A., University 
of Oklahoma; M.A., East Texas State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Missouri 

Kevin M. Carragee, Assistant Professor, B.A., 
Adelphi University; M.A., Shippensburg State 
University; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst 

Janet Chambers, Assistant Professor, B.F.A., 
University of Tennessee; M.F.A., University of 
Illinois 

Lisa Cuklanz, Assistant Professor, B.S., Duke 
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Denis Moran, S.J., Assistant Professor, B.A., 
Fordham University; M.F.A., Catholic Univer- 
sity; M.Div., Woodstock College of Theology; 
M.Ed., Teachers College of Columbia Univer- 
sity; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Gail Ann McGrath, Lecturer, A.B., Heidelberg 
University; A.M., Bowling Green State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Boston College 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department of Communication and Theater 
(formerly Speech Communication and Theater) 
offers a major for undergraduates in two separate 
areas: Communication and Theater Arts. 

Communication 

The objective of the major in Communication is 
to provide students with a critical understanding 
of the nature, scope, and function of communi- 
cation. Courses are designed to examine varying 
theoretical perspectives, historical developments, 
technological changes, and the expanding role 
that communication plays in modern life. In ad- 
dition, courses are intended to provide students 
with an opportunity to acquire skills in speaking, 
writing, and critical thinking. 

The Department recently has been re-named 
and a new curriculum has been adopted. Although 
the new curriculum will be phased in during the 
next few years, several changes are already in 
place. Several new courses have been added to the 
curriculum; some courses have been eliminated. 
Still other courses have been renumbered or 
retitled. 

Requirements for the Major in Communication 

Students must complete eleven (11) courses to 
major in Communication. Six (6) of the courses 
are required. These courses are: 1) CO 010, The 
Rhetorical Tradition; 2) CO 020, Survey of Mass 
Communication; 3) CO 030, Public Speaking; 4) 
1 Theory Course (any course numbered between 
CO 370-380 meets this requirement); 5) 2 Writ- 
ing Intensive Seminars (any course numbered 
between CO 425-475 meets this requirement.) 

The other five (5) courses are electives, and 
students may select these courses based upon their 
interests and objectives. CO 010, The Rhetori- 
cal Tradition, and CO 020, Survey of Mass Com- 
munication, are prerequisites for registering for 
other courses in the Department. 

Honors Program 

The Department offers an honors program in 
Communication that begins in the second semes- 
ter of the student's junior year. The honors se- 
quence is a two-semester program. The first se- 
mester (second semester of the junior year) is 
devoted to data collection, research design, and 
framing research questions. The program culmi- 
nates with the writing of an honors thesis during 
the first semester of the senior year. Students who 
wish to participate in the Department's honors 
program should have a cumulative grade point 
average of 3.4. 

Internship Program 

The Department offers an internship program in 
mass communication. The internship program is 
open to all Communication majors who have 
achieved a 3.0 or better, and who have completed 
the prerequisite course work. Prerequisite courses 
are CO 020 and CO 030, and relevant courses in 
the area of the internship. A minimum of six 
courses must be completed in the major before a 
student will be eligible to intern. Majors begin 
their internship during the first semester of their 
senior year. 



College of Arts & Sciences • Communication and Theater • 33 



Declaring a Major 

Students who are freshmen may declare a major 
in Communication at any time during their fresh- 
men year. Students who are sophomores must 
complete two courses in Communication before 
they will be permitted to add a major in Commu- 
nication. All questions about declaring a major 
should be directed toward the Chairperson of the 
Department. 

Theater 

The Theater program in the Department is de- 
signed to introduce students in a systematic fash- 
ion to a wide range of knowledge associated with 
the various arts and crafts of theater as well as the 
theory, history, and criticism of dramatic litera- 
ture. The Theater major provides a solid foun- 
dation in theatrical study by balancing coursework 
with actual production work. Students are encour- 
aged to explore, express, and test ideas and forms 
learned in the classroom through production on 
the University stage. 

Theater Requirements for the Classes of 
1993, 1994 and 1995 

Students must complete eleven (11) courses plus 
an additional two credits worth of Theater Pro- 
duction Laboratory. Four (4) of the courses are 
required. These courses are: 1) Elements of The- 
ater Production (which must be taken along with 
CT 145, Theater Production Laboratory I); 2) 
CT 153, Elements of Design for the Stage (which 
must be taken along with CT 245, Theater Pro- 
duction Laboratory II); 3) CT 275, History of 
Theater I; 4) CT 276, History of Theater II. The 
remaining seven (7) courses may then be selected 
from the following four areas in the curriculum: 
1) Performance and Directing, 2) Theater Pro- 
duction, 3) Theater History, Criticism and Lit- 
erature, and 4) Advanced Theater courses. At least 
two courses must be chosen from the Perfor- 
mance area, and a student must have junior sta- 
tus before enrolling in the Advanced Theater 
courses. It is strongly urged that majors meet with 
a faculty advisor in theater as early as possible. 
Such meetings are designed to discuss curriculum 
options, production requirements, and career 
opportunities. 

Theater Requirements for the Class of 1 996 

Students must complete eleven (11) courses plus 
an additional eight credits worth of Theater Pro- 
duction Laboratory. Five (5) of the courses are 
required. These courses are: 1) CT 060, Introduc- 
tion to Theater; 2) CT 140, Elements of Theater 
Production (which must be taken along with CT 
145, Theater Production Laboratory I); 3) CT 
275, History of Theater I; 4) CT 276, History of 
Theater II; 5) CT 101, Acting I. These five basic 
classes form the foundation for advanced course 
work. Those classes requiring permission of in- 
structor may give preference to those who have 
completed these five courses. Therefore, students 
are urged to complete all by the end of their 
sophomore year. 

Of the six full-credit courses left to complete 
the major: 1) Students must pick two (2) upper- 
level departmental theater courses in theater his- 



tory, criticism and/or dramatic literature (courses 
which meet this requirement are numbered from 
CT 360 to CT 379, and CT 460 to CT 479). 2) 
Students must also pick two (2) upper-level de- 
partmental courses in performance and/or pro- 
duction (courses which meet this requirement are 
numbered from CT 301 to CT 359, and CT 401 
to CT 459.) The remaining two (2) are electives 
and students may select these courses based upon 
their interests and needs. 

As mentioned above, students are required to 
complete eight credits worth of Theater Produc- 
tion Laboratory beyond their course require- 
ments in order to graduate with a major in The- 
ater. Credits are only awarded for working on 
Boston College Department of Theater produc- 
tions. Two of the eight may be earned through 
substantial performance work (arranged in ad- 
vance with the Department); otherwise, all eight 
can only be in the technical area. Most Theater 
Production Laboratory courses are worth one (1) 
credit; only CT 445 is worth two (2) credits. 
Therefore, students should be prepared to take 
between six and eight Theater Production Labo- 
ratory courses during their four years at Boston 
College. See the course descriptions for further 
information. 

Incoming freshmen are strongly encouraged 
to take both the Introduction to Theater class, and 
the Elements of Theater Production class (with 
its accompanying lab course) in their first semes- 
ter. Furthermore, it is strongly urged that majors 
in the Class of 1996 meet with a faculty advisor 
in theater as early as possible. 

Theater and the University Core 

Please note that only two theater courses can now 
be used to meet the University's Core curriculum 
requirements: CT 060 (Introduction to Theater), 
and CT 065 (Performance Studies I: Literature 
of the Mind). 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
Communication 

CO 010 The Rhetorical Tradition (F, S: 3) 

This is an introductory course that is designed to 
examine the evolution of rhetorical principles 
during the classical, Renaissance, and modern 
periods. The course focuses on pivotal concepts 
in rhetoric, and their application to contemporary 
discourse. This is a foundation course in the field 
of communication. It introduces students to pe- 
rennial issues and concerns in rhetoric, and looks 
at communication as a way of knowing about self 
and society. Lisa Cuklanz 

Gail McGrath 
Dorman Picklesimer, Jr. 

CO 020 Survey of Mass Communication (F, S: 3) 

This is a survey course in mass communication. 
It explores the political, social, and cultural forces 
that have influenced the development of the me- 
dia. Among the topics discussed are media history, 
governmental regulation of the media, constitu- 
tional issues related to the First Amendment, 
media economics, the character of mass media 



content, and the organizational decision-making 
process within media institutions. This is a re- 
quired course for all communication majors. 

Kevin M. Cairagee 
Donald Fishman 

CO 030 Public Speaking [F, S: 3) 

This course is intended to be an introduction to 
the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism 
of speeches. Attention is devoted to the four key 
elements of the speech situation: message, 
speaker, audience, and occasion. Emphasis in the 
course is also given to different modes of speak- 
ing and a variety of speech types, such as persua- 
sive, ceremonial, and expository addresses. This 
is a performance as well as a theory course. The 
course is required for all communication majors. 

The Department 

CO 080 (CH 151) The Science and Technology 
of Communication (S: 3) 

This course deals with the evolution and opera- 
tion of communication technology. Its aim is to 
acquaint students with the development and func- 
tioning of technologies which have been the most 
influential in shaping society. Among the topics 
addressed are: the telegraph, the telephone, mod- 
ern radio, television, semiconductors, microwave 
communication, and lasers. A previous scientific 
background is not necessary for an understand- 
ing of the course. This is a Core course. 

Paul Davidovits 

CO 104 Interpersonal Communication (F, S: 3) 

This course is based upon the premise that most 
of the communication in which people engage is 
interpersonal rather than public. It relates more 
closely to the day-to-day communication needs 
of contemporary society. Student participation in 
this course ranges from dyadic (one-to-one) com- 
munications to formal situations. The course is 
divided into three sections: 1) know self, 2) know 
others, and 3) know the message. Both verbal and 
nonverbal communication techniques are 
stressed. Dorman Picklesimer, Jr. 

CO 105 Debate (F, S: 3) 

This course introduces the student to the theory 
and practice of debate. It is designed for students 
without any formal training in debate. Assign- 
ments include participation in three class debates, 
preparation of affirmative and negative argu- 
ments, and compilation of an evidence file and 
annotated bibliography on the debate topic. 

John Katsulas 

CO 1 07 Voice and Articulation for the Electronic 
Media (F, S: 3) 

This course is designed for students interested in 
building toward a level of vocalization acceptable 
for professional radio and television performance. 
Attention will be given to all aspects of voice pro- 
duction including rate, pitch, volume, tone, and 
clear and accurate articulation which adheres to 
the General American Standard. Extensive use 
will be made of tape recordings for practice, self 
analysis and instructor evaluation. The Interna- 
tional Phonetic Alphabet will be employed as the 
basic tool. This course is not appropriate for in- 
dividuals with speech deficiencies. Gail McGrath 



34 • College of Ar i s & S< n nces • Communication \\d Tin vter 



CO 220 Radio Production (F: 3) 

This course is designed to present an overview of 
basic audio theory, programming and production 
techniques, station management and radio's re- 
lationship to the record industry. Students must 
meet for a one-hour lab period each week in ad- 
dition to the two-hour lecture periods. 

Marilyn Matelski 

CO 222 Studio Television Production (F, S: 3) 

This course is designed to introduce students to 
the tools and techniques of television production. 
Attention is given to the planning and production 
skills necessary for effective communication in 
television. To pursue these goals, a substantial 
portion of the course will be devoted to learning 
production skills in a television studio. 

David Corkum 

Paul Reynolds 

William Stanwood 

CO 227 Broadcast Writing (F, S: 3) 

This course introduces the student to a broad 
sampling of broadcast writing styles. Areas of fo- 
cus will include news, sports, documentaries, 
commercials, public service announcements, edu- 
cational television, and writing for specialized 
audiences. A special emphasis will be placed on 
dramatic and comedy writing in the final third of 
this course. Patricia Dclaney 

Jajnes Dun ford 
William Stanwood 

CO 230 News Writing (F, S: 3) 

An introduction to reporting for the print media, 
this course examines 1) techniques of interview- 
ing and observation, 2) the news value of events, 
and 3) the organizational forms and writing styles 
used by newspapers. Course work includes fre- 
quent story assignments. Students will be ex- 
pected to read a newspaper daily. Maureen Goss 

Richard Kelley 
James Willis 

CO 231 Feature Writing (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: CO 230, News Writing 

This course focuses upon feature writing for 
newspapers and magazines. Frequent story assign- 
ments, regular newspaper reading, and leaving 
campus to cover stories are required. 

Maureen Goss 

CO 235 Advertising (F: 3) 
I his course explores advertising as an institution 
in society, both as a marketing tool and as a com- 
munication process. Designed as a comprehensive 
view of the subject, the course includes such top- 
ics as: advertising regulation, the role of advertis- 
ing in the marketing mix, the organization of the 
advertising agency, marketing/advertising re- 
search and the creative uses of various advertis- 
ing media. Students will participate in the formu- 
lation of a comprehensive advertising campaign 
plan. . Inn Marie Barry 

CO 236 Ad Copy and Layout (F: 3) 
Prerequisite: CO 2 35, Advertising; permission of 

instructor. 

This course is designed to promote an under- 
standing of effective creative work in advertising 
through the study of basic visual design concepts 
and the production of advertisements in a variety 
of media, including newspapers, magazines, direct 
mail, catalogs, and out-of-home vehicles. Stu- 



dents will produce creative work in both semi- 
comprehensive and comprehensive layouts, cri- 
tique their own work and that of others, and de- 
velop a final creative campaign for inclusion in an 
advertising portfolio. Cost of materials should be 
factored into the decision to take this course. 
Enrollment is limited. Ann Marie Barry 

CO 240 Public Relations (F, S: 3) 

This course is designed to be an examination of 
the technical, counseling, and planning elements 
in public relations. Attention in the course will 
focus on public relations campaigns, non-profit 
public relations, and the often complex relation- 
ship between management strategies and promo- 
tional objectives. Emphasis will also be placed on 
developing proper writing techniques for public 
relations. Included among the writing assign- 
ments will be a press release, planning statement, 
contact sheet, and a press kit. Donald Fishman 

Karen Kelly 
Lynda McKinney 

CO 260 American Public Address I (F: 3) 

This course is dedicated to the proposition that 
"History is made with words." Thus, this course 
will concentrate on the major issues that chal- 
lenged the United States Constitution: Abolition, 
Women's Rights and Suffrage, Immigration, the 
Rise of Evangelism, and the Progressive Move- 
ment that framed 20th-century American 
thought. Lectures and discussions will focus on 
the major personalities and their speeches. Stu- 
dents will integrate theories of rhetorical criticism 
with the speeches and the causes they support 

Dontian Picklesimer, Jr. 

CO 261 American Public Address II (S: 3) 

This course is a sequel to CO 260 — although it is 
not necessary to have completed CO 260 to en- 
roll in CO 261. This course concentrates on the 
major speeches and speakers who molded Ameri- 
can thought from the Cold War to the present. 
Theories of rhetorical criticism will be integrated 
in the evaluation of major speeches selected by the 
students. Although not required for admission to 
the course, the completion of the Public Speak- 
ing and/or Rhetorical Criticism courses is recom- 
mended. Dorvian Picklesimer, Jr. 

CO 290 (PO 349) Politics and the Media (F, S: 3) 

An analysis of the mass media's impact on the 
workings of the American political system. Ex- 
plored will be such topics as the media's interac- 
tion with political institutions, its role in cam- 
paigning, its use by office holders and politicians, 
its effect upon recent events in the political arena, 
e.g., its treatment of terrorism, violence, riots, etc. 

Marie Nato/i 

CO 295 Political Communication (F, S: 3) 

Political communication occurs in all societies in 
many forms and with varying results. This course 
will explore the diversity of styles, forms, and ef- 
fects of political communication, both in the 
United States and abroad. Marie Natoli 

Theory Courses 

CO 370 Media Effects Theory (F, S: 3) 

This course will explore current theoretical per- 
spectives that inform mass communication re- 
search examining media effects and uses. The 
theoretical perspectives examined include culti- 
vation research, agenda-setting research, uses and 



gratifications research and neo-Marxist analyses 
of the media's influence. By the end of the semes- 
ter, students should have developed a critical un- 
derstanding of the role and influence of the mass 
media in American society. Kevin Cairagee 

CO 376 Rhetorical Theory (S: 3) 

This course applies the concepts of critical rhe- 
torical theory to the analysis of news media. Stu- 
dents select a contemporary event or problem in 
the news and develop a five-stage project culmi- 
nating in a 20-25 page research paper. 

Lisa Cuklanz 

Writing-Intensive Seminars 

CO 427 Culture, Communication and Power 

(S:3) 

This course will examine the interaction between 
culture, communication and power. We will study 
and discuss, for example, the role of cultural prod- 
ucts in the definition of social and political rela- 
tions. A number of theoretical perspectives will 
inform our study of mass-mediated artifacts, in- 
cluding feminist theory, semiology, cultural stud- 
ies perspectives and neo-Marxist theories. Simi- 
larly, we will discuss a variety of cultural products, 
for example, novels, magazines, advertisements 
and television programs. Kevin Carragee 

CO 428 News, Politics and Knowledge (F: 3) 

This seminar examines news as a form of social 
knowledge. It examines how the American news 
media define domestic and international politics. 
It examines the creative and organizational pro- 
cesses that contribute to the production of news. 
One aim of the seminar is to develop an under- 
standing of the social, political and economic 
forces that shape American journalism. The fo- 
cus is primarily, though not exclusively, on tele- 
vision news. Kevin Carragee 

CO 442 Intercultural Communication (F: 3) 

The purpose of this course is to focus on 
intercultural and international communication of 
today and tomorrow. It will be divided into three 
basic areas: 1) subcultural communication in 
America; 2) intra- and inter-cultural differences 
in other societies; and 3) international communi- 
cation — its successes and failures. Comparative 
broadcasting systems in each society will be dis- 
cussed as well as case studies of specific countries. 

Marilyn Matelski 

CO 450 Freedom of Speech (F, S: 3) 

This course is designed to examine the evolving 
interpretation of freedom of speech from the 
American Revolutionary War to the Persian Gulf 
War. The focus of the course is on the intellec- 
tual, political, and social factors that influenced 
varying conceptions of freedom of expression. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the develop- 
ment of First Amendment doctrines during 
World War I as well as the abridgement of civil 
liberties during that war. In addition, the course 
will examine the changing forum for free speech 
litigation from the states to the federal courts and 
the transformation in free speech thinking from 
protecting majority interests to safeguarding the 
rights of minorities. Donald Fishman 

CO 451 Gender Roles and Communication 
(F, S: 3) 

This course is both a writing intensive seminar 
and a women's studies course. Focus is on the 



College of Arts & Sciences • Communication and Theater • 35 



social construction of gender through communi- 
cation. The early section of the course compares 
historical and cross-cultural notions of gender. 
Then, building on these comparisons, students 
read about, examine, and analyze communication 
texts, focusing particularly on television program- 
ming and advertising. Students are encouraged to 
develop a sense of themselves as active participants 
in the social construction of gender rather than 
as passive consumers and receivers of mass medi- 
ated communication. Lisa Cuklanz 

CO 457 Campaign Rhetoric (F: 3) 

This course is designed to investigate the impact 
of presidential campaign rhetoric on voter behav- 
ior. Students will be asked to utilize principles of 
rhetoric to objectively evaluate speeches and de- 
bates read, heard and/or seen. Study will focus on 
the rhetoric of presidential elections from 1952 
to the present with primary emphasis on the cur- 
rent campaign. The goal is critical listening: The 
method will be predominantly discussion. Prepa- 
ration to participate is required. Gail McGrath 

CO 470 (UN 510) Capstone: Conflict, Decision 
and Communication (F: 3) 

This seminar focuses on inevitable questions 
which underlie most undergraduate study and 
which form the basis for critical decision-making 
throughout our lives. Reading, viewing and dis- 
cussion will center on inner- and outer-directed 
communication as a dynamic process reflecting 
our most cherished values, beliefs and hopes. 
Emphasis will be on the concepts of justice, free- 
dom and responsibility, the wider imagination, 
and personal moral and ethical choices. Like all 
Capstone courses, it invites students to review 
their education at Boston College to reflect on the 
lifelong task of integrating work, personal rela- 
tionships, citizenship and spiritual development. 

Ann Marie Barry 

Other Majors' Courses 

CO 500 Debate Practicum (F, S: 1 ) 

Advanced discussion and analysis of contempo- 
rary debate theory with an emphasis on para- 
digms, topicality, counterplans, trends in debate, 
and other specialized topics. This is a one-credit 
course. Dale Herbeck 

John Katsulas 

CO 520 Media Workshop I (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisites: 1) Senior standing, 2) 3.0 and above 
GPA, 3) completion of six courses in communi- 
cation, including those required for the major, and 
4) permission of the instructor. 

This course gives senior communication ma- 
jors an opportunity to pursue a partial internship 
in the electronic or print media. Practical experi- 
ence will be supplemented by discussions of rel- 
evant theoretical constructs. Adherence to profes- 
sional protocol is expected. A field research pa- 
per is required. Gail McGrath 

CO 521 Media Workshop II (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Media Workshop I, 
and permission of the instructor. 

Additional internship experience in the media 
is available to communication majors for a second 
semester. Gail McGrath 



CO 590 Introduction to Honors in Communication 

(S:3) 

This course is designed to be an introduction to 
research in preparation for the completion of a 
scholarly thesis in Communication. Attention in 
the course will be devoted to data collection, re- 
search design, and topic selection. Emphasis also 
will be placed upon developing a writing style 
suitable for scholarly works. This course is open 
to juniors who have achieved a 3.4 cumulative 
grade point average. Students begin the honors 
program during the second semester of their jun- 
ior year, and those who complete this preparatory 
course with distinction may enroll in CO 591 
during the first semester of their senior year. 

Donald Fishman 

CO 591 Honors Program in Communication (F: 3) 

Candidates for Departmental Honors who have 
successfully completed CO 590 may enroll in this 
course. Students in the course complete an hon- 
ors thesis under the supervision of the instructor. 

Donald Fishman 

CO 597 Readings & Research — Communications 
(F, S: 3) 

This course is intended to provide an opportunity 
for students to explore topics not currently cov- 
ered in the curriculum. Students will work on a 
specific research project under the supervision of 
a faculty member. The defining characteristics of 
the course are that: (1) it must involve extensive 
readings, and (2) it must include a formal term 
paper of twenty or more pages. This course may 
be repeated for more than one semester. 

The Department 

CO 598 Teaching Assistantship (F, S: 3) 

This course is intended to provide undergradu- 
ate students with teaching experience. Students 
assist a professor in planning and implementing 
various aspects of a course. Open only to seniors 
and enrollment is limited to one student per pro- 
fessor. Permission of the instructor is required. 

The Department 

CO 599 Scholar of the College (F, S: 6) 

Students who have been accepted in the Scholar 
of the College Program should enroll in this 
course. May be repeated for more than one semes- 
ter. The Department 

Theater Course Offerings 

CT 060 Introduction to Theater (F, S: 3) 

A survey course for both majors and non-majors; 
its major aim is to impart an appreciation of the 
theater as an artistic and humanizing experience. 
There will be discussion of the various elements 
which contribute to the development of theater 
as a specialized art form: historical and cultural 
influences; staging styles and techniques and the 
multiple genres of dramatic writing. Several plays 
illustrating the above will be read and attendance 
at selected performances is required. This is a 
Core course. This course was previously listed as CT 
010. J. Paul Marcoux 

Denis Moran, S. J. 

CT 065 Performance Studies I: Literature in 
Performance (F: 3) 

An introductory course dealing with the prin- 
ciples and techniques of the oral performance of 
literature. Emphasis will be on methods of liter- 



ary analysis, logical and emotional content of lit- 
erature, and performance techniques. Various 
types of literature will be examined from the 
standpoint of aesthetics as well as communication. 
This is a Core course. This course, once titled Oral 
Interpretation of Literature, was previously listed as 
CT099. J. Paul Marcoux 

CT 101 Acting I: Introduction (F: 3) 

Students will work independently on concentra- 
tion, observation, sense recall, and related prin- 
ciples. On occasion, students will also work on 
special projects such as voice and body work, pre- 
paring a role and rehearsal techniques. The course 
does not pre-suppose acting experience but does 
take for granted a sincerity of purpose in learn- 
ing about the actor's approach to the theater. 
Permission of the instructor is required. This 
course, once titled Principles of Acting, was previously 
listed as CT 302. Denis Moran, S. J. 

CT 140 Elements of Theater Production (F: 3) 

Classroom discussions and demonstrations pro- 
vide an introductory understanding of the history, 
theory and practice of technical theater produc- 
tion, while hands-on experience equips students 
with the basic knowledge and minimum skills 
necessary for the preparation and execution of 
scenery, costumes, and lighting for the stage. This 
course also emphasizes the collaborative and co- 
operative nature of theater production by placing 
the individual production responsibility in the 
context of the production organization as a whole. 
Required of all theater majors, this course is also 
highly recommended for those students who in- 
tend to work on departmental and/or non-depart- 
mental productions. Students enrolled in CT 140 
must also enroll in CT 145, Theater Production 
Laboratory I. This course was previously listed as CT 
143. Jan Chambers 

CT 145 Theater Production Laboratory I (F, S: 1) 

To be taken in conjunction with CT 140 (Ele- 
ments of Theater Production). This course famil- 
iarizes the student with specific equipment and 
skills needed for the preparation of scenery, cos- 
tumes, lighting, and sound for theater production. 
It is a scheduled laboratory that meets once a week 
for three hours. This is a one-credit course. 

Jan Chambers 

CT 147 Theater Production Laboratory I (F, S: 1) 

This section of Theater Production Laboratory 
is a self-scheduled laboratory for non-majors only. 
Students will either choose one area of produc- 
tion (scenery, lighting, costume, or sound) and 
schedule themselves to work three hours per week 
for the duration of the semester, or they may elect 
to serve on a running crew for a mainstage pro- 
duction. Orientation classes for the various areas 
of production will be held during the first two 
weeks of the semester and are to be attended by 
everyone working in that production area. May 
be repeated for up to four credits. (Note: This 
course will not fulfill the Theater Production 
Laboratory requirement for the majors.) This is 
a one-credit course. Jan Chambers 

CT 1 53 Elements of Design for the Stage (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: CT 140 or permission of instructor. 
This is a studio course which provides an un- 
derstanding of how line, shape, color, texture, 
value, space, and movement relate (two, three, and 



36 • College of Arts & Sciences • Communication and Theater 



four-dimensionally) to the physical creation of 
character and environment for the stage. Because 
these physical images originate in the creative 
design process, coursework involves experimen- 
tation with various media and techniques as av- 
enues for the conceptualization and communica- 
tion of the design idea. Equal emphasis is given 
to the development of traditional communication 
skills for set, lighting, and costume design — such 
as drafting, perspective drawing, modelmaking, 
and rendering. This course is highly recom- 
mended for Fine Arts majors, Theater majors, and 
other students interested in theater design and 
production. This course was previously listed as CT 
144. Jan Chambers 

CT 1 80 (BK 240) Introduction to Black Theater 

(F:3) 

A survey of the history of Blacks in the American 
theater and the development of Black theater in 
the United States from the nineteenth century to 
the present. This course also surveys readings by 
Black playwrights from William Welles Browne 
to the present. This course explores answers to 
such questions as the following: What is the na- 
ture of the African dramatic tradition? What has 
been the role of Blacks in the American theater? 
What has been the relationship between theater 
by Blacks and the rest of the American theater? 
WTiat has been the impact of stereotyping of 
Blacks in theater, film and on television? What 
external conditions have been conducive to the 
growth and development of Black theater? Who 
are the major Black playwrights and what are their 
works? What has been the role of Black theater 
companies? What is the New Black Theater? 
What are some of the key issues in Black drama 
criticism? 

The course will consist of readings in Black 
theater history, Black-authored plays, and Black 
drama criticism; class discussion; and oral read- 
ings. Fahamisha Brown 

CT 201 Acting II: Characterization (S: 3) 

This course pre-supposes some exposure to the 
actor's art and craft. It is built upon the founda- 
tion of skills and knowledge established in CT 101 
(Acting I). The emphasis will be on scripted ma- 
terials and improvisations as means of developing 
consistent and believable characters. The student 
should be reasonably conversant with a wide spec- 
trum of dramatic literature. Although not re- 
stricted to majors, this course is recommended for 
students willing to devote considerable time and 
energy to their own development as performers. 
Permission of instructor is required. Thisclasswas 
previously listed as CT 303. Alice Marmarchev 

CT 205 Elements of Dance (S: 3) 

1 his course is designed to develop the student's 
knowledge and experience of dance as an art form. 
Dance technique (ballet and modern), composi- 
tion, philosophy, history, aesthetics, as well as 
design will be included. No previous dance expe- 
rience is necessary but students will be expected 
to participate in all aspects of this course. 

Robert I 'erEccke, S. J. 

CT 235 Performing Arts Management (S: 3) 

I his course is designed for students with a joint 
interest in management and the production of 
performing arts. It will focus on box office pro- 
cedures, accounting, promotion and advertising 



techniques, public relations, audience develop- 
ment and related concerns of the performing arts 
administrator. Howard Enoch 

CT 245 Theater Production Laboratory II 

(F,S:1) 

Prerequisites: CT 140 and CT 145, or permission 
of instructor. 

This course is a self-scheduled laboratory. 
Students will either choose one area of produc- 
tion (scenery, lighting, costume, or sound) and 
schedule themselves to work three hours per week 
for the duration of the semester, or they may elect 
to serve on a running crew for a mainstage show. 
May be repeated for a second credit in a different 
production area. This is a one-credit course. This 
course was previously listed as CT 146. 

Jan Chambers 

CT 253 Stage Design I (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: CT153, or permission of instructor. 
This course provides an understanding of the 
basic principles and methodology of theatrical 
design. Students are engaged in a series of exer- 
cises investigating the specific contributions of set, 
light, costume, and sound design to the art of the- 
ater, which culminates in the synthesis of those 
elements in a final design project. Emphasis is on 
visual interpretation of a play, research for design, 
and the graphic communication of the design 
ideas. This course is highly recommended for 
Fine Arts majors, Theater majors and other stu- 
dents interested in theater design and production. 

Jan Chambers 

CT 265 Performance Studies II: Theater of the 
Mind (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: CT 065, and permission of instruc- 
tor. 

An advanced offering in performance studies, 
this course will stress group performance of a 
variety of imaginative literature in several modes. 
Reader's theater will be examined as a major per- 
formance technique; chamber theater, story the- 
ater and newer forms of group interpretation will 
also be studied. The relationships existing be- 
tween literary analysis and group performance 
will receive considerable attention. A public re- 
cital will climax the course. J. Paul Marcoux 

CT 275 History of Theater I (F: 3) 

This course follows the simultaneous develop- 
ment of the actor, playwright, architect and di- 
rector from the Egyptian theater through to the 
Elizabethan and Jacobean theater. The course will 
also study the development of dramatic structure 
and form over time. In a larger sense, it will ex- 
amine the role and function of theater in each 
successive society, determining how the stage re- 
flects the social, political and cultural concerns of 
each age. Civen the range and detail of the mate- 
rial, lectures form the core of the class. In addi- 
tion to mastering lecture material, students are 
expected to read a series of primary source mate- 
rials, including plays. This course was previously 
listed as CT 015. Stuart J. Hecht 

CT 276 History of Theater II (S: 3) 

This course is a continuation of I listory of The- 
ater I. It too follows the simultaneous develop- 
ment of the actor, playwright, architect, and di- 
rector, but takes the story from the year 1642 to 
the present. The course will also study the devel- 



opment of dramatic structure and form over time. 
As in the first half of the course, this class will 
examine the role and function of theater in each 
successive society, determining how the stage re- 
flects the social, political, and cultural concerns 
of each age. You need not have taken History of 
Theater I in order to take this course. This course 
was previously listed as CT 076. Stuart J. Hecht 

CT 301 Acting III: Script Analysis (F: 3) 

This course has a prerequisite of CT 101 and CT 
201, as well as some stage experience. It takes the 
basic acting skills for granted and proceeds to 
examine specific problems in scene study and 
script analysis. Understanding the text and trans- 
lating that understanding through performance is 
the basis of the several scenes which are per- 
formed as "works in progress." Permission of the 
instructor is required. This course was previously 
listed as CT 304. J. Paul Marcoux 

CT 305 Dance: History and Performance (F: 3) 

This lecture-lab course offers the experienced 
dance student an opportunity to explore in-depth 
dance as an art form. Through readings, films and 
concerts, the student will be exposed to the vari- 
ous periods of dance: Renaissance, Romantic, 
Classical, Modern, and Contemporary. Students 
will be expected to choreograph and perform their 
own works as well as do those of professional cho- 
reographers. This course was previously listed as CT 
459. Robert VerEecke, S. J. 

CT 345 Theater Production Laboratory Ilia 

(F,S:1) 

Prerequisite: CT 245, or permission of instructor. 
This course is a self-scheduled laboratory. 
Students will choose one area of production (scen- 
ery, lighting, costume, or sound) and schedule 
themselves to work four hours per week for the 
duration of the semester, or they may elect to 
serve as a crew chief for a mainstage show. This 
is a one-credit course. Jan Chambers 

CT 348 Theater Production Laboratory 1Mb 

(F,S:1) 

Students enrolled in this course will serve as a 
design assistant to a faculty designer on a 
mainstage production. Enrollment is by permis- 
sion of instructor. May be repeated for a second 
credit in a different production area. This is a one- 
credit course. Jan Chambers 

CT 353 Stage Design II (S: 3) 

This course takes a holistic approach to design for 
theater in treating set, light, and costume design 
as synergistically equal design components. Stu- 
dents work in groups to identify and explore the 
particular design challenges set forth in a variety 
of plays. Focus is on collective immersion in the 
design process, emphasizing the collaborative 
nature of that process and enriching the individu- 
als' experiences of reading, interpretation, re- 
search, and conceptualization of production style. 
The semester's work culminates in verbal and 
visual presentations of the groups' final sceno- 
graphic solutions for chosen plays. This is an ad- 
vanced design course recommended only for 
those students who have completed CT 253. Stu- 
dents enrolled in CT 353 are strongly encouraged 
to enroll in CT 348, Theater Production Labo- 
ratory Illb. Permission of instructor is required. 

Jan Chambers 



College of Arts & Sciences • Communication and Theater • 37 



CT 360 Greek and Roman Theater and Drama 

(S:3) 

With Aristotle's Poetics and Horace's Ars Poetica 
as classic critical texts, this course will study se- 
lections from the tragedies of Aeschylus, 
Sophocles and Euripides and the comedies of 
Aristophanes as well as the tragedies of Seneca and 
the comedies of Plautus. These plays will be 
treated as the theater of Greece and Rome which 
gave the Western world a culture and an aesthetic. 
Previously listed as CT 363. Denis Moran, S. J. 

CT 361 Shakespeare On the Stage (F: 3) 

William Shakespeare wrote his plays to be per- 
formed. Consequently, the most effective method 
of understanding his work is through perfor- 
mance. Lectures will describe the condition of 
Elizabethan England and its theater, providing a 
larger social and historical context in which to 
view the playwright and his work. The class will 
read, analyze, and discuss some ten to twelve 
Shakespearean plays, including his comedies, 
tragedies, history plays, and the so-called "prob- 
lem plays." Students will also be expected to per- 
form scenes from Shakespeare's plays, not to dem- 
onstrate their acting skills, but rather as a means 
to explore how each play actually works. 

Stuart J. Hecht 

CT 365 Modern Theater and Drama (S: 3) 

In one sense, the purpose of this class is to review 
the development of modern drama, from its roots 
in Ibsen through to the present. In order to do this 
we will read some ten to twelve plays, including 
works by such playwrights as Ibsen, Chekhov, 
Shaw, Pirandello, Brecht, Pinter, Beckett, 
O'Neill, Shaffer, Shepard, August Wilson and 
Craig Lucas. 

In another sense, this is a class in learning how 
plays work. We will examine each play's dramatic 
structure and consider how exactly form (style) 
reflects content. In all cases, we will consider each 
work's thematic content and the implications of 
performance elements.. Stuart J. Hecht 

CT 430 Directing I (F: 3) 

A course in the fundamentals of script analysis, 
staging and interpretation. Students learn 
through both lecture and practical application the 
basic skills which constitute the stage director's 
craft. Each student will direct four in-class scenes, 
each designed to master a separate aspect of the 
directorial discipline. In addition to scene work, 
students are expected to write several brief papers 
outlining their conceptual and practical directo- 
rial approach to chosen works. Previous acting or 
other stage experience, along with background in 
dramatic literature, is strongly recommended. 
Permission of instructor is required. This course 
■was previously listed as CT 306. Stuart J. Hecht 

CT431 Directing II (S: 3) 

This course is built upon the foundations of skills 
and knowledge developed in Directing I. The stu- 
dents will further refine skills acquired in the first 
course, and will also gain an understanding of the 
theoretical aspects of the director's craft. Permis- 
sion of the instructor is required. This course was 
previously listed as CT 307. Stuart J. Hecht 



CT 445 Theater Production Laboratory IV 
(F, S: 2) 

This course offers two credits for extensive pro- 
duction or performance work (e.g., design of a 
workshop, assistant directing for mainstage, stage 
management, substantial performance work). 
Thorough coursework in the given area is re- 
quired. May be repeated for a second credit in a 
different production area. Permission of the in- 
structor is required. This is a two-credit course. 

Jan Chambers 

CT 461 Farce and Melodrama (S: 3) 

The two most enduring theatrical forms are farce 
and melodrama. This course explores the history 
and philosophy of both. Starting with early Greek 
comedy, the idea of farce as a separate dramatic 
genre is explored with an emphasis on the work 
of Georges Feydeau. In addition, the class will 
examine the aesthetics of the melodramatic vision 
especially as it was perceived by Guilbert de 
Pixerecourt in France and developed by the popu- 
lar melodramatists of the nineteenth century in 
England and America. Consideration will be 
given to contemporary farce and melodrama as 
essential forms of popular theater. Scenes from 
representative farces and melodramas will be per- 
formed in class to illustrate the continuing viabil- 
ity of popular theater. J. Paul Marcoux 

CT 501 Theater Practicum in Performance 
(F, S: 3) 

An advanced independent study for those students 
interested in developing a significant performance 
work under faculty supervision. This involves 
both research and performance. Only those stu- 
dents who have completed CT 101, CT 201, CT 
301 and who have had considerable performance 
experience are considered. Only open to seniors. 
Permission of the instructor is required. 

The Department 

CT 530 Theater Practicum in Directing (F, S: 3) 

This is a senior project in which a limited num- 
ber of students direct a Departmental Workshop 
production, contingent upon the acceptance of a 
written proposal submitted to the faculty. This 
course is an independent study for those students 
interested in advanced study in directing, done 
under close faculty supervision. The course in- 
volves preparatory research, directing the given 
production, and pre- and post-written analyses of 
the project. Only those students who have suc- 
cessfully completed both directing classes may be 
considered to direct a Workshop production. 
Permission of a sponsoring instructor is required. 

The Department 



CT 540 Theater Practicum in Design (F, S: 3) 

This is a Senior Project involving the design of 
sets, lights, and/or costumes for a departmental 
mainstage production. Candidates are selected in 
the second semester of their junior year and will 
at that time discuss the scope of the project with 
the faculty. Consultation with the faculty will 
determine whether the student enrolls for Prac- 
ticum in the fall or spring semester of the senior 
year. Consideration for enrollment will be given 
to those students who have successfully completed 
the design sequence, including six of the eight 
required Theater Production Laboratories. The 
student will initially submit a written proposal 
outlining the intent of the practicum project, and 
will document the design work throughout the 
process. Evaluations will be made in the form of 
a faculty discussion and critique of both process 
and product. Permission of a sponsoring instruc- 
tor is required. The Department 

CT 550 Honors Project in Theater (F, S: 3) 

A year-long project open only to senior theater 
majors. An advanced independent study in the 
area of readings and research, though it may in- 
clude a performance or production aspect. This 
will result in a written thesis at year's end. Per- 
mission of a sponsoring instructor is required. 

The Department 

CT 590 Teaching Assistantships (F, S: 3) 

This course is intended to provide undergradu- 
ate theater majors with teaching experience. Stu- 
dents assist a professor in planning and imple- 
menting various aspects of a course. Preference 
is given to seniors, though juniors may be con- 
sidered, and to those who have previously success- 
fully completed the given class. Permission of the 
instructor is required. The Department 

CT 598 Readings and Research in Theater 
(F, S: 3) 

Students are not encouraged to employ this 
course for anything but a very specific research 
program, which must be approved in advance by 
a theater faculty member. Prerequisite: senior 
standing and 12 credit hours in theater. Permis- 
sion of instructor is required. The Department 



38 • College of Arts & Sciences • Computer Science 



Computer Science 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Arts and Sciences students may either major or 
minor in Computer Science, or take a concentra- 
tion in either Computer Science or Information 
Systems. The major and minor programs are ad- 
ministered by the Department of Mathematics 
and are described below; the concentrations are 
administered by the Computer Science Depart- 
ment in the Carroll School of Management and 
are described under that section of this Catalog. 
The program descriptions which follow include 
references to the course categories (A), (B), (C), 
(D), (E), and (F), which are defined under the 
section "Course Offerings" below. 

Program Director for Computer Science: As- 
sociate Professor Ned I. Rosen, Department of 
Mathematics 

The Computer Science Major 

The Computer Science major is designed to be 
both intellectually demanding and practical. 
There are two components to the course require- 
ments for the major: courses in computers and 
courses in mathematics. The requirements for the 
ten-course computer science component have 
been changed for the Class of 1996 (and beyond); 
both sets of requirements are listed here. 

Computer Science component: Class of 1996 
(and later classes) 

1. Computer Science I (MT 550/MC 140) 

2. Computer Science II (MT 551/MC 141) 

3. Computer Organization and Assembly 
Language (MT 572/MC 260) 

4. Algorithms (MT 583/MC 383) 

5. Theory of Computation (MT 585/ MC 385) 

6. Computer Architecture (MC 372) 

7. One course chosen from Compilers (MC 
371) and Operating Systems (MC 362). 

8.-10. Three electives chosen from (D), (E), and 
(F) below, of which at least two must be 
advanced Computer Science electives (E). 

Computer Science component: Classes of 
1993, 1994, 1995 

1. Computer Science I (MT 550/MC 140) 

2. Computer Science II (MT 55 1/MC 141) 

3. Computer Organization and Assembly 
Language (MT 572/MC 260) 

4. Algorithms (MT 583/MC 383) 

5. Theory of Computation (MT 585/ MC 385) 
6.-10. Five electives chosen from (D), (E), and 
(F) below, of which at least three must be 
advanced Computer Science electives (E). 

The first five courses in the major are cross- 
listed between the Mathematics Department and 
the Computer Science Department, and a student 
may register for these courses under either des- 
ignation. Computer Science majors who are con- 
sidering technical careers in computers are urged 
to include Computer Architecture (MC 372), 
Compilers (MC 371), and Operating Systems 
(MC 362) among their electives. Most of the ad- 
vanced electives are offered only in alternate years, and 
students should plan their programs accordingly. 



An entering student who has achieved a score 
of 4 or higher on the Computer Science AP test 
should speak to the Program Director for Com- 
puter Science about placing out of the first course. 
In this case, a student would be required to sub- 
stitute an extra elective to complete the Computer 
Science major. 

For Computer Science majors in the College 
of Arts and Sciences, the computer science courses 
taken in the Carroll School of Management may 
be counted towards the 32 courses that must be 
taken in A&S. 

The mathematics component of the Com- 
puter Science major is as follows: 

1. Calculus: MT 100-101, MT 102-103, or MT 
110-111 (or an equivalent first-year calculus 
course) 

2. Discrete Mathematics: 

a. MT 243 or MT 2 16-2 17 

b. MT 244, or MT 445 and MT 420, or MT 
445 and MT 426 

Students considering the Computer Science 
major are advised to take MT 100, MT 102, or 
MT 110 as freshmen and normally should take 
Computer Science I either in the spring term of 
their freshman year or in the fall term of their 
sophomore year. Also, the entire mathematics 
component must be completed before taking Al- 
gorithms, so Computer Science majors should 
plan to complete the mathematics component by 
the end of the junior year. 

Students who wish to double major in Math- 
ematics and Computer Science should take MT 
1 02-1 03 in their first year. Double majors may not 
use the same courses to fulfill both the ten-course 
computer component for the Computer Science 
major and the course requirements for the Math- 
ematics major. However, mathematics courses 
taken to fulfill the Mathematics major require- 
ments may be used to satisfy the mathematics 
component of the Computer Science major. 

Computer Science majors who are consider- 
ing graduate school in Computer Science should 
plan to complete the required courses (and Com- 
puter Architecture) before taking the GRE 
achievement test in Computer Science, and, in 
addition, are urged to take at least two more math- 
ematics courses, including a course in probabil- 
ity/statistics, in their undergraduate programs. 

Questions about the Computer Science ma- 
jor should be directed to the Program Director 
for Computer Science in the Department of 
Mathematics, which administers the program. 

The Computer Science Minor 

The minor program in Computer Science is de- 
signed to provide a coherent and demanding 
course of study in Computer Science for students 
with a strong secondary interest in Computer 
Science. 

A&S students intending to minor in Com- 
puter Science should register with the Program 
Director no later than fall semester of their jun- 
ior year. In addition, they must see the Program 
Director in their senior year, when the six courses 
to be taken have been determined. 



Six courses are required for the minor: 

1 . Introductory: MT 008 or MT 063 or MC 

021 

2. Computer Science I: MT 550/MC 140 

3. Computer Science II: MT 551/MC 141 

4. Computer Organization and Assembly 
Language: MT 572/MC 260 

5. One advanced elective, chosen from 
categories (C) or (E) below. 

6. One elective, chosen from categories (C), (D), 
or (E) below. 

The first course in the minor may be waived 
for students entering with significant program- 
ming experience; the first two courses may be 
waived for students who have achieved a score of 
4 or higher on the Computer Science AP test. In 
both of these cases, however, a student must sub- 
stitute electives chosen from (C), (D), and (E) for 
the waived courses. 

Questions concerning the program, including 
placing out of courses, should be addressed to the 
Program Director for Computer Science, De- 
partment of Mathematics. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Courses in Computer Science are offered in the 
Mathematics Department and in the Computer 
Science Department, and certain courses are 
cross-listed between the two departments. The 
following list summarizes the Computer Science 
curriculum for undergraduates; for course de- 
scriptions, see the Mathematics section for MT 
courses, or Computer Science (in the Carroll 
School of Management section) for MC courses. 
Students should be aware that most of the advanced 
electives are offered in alternate years. 

A. Introductory courses: 

• MC 02 1, Computers for Management 

• MT 008, Introduction to Computers and 
Programming 

• MT 063, Mathematical Analysis and the 
Computer 

• MT 174, Topics in Computer Applications 

B. Programming core: 

• MT 550/MC 140, Computer Science I 

• MT 550/MC 141, Computer Science II 

• MT 572/MC 260, Computer Organization 
and Assembly Language 

C. Required Courses for the Major: 

• MT 583/MC 383, Algorithms 

• MT 585/MC 385, Theory of Computation 

• MC 372, Computer Architecture 

D. Intermediate Electives: 

• MC 252, Systems Analysis 

• MC 254, Business Systems 

• MC 340, Management Information Systems 

• MC 690, Ethical Issues in Computer Use 



College of Arts & Sciences • Economics 



39 



Economic 



E. Advanced Electives: (those offered 
in 1 992-93 are so indicated) 

• MT 566, Programming Languages 

• MT 568/MC 633, Computer Graphics 

• MT 577/MC 652, Microcomputer Systems 

• MC 357, Database Systems (1992-93) 

• MC 359, Artificial Intelligence (1992-93) 

• MC 362, Operating Systems 

• MC 371, Compilers (1992-93) 

• MC 373, Robotics (1992-93) 

• MC 374, Topics in Computer Science 
(1992-93) 

• MC 611, Digital Systems Laboratory 
(1992-93) 

• MC 622, Prolog 

• MC 644, Scientific Computation 

• MT 599/MC 399, Reading and Research in 
Computer Science 

F. Cognates for the Computer Science 
major: 

• MT 414, Numerical Analysis 



FACULTY 

Robert J. McEwen, S.J., Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., Boston College; M.A., Fordham Univer- 
sity; Ph.L., S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., 
Boston College 

James E. Anderson, Professor; A.B., Oberlin 
College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Richard J. Arnott, Professor; B.S., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology; M.A., 
M.Philosophy, Ph.D., Yale 

David A. Belsley, Professor; A.B., Haverford 
College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Frank M. Gollop, Professor; A.B., University of 
Santa Clara; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Peter Gottschalk, Professor; B.A., M.A., 
George Washington University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania 

Marvin C. Kraus, Professor; B.S., Purdue Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

William B. Neenan, S.J., Professor; A.B., A.M., 
S.T.L., St. Louis University; Ph.D., University 
of Michigan; Academic Vice President and 
Dean of Faculties 

Joe Peek, Pivfessor; B.S., M.S., Oklahoma State 
University; Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Joseph F. Quinn, Professor, Chairperson of the 
Department; A.B., Amherst College; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Donald K. Richter, Professor; B.A., M.A., Yale 
University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Donald J. White, Professor; B.S., Boston Col- 
lege; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University; Dean, 
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 

Christopher F. Baum, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Kalamazoo College; A.M., Florida Atlantic 
University; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Donald Cox, Associate Professor; B.S., Boston 
College; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 

Andre Lucien Daniere, Associate Professor; 
Baccalaureate, Lyons; M.S., University of Mas- 
sachusetts; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Francis M. McLaughlin, Associate Professor, 
Assistant Chairperson of the Department; B.S., 
A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

Robert G. Murphy, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Williams College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology 

Harold A. Petersen, Associate Professor; A.B., 
DePauw University; Ph.D., Brown University 

Richard W. Tresch, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Williams College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology 



Leonardo Felli, Assistant Professor; Laurea, 
Universita De Gli Studi Di Trieste; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Jane Marrinan, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
DePaul University; Ph.D., University of Min- 
nesota 

E. Scott Mayfield, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Williams College; Ph.D., University of Penn- 
sylvania 

Stephen Polasky, Assistant Professor; B.A., Wil- 
liams College; M.A., London School of Eco- 
nomics; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Toni M. Whited, Assistant Professor; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Oregon; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton Uni- 
versity 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The major in Economics provides a critical ex- 
amination of how the economic system works in 
the United States and throughout the world. The 
introductory courses, EC 1 3 1 - 1 3 2 , are surveys of 
economic problems, policies, and theory, and re- 
quired courses in micro theory and macro theory 
give a deeper analytical foundation. Electives per- 
mit further study in a wide range of fields, includ- 
ing money and banking, fiscal policy, interna- 
tional trade and finance, law and economics, pub- 
lic sector economics, economic development, 
economic history, capital theory and finance, 
comparative economic systems, labor economics, 
econometrics, industrial organization, consumer 
economics, history of economic thought, trans- 
portation economics, environmental economics, 
urban economics, political economy and public 
policy analysis. A total often three-credit courses 
is required for the major, including Principles of 
Economics (EC 131-132), Economic Statistics 
(EC 151, 154, 155 or 157), Microeconomic 
Theory (EC 201 or 401), Macroeconomic Theory 
(EC 202 or 402), and any five electives. 

Students from the Carroll School of Manage- 
ment may choose Economics as an area of con- 
centration. The concentration consists of seven 
courses, including Principles of Economics (EC 
131, 132), Microeconomic Theory (EC 201 or 
401), Macroeconomic Theory (EC 202 or 402), 
Economic Statistics (EC 151, 154 or 157), and any 
two electives. Students with a serious interest in 
economics, however, are urged to take at least ten 
courses, the equivalent of an Arts and Sciences 
major. Finally, all Carroll School of Management 
students, regardless of their area of concentration, 
are required to take Principles of Economics (EC 
13 1-1 32) and Statistics (EC 151,154, 155or 157). 

A student choosing to do honors work in eco- 
nomics, whether in the college honors program 
or not, does independent research and writes an 
honors thesis under the guidance of an individual 
professor. The thesis proposal must be approved 
by the Department Honors Committee and 
should be started by the beginning of classes in 



40 • College of Arts & Sciences • Economics 



the fall term of senior year. Honors students 
should also select the following courses: Honors 
Statistics (EC 155 or 157), Honors Microeco- 
nomic Theory (EC 401), Honors Macroeco- 
nomic Theory (EC 402), and several additional 
courses at the 400 level, i.e., the Departmental 
Seminars. One of these courses may be Econo- 
metrics (EC 428). There is also a comprehensive 
examination at the end of the senior year. 

Honors is conferred by a vote of the Honors 
Committee at the end of the student's senior year. 
Students planning to do graduate work should 
enter the honors program. Students with truly 
outstanding records are also encouraged to elect 
one or more graduate courses in their junior or 
senior years. 

Non-honors students with strong analytical 
ability are urged to fulfill their micro and macro 
theory requirements by taking EC 401 and EC 
402 rather than EC 201 and EC 202, and by re- 
placing some of the regular electives with Depart- 
mental Seminars. Students with good mathemati- 
cal backgrounds should take EC 157 rather than 
EC 151 to meet the statistics requirement and 
they should also take EC 428, Econometrics. Stu- 
dents planning to do graduate work in econom- 
ics should consider EC 711, Mathematics for 
Economists, or its equivalent in courses from the 
Mathematics Department. 

The major in Economics provides a general 
background that is useful to those planning ca- 
reers in law, government service, or business as 
well as those planning careers as professional 
economists. Professional economists work as col- 
lege teachers, as researchers for government agen- 
cies, businesses and consulting firms, and as ad- 
ministrators and managers in a wide range of 
fields. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Normally, students should take both EC 131 and 
EC 132 before taking any other Economics 
courses. Exceptions are EC 151 and EC 341-343 
for which there are no prerequisites. Students 
should take EC 131 before EC 132. EC 131-132 
also satisfy the Social Sciences Core requirement. 
Students considering Principles should know 
the fundamentals of high school algebra, espe- 
cially the algebra and geometry of a straight line. 
Calculus is recommended for economics majors. 

EC 131 Principles of Economics l-Micro (F, S: 3) 

Analysis of prices, output, and income distribu- 
tion through the interaction of households and 
business firms in a modern Western economy. 
I he appropriate role of government intervention 
is examined, and basic analytical tools are applied 
to current economic problems. The Department 

EC 1 32 Principles of Economics ll-Macro (F, S: 3) 

Analysis of national income and employment, 
economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, 
inflation, growth, and international aspects of 
macroeconomic policy. The Department 

EC 151 Economic Statistics (F, S: 3) 

EC 1 54 Economic Statistics-Management (F, S: 3) 
Probability, random variables, sampling distribu- 
tions, estimation of parameters, tests of hypoth- 
eses, regression and forecasting. The Department 



EC 1 55 Economic Statistics: Honors Level 
(Management) (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Calculus 
Topics covered will be for future use in the func- 
tional areas of business: finance, operations, mar- 
keting, and accounting. Richard McGowan, S.J. 

EC 201 Microeconomic Theory (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 1 3 1 

This course develops a theoretical framework 
with which to analyze consumer and producer 
behavior. This analysis is then employed to inves- 
tigate the determination of prices and output in 
various market situations, the implications for 
welfare and the appropriate role for government 
intervention. The Department 

EC 202 Macroeconomic Theory (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 1 3 2 

This course is intended to equip the student 
for the analysis of the determination of employ- 
ment and national income. Emphasis will be 
placed on the Keynesian theory of employment, 
interest, and money and on post-Keynesian 
macroeconomic models. The Department 

EC 299 Independent Study (F, S: 3) 

The student works under the direction of an in- 
dividual professor. The Department 

EC 332 American Economic History (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 131-132 

Study of the causes and social institutional 
changes of American economic growth from co- 
lonial times to the 20th century. Economic mod- 
els will suggest primary causes; alternative view- 
points will also be considered. James Anderson 

Mary Oates 

EC 333 History of Economic Thought (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 131-132 

A chronological survey of the main trends of 
Western economic thought (especially theory) 
from ancient times to the early and mid-forties 
(1940s). 

After a rapid overview of the foundations be- 
gun among the Greeks, Romans, Scholastic Doc- 
tors, and Mercantilists culminating in the 17th 
and 18th centuries, the main thrust of the course 
is a presentation of the leading economists from 
the Physiocrats to the present. 

The development of economic theories and 
policies will be constantly related to the socioeco- 
nomic and intellectual (philosophical) back- 
ground of their times. Frank McLaughlin 

EC 334 Economics and Catholic Social Teaching 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: EC 131-132 or permission of instruc- 
tor 

When Pope John Paul II released his encyc- 
lical "Centesimus Annus," some commentators 
quickly dubbed him "the capitalist pope." Is this 
appropriate? This course will explore one hun- 
dred years of Catholic teaching as it applies to 
issues of economic justice We will reflect on the 
links between economics and other disciplines and 
how these links can guide us in public policy. 

Note: The course is particularly suited to stu- 
dents of the Faith, Peace and Justice program, in 
addition to serving as a regular elective for Eco- 
nomics majors. Catherine Schneider 



EC 338 Lav/ and Economics (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401 

In this course, we utilize microeconomic 
analysis to evaluate the "performance" of legal 
institutions, with particular attention to the issue 
of economic efficiency. We will focus on ques- 
tions in the common law fields of property, torts, 
and contracts (and in the theory and practice of 
criminal law if time permits). Mary Oates 

EC 340 Labor Economics (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 131-132 

This course will introduce students to the 
methodology of labor economics from both in- 
stitutional and neo-classical perspectives. The 
principal emphasis will be on neo-classical theory 
and empirical work dealing with the supply and 
demand for labor; the operation of the labor mar- 
ket; the determination of wages; and the impact 
of trade unions and collective bargaining. Special 
emphasis will be placed on applications of theory 
and empirical findings to policy questions. 

Frank McLaughlin 

EC 341 The Consumer Revolution in the World 
Economy (F: 3) 

The Consumer Revolution: the objective, meth- 
ods and effects of the consumer revolution. Se- 
lected areas and industries, e.g., automobiles, 
credit, health care, food, representing special 
problems. There are no prerequisites for this 
course. Robert J. McEwen, S.J. 

EC 343 Consumer Information and Education 

(S:3) 

The economic problem of inadequate consumer 
information and the sources and methods of im- 
proving consumer information. There are no pre- 
requisites for this course. Robert J. McEwen, S.J. 

EC 346 Economics of Arbitration and Dispute 
Settlement (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 131-132 

This course will focus on an exposition and 
analysis of the methods that have been developed 
in the United States for resolving collective bar- 
gaining differences and disputes. The range of 
methods for resolving differences, including ne- 
gotiations, fact-finding, conciliation, mediation, 
and arbitration will be covered in detail and evalu- 
ated from the perspective of the efficient function- 
ing of the economy. Francis M. McLaughlin 

EC 349 Economics of Human Resources (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401 

This course addresses a variety of topics about 
labor markets, careers, labor-market policy, and 
family behavior. A sampling of issues explored: 
earnings prospects of baby-boomers, the "super- 
star" phenomenon in the labor market, how 
school affects workers, immigration policy, pro- 
tectionism, discrimination, women in the labor 
market, life-cycle patterns in careers and earnings, 
motives for private transfers among family mem- 
bers, the economic value of human life, and health 
and safety policy. Donald Cox 

EC 350 Economics of Medical Care (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 131 or 132 

Health care offers an interesting topic for eco- 
nomic study: it is important in its effects on con- 
sumers, expensive to buy, difficult to evaluate us- 
ing standard productivity concepts and subject to 
an often heated political debate concerning such 



College of Arts & Sciences • Economics • 41 



questions as fairness in access, legal liability and 
the incidence of costs. 

This course applies microeconomic analysis to 
the health care delivery and consumption in the 
U.S. It has the following objectives: 1) to increase 
your understanding of microeconomic theory, in 
particular as it applies to real world problems; 2) 
to provide you with a good knowledge of the eco- 
nomic aspects and institutions of health care in the 
U.S.; and 3) to offer you practice in the tailoring 
of general models to fit particular markets and in 
the synthesis of empirical information and re- 
search reports. Jaana Munrinen 

EC 353 Industrial Organization-Competition 
and Antitrust (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401 or permission of 
the instructor 

An economic analysis of market outcomes 
when firms are imperfectly competitive. We will 
analyze such issues as oligopoly behavior, collu- 
sion, mergers and takeovers, advertising, product 
differentiation, price discrimination, entry and 
entry deterrence, innovation and patents, and 
antitrust law. Frank Gollop 

EC 354 Industrial Organization-Public 
Regulation (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401 or permission of 
the instructor 

An analysis of sources of market failure which 
lead to direct governmental regulation. The pit- 
falls of rate-of-return regulation are identified, as 
are the mechanisms that can be used to introduce 
marginal cost pricing into a regulated industry. 
Principles of deregulation are examined through 
study of a number of industries including tele- 
communications, airlines, trucking, railroads and 
electric utilities. The course evaluates particular 
problems relating to the regulation of occupa- 
tional health and safety and the use of environ- 
mental resources. Frank Gollop 

EC 359 (PO 339) Economics and Politics of the 
Environment (S: 3) 

This course examines environmental issues from 
the perspectives of both economics and political 
science. A wide variety of specific environmental 
issues will be addressed including hazardous 
waste, air and water pollution control, global cli- 
mate change, wilderness preservation and land 
use. For each issue we will analyze both the po- 
litical and the economic factors that affect envi- 
ronmental policy formation and implementation. 

Mark Landy 
Stephen Polasky 

EC 361 Monetary Theory and Policy (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 202 or EC 402, or permission of 
instructor 

An analysis of the operation and behavior of 
financial markets and financial institutions. Em- 
phasis is placed on financial intermediaries, in- 
cluding commercial banks, and the central bank. 
The money supply process and alternative theo- 
ries of the demand for money are considered, as 
well as their implications for monetary policies 
and macroeconomic performance. 

Mark Kazarosian 
Hossein Kazemi 



EC 362 Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201-202 or EC 401-402. 

This course focuses on the workings of 
financial markets and their effects on the U.S. 
economy. Emphasis is placed on the Treasury and 
municipal securities markets, mortgage-backed 
securities, and derivative assets such as futures and 
options. Macroeconomic topics considered in- 
clude the "twin deficits", the savings and loan cri- 
sis, and the effects of the Crash of '87. 

Christopher F. Baum 

EC 364 Monetary Policy and the Business Cycle 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: Macro Policy and Money and Bank- 
ing 

The course is designed to give the student an 
understanding of the complexity of monetary 
policy decision-making. Four types of complexi- 
ties will be addressed: 1) the balance to be struck 
between the competing objectives of employment 
and price stability; 2) the uncertain relationships 
between the tools of policy, interest rates and the 
money supply, and the nominal GNP; 3) the un- 
certainties with respect to the strength of the 
economy; and 4) operational uncertainties in con- 
trolling monetary aggregates. Frank Moms 

EC 365 Public Finance (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401 or permission of 
instructor 

An analysis of the microeconomic problems 
of the public sector in a market economy includ- 
ing: the proper scope of the public sector; deci- 
sion rules for government expenditures; practical 
problems of cost-benefit analysis; criteria for a 
good tax system and the economic effects of taxes. 
The course stresses current U.S. problems. 

Richard Arnott 

EC 368 Economics of Gender and Race (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 131-132 

This course applies economic analysis to the 
study of gender- or race-based differences in eco- 
nomic roles and rewards. 

It presents several alternative explanations for 
these differences and compares their predictions 
with empirical evidence. Both explanations based 
on discrimination and nondiscriminatory models 
are considered. Public policies, such as affirma- 
tive action, are also discussed and assessed. A 
sample of the topics of the course: sexual division 
of labor, quotas as affirmative action, segregation 
in housing markets. Jaana Muurinen 

EC 371 International Trade (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401 or permission of 
the instructor 

An analysis of the foundations of trade and the 
principle of comparative advantage, leading to a 
sophisticated study of protectionism. Current 
U.S. protectionist issues will be illuminated, as 
well as, economic warfare, control of international 
factor movements, and interaction of trade and 
economic development. James Anderson 

EC 372 International Finance (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 202 or EC 402 or permission of 
instructor 

Macroeconomic aspects of international trade 
and the balance of payments will be studied by 
using analytical models of the open economy. 



Particular emphasis will be placed on current 
policy issues related to the world debt crisis, the 
international monetary system, and exchange 
rates. Hossein Kazemi 

EC 375 Economic Development (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401 or permission of 
instructor 

This course deals with countries at an early 
stage of their economic development (also known 
as Third-World countries), including a survey of 
their social characteristics, the identification of 
factors responsible for their underdevelopment, 
and a critical review of public policies capable of 
fostering economic growth and achieving other 
social objectives. Atneya Chakroborty 

EC 380 Capital Theory and Finance (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 20 1 or EC 40 1 and EC 1 5 1 or EC 
157, or permission of instructor 

Valuation of assets, rates of return, measure- 
ment of earnings, finance and securities markets, 
risk and portfolio choice, and special problems in 
investment. Harold Petersen 

EC 394 Urban Economics (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401, or permission of 
instructor. 

This course deals with the economy of cities. 
The subjects treated are location and land use, 
urban transportation, housing, and local taxation 
and provision of public services. While the em- 
phasis of the lectures will be on theory, there will 
be some discussion of public policy. Also, all stu- 
dents must write a field essay which entails apply- 
ing urban economic theory to some aspect of the 
Boston urban scene. Richard Arnott 

EC 395 Real Estate Finance (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 and EC 202 

This course applies the standard tools of 
financial analysis and economics to issues in real 
estate finance. Topics to be covered include an 
analysis of mortgage creating institutions, fixed- 
rate mortgages, alternative mortgage instruments 
(ARMs, PLAMs, GPMs, etc.), secondary mort- 
gage markets, and the securitization of mortgages. 

Joe Peek 

EC 401 Microeconomic Theory Honors Level 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: EC 131 and Calculus 

A more intensive analytical treatment of the 
same material presented in EC 201. Some math- 
ematical tools will be developed as needed. Open 
to anyone who has done well in Principles of 
Economics and highly recommended for students 
interested in doing graduate work in economics. 

Donald Cox 

EC 402 Macroeconomic Theory Honors Level 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: EC 132 

A more intensive treatment of the same ma- 
terial presented in EC 202. Open to anyone who 
has done well in Principles of Economics and 
highly recommended for students interested in 
doing graduate work in economics. 

Robert Murphy 

EC 403-496 Departmental Seminar Series 
(F, S: 3) 

Each semester the Department will offer up to 
five small seminar style courses in economic 
theory or policy, limited to 1 5 students each. The 



42 • College of Arts & Sciences 'English 



seminars are intended to create possibilities for 
student-student and student-faculty interaction 
that do not exist in the larger EC 300 electives. 
Honors candidates must choose at least three 
seminars among their ten courses, but the semi- 
nars are open to non-Honors students as well. Any 
major with a solid record in Principles and the 
Theory courses is encouraged to participate. 

EC 428 Econometrics (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Calculus, and EC 151 or EC 157 or 
its equivalent 

This course focuses on testing the predictions 
of economic theory. Topics covered include 
simple and multiple regression, multicollinearity, 
heteroskedasticity, serial correlation, specification 
errors, errors in variables, and an introduction to 
simultaneous equation estimation. 

The Department 

EC 446 Seminar: Advanced Topics in Micro 
Economics (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 and EC 202, calculus and 
statistics. 

This course will survey an assortment of top- 
ics that have stimulated a lot of interest in the 
economics profession in recent years. Course 
material will be drawn from the economics of 
information, game theory, and theories of eco- 
nomic growth. Students will be required to re- 
search a narrow economic question. Donald Cox 

EC 454 Seminar: Economics of Regulation (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401 

A more intensive form of EC 3 54. This course 
covers critical concepts presented in EC 354 and 
then expands to cover additional regulatory policy 
issues. The professor works with each student to 
develop a research paper using intermediate mi- 
cro theory to evaluate a regulatory policy of in- 
terest to the student. Frank Gollop 



EC 456 Seminar: Topics in Natural Resources 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 401 

The seminar will consider theoretical and 
policy issues in environmental and resource eco- 
nomics. Topics include an analysis of design and 
implementation of efficient policies of pollution 
control, and an analysis of the optimal use of ex- 
haustible natural resource stocks, such as oil and 
natural gas. Students will prepare and present a 
research project applying economic theory to an 
environmental or resource issue of their choos- 
ing. Stephen Polasky 

EC 484 Seminar: Applied Micro Theory (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 and calculus, or EC 401. 

This course will treat two topics — the eco- 
nomics of uncertainty and insurance, and the 
theory of the second best (the theory of public 
policy in the presence of distortions). The theory 
will be developed and then applied to current is- 
sues in public policy such as the design of tax sys- 
tems, and of unemployment insurance, automo- 
bile accident insurance, and health insurance pro- 
grams, as well as public utility and urban trans- 
portation policy. Richard Arnott 

EC 497 Senior Honors Research (F: 3) 

EC 498 Senior Honors Thesis (S: 3) 

Required of all seniors seeking a degree with 
Honors in Economics. Robert Murphy 

EC 600-601 Scholar of the College (F: 3-5: 3) 



Other courses offered regularly, although not in 

1992-93, include: 

EC 337 Women in the American Economy 

EC 339 Welfare Economics 

EC 344 Poverty and Discrimination 

EC 356 Environmental and Natural Resource 

Economics 

EC 357 Political Economy I 

EC 358 Political Economy II 

EC 391 Transportation Economics 

EC 398 Comparative Economic Systems 

EC 399 Economies in Transition 

EC 403 Seminar: Topics in Micro Theory 

EC 404 Seminar: Economic Stabilization 

EC 43 3 Seminar: History of Economic 

Thought 

EC 455 Seminar: Antitrust Policy 

EC 461 Seminar: Topics in Monetary Policy 

EC 462 Seminar: Topics in Macro Policy 

EC 463 Seminar: Micro Public Policy 

EC 464 Seminar: Topics in Macro Theory 

EC 466 Seminar: Topics in Taxation 

EC 468 Seminar: Topics in Economic 
Development 

EC 47 1 Seminar: Topics in International Trade 

EC 472 Seminar: Topics in International 
Finance 

EC 480 Seminar: Topics in Financial Markets 
EC 482 Seminar: Topics in Capital Markets 
EC 486 Seminar: Topics in Poverty and 
Discrimination 

EC 493 Seminar: Topics in State and Local 
Public Finance 



E 



N 



G 



H 



FACULTY 

P. Albert Duhamel, Professor Emeritus; B.A., 
College of the I loly Cross; A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

John J. Fitzgerald, Associate Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., Boston College; A.M., Ph.D., Fordham 
University 

Daniel McCue, Jr., Associate Professor Emeritus; 
LB., Boston College; A.M., Ph.D., Columbia 
University 

John 1 1. Randall, III, Associate Professor Emeri- 
tus; A.B., Columbia University; A.M. Univer- 
sity of( California at Berkeley; Ph.D., University 
of Minnesota 

Joseph McCafferty, Assistant Professor Emeri- 
tus. A. I).. A.M., Boston College 

Joseph A. Appleyard, S.J., Professor; A.B., Bos- 
ton (College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

J. Robert Barth, S.J., Professor; Ph.D., Harvard 
University 



Rosemarie Bodenheimer, Professor; A.B., 
Radcliffe College; Ed.M., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., Boston College 

Leonard R. Casper, Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Adele M. Dalsimer, Professor; A.B., Mt. Holyoke 
College; M.S., Hunter College; Ph.D., Yale Uni- 
versity 

Richard E. Hughes, Professor; A.B., Siena Col- 
lege; A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin 

Paul Lewis, Professor; A.B., City College of 
New York; A.M., University of Manitoba; 
Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

Robin R. Lydenberg, Professor; A.B., Barnard 
College; A.M., Ph.D., Cornell University 

John L. Mahoney, Professor; A.B., A.M., Bos- 
ton College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

John J. McAJeer, Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 
(College; Ph.D., Harvard University 



Kristin Morrison, Professor; A.B., Immaculate 
Heart College; A.M., St. Louis University; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Richard J. Schrader, Professor; A.B., Notre 
Dame University; A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State 
University 

E. Dennis Taylor, Professor; A.B., College of 
the Holy Cross; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University 

Christopher P. Wilson, Professor; A.B., 
Princeton University; Ph.D., Yale University 

Judith Wilt, Professor, Chairperson of the Depart- 
ment; A.B., Duquesne University; Ph.D., Indi- 
ana University 

Henry A. Black well, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Morgan State College; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago 

Robert L. Chibka, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Yale University; M.F.A., University of Iowa; 
M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 



College of Arts & Sciences • English • 43 



Mary Thomas Crane, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Harvard College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity 

Paul C. Doherty, Associate Professor; A.B., Col- 
lege of the Holy Cross; A.M., Boston Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Missouri 

Carol Hurd Green, Adjunct Associate Professor; 
B.A., Regis College; M.A., Georgetown Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., George Washington University 

Dayton Haskin, Associate Professor; A.B., Uni- 
versity of Detroit; A.M., Northwestern Univer- 
sity; B.D., University of London; Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Robert Kern, Associate Professor; A.B., City 
College of New York; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Joseph A. Longo, Associate Professor; B.S., 
M.Ed., A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

John F. McCarthy, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Harvard University; A.M., Ph.D., Yale Univer- 
sity 

Robert E. Reiter, Associate Professor; A.B., St. 
Bonaventure University; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan 

Frances L. Restuccia, Associate Professor; B.A., 
M.A., Occidental College; Ph.D., University of 
California at Berkeley 

Alan Richardson, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Princeton University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Cecil F. Tate, Associate Professor; A.B., Univer- 
sity of Maryland; A.M., Ph.D., Emory Univer- 
sity 

Andrew J. Von Hendy, Associate Professor; 
A.B., Niagara University; A.M., Ph.D., Cornell 
University 

James D. Wallace, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Earlham College; M.A., Bread Loaf School of 
English; Ph.D., Columbia University 

William Youngren, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Amherst College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity 

Raymond G. Biggar, Assistant Professor; A.B., 
Bowdoin College; M.A.T., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Anne Fleche, Assistant Professor; B.A., State 
University at Buffalo; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers 
State University 

Suzanne M. Matson, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Portland State University; M.A., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Washington 

Philip T. O'Leary, Assistant Professor; A.B., 
Holy Cross; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jennifer A. Sharpe, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

Francis W. Sweeney, S.J., Assistant Professor; 
A.B., College of the Holy Cross; Ph.L., Weston 
College; A.M., Boston College 

Laura Tanner, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Colgate University; Ph.D., University of Penn- 
sylvania 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

In an academic milieu fragmented into depart- 
ments and specialized disciplines, the study of lit- 
erature is one of the few remaining elements of 
the old liberal education which still offers students 
a point of view from which they can integrate the 
diversity of their own experience. Language is the 
mirror of the human mind and literature the 
record of its preoccupations intellectual, aesthetic, 
psychological, political and social, historical, 
moral and religious. The study of literature is thus 
a schooling in human experience, and its primary 
use is for the development of those who study it. 
It is also, of course, good training for any field in 
which understanding of behavior is valued. And 
the tools used, because they deal with language 
and the forms of expression, have applicability in 
any kind of work where precise and effective com- 
munication is important. English majors can de- 
velop these skills to a considerable degree while 
undergraduates, and non-majors will find that 
taking even a few well-chosen courses beyond the 
Core requirement can widen their knowledge of 
literature and sharpen their linguistic abilities. 

Since the English major at Boston College 
prepares students not only for careers in high 
school and college and university teaching, but 
also in a variety of other professions (law, busi- 
ness, journalism, communications, etc.) our re- 
quirements have a special focus and emphasis. 

The Department major envisions students 
who can work critically and sensitively with texts 
in poetry and prose, who develop greater sophis- 
tication in making and articulating judgments 
about literature, who become familiar with some 
of the major developments in the history of Brit- 
ish and American literature, and who, in both lec- 
ture courses and seminars, pursue in greater depth 
special areas or major writers within that litera- 
ture as well as further refinement of both exposi- 
tory and creative writing skills. 

The goal of the major, if it can be described 
briefly, is to provide undergraduate students in a 
liberal arts college with a strengthened ability to 
read with care, to write with clarity and grace, to 
judge with an awareness of various critical meth- 
odologies. The major also seeks to provide as full 
a sense as possible of the range and variety of the 
literary tradition especially British and American 
and of key figures within that tradition. 

Core 

The Core requirement in English, six credit 
hours, is fulfilled by taking two semesters of Criti- 
cal Reading and Writing: EN 02 1-022, one semes- 
ter of Core English Seminar: EN 02 3-030, 03 3-036 
or two semesters of UN 104-107, Modernism and 
the Arts. 

Requirements for a Major 

1. Students normally begin an English major in 
their sophomore year, after having had two se- 
mesters of the Core course or its equivalent. In 
addition to the two Core courses, students must 
take ten courses from the Department's offerings. 
These must include the following required 
courses: EN 131: Studies in Poetry and then EN 
132: Practice of Criticism. These courses are nor- 
mally taken in sequence in the sophomore year. 
Both courses train students intensively in the close 
reading of literary texts and in writing with criti- 
cal awareness about literature. 



2. Also required are three other courses which 
must include: 

• 1 course in pre- 1700 English or American lit- 
erature 

• 2 courses in pre- 1900 English or American lit- 
erature 

• Courses satisfying the pre- 1700 requirement 
are: EN 110, 151, 161, 162, 170, 171, 228, 258, 
297, 300, 326, 329, 331, 340, 526, 529 and 699. 

• Courses satisfying the pre- 1 900 requirement are 
the above courses plus: EN 141, 142, 152, 163, 
164, 260, 276, 278, 301, 31 1, 3 18, 364, 398, 410, 
462, 500, 533, 540, and 596. 

These courses may be taken at any time in the 
student's major, but preferably after the comple- 
tion of Studies in Poetry. Students who have a 
special interest in American literature are advised 
to take Major American Writers I as a foundation 
for later courses. 

Other courses may be useful, particularly in 
the sophomore year, to fill in students' knowledge 
of the background out of which English and 
American literature developed: Chaucer to 
Spenser, Donne to Dryden, Pope to Keats, 
Tennyson to Eliot and the Major American Writ- 
ers sequence. At this point, students should be in 
a position to begin making their own choices 
about how they will complete the major require- 
ments. They will have a great many options from 
among the thirty or so electives the Department 
offers each semester in English and American lit- 
erature, in Irish studies, in writing, in the differ- 
ent genres, and in particular themes. By senior 
year students will have the opportunity to focus 
on some well-defined topics (individual authors, 
important single works, specialized themes). Each 
year the Department will offer seminars, to en- 
able students, usually seniors and juniors, to work 
closely with a faculty member on a topic of spe- 
cial interest. 

Individually Designed Major 

For some students with specific interdisciplinary 
interests, in American Studies for instance, an 
individually designed sequence of courses under 
the English major is appropriate. Students who 
satisfy their major requirements this way may 
count for English credit up to two courses taken 
in other departments. This plan must be approved 
by the Chairperson and the student's Department 
advisor by the end of the first semester of junior 
year. 

English Courses for Non-Majors 

Students majoring in other subjects have always 
been welcome in English courses, for the diver- 
sity of viewpoint and variety of knowledge they 
often bring with them. From the students' point 
of view, English courses offer the enjoyment of 
reading good literature; insight into history, cul- 
ture, and human character; and a chance to pol- 
ish skills of reading and writing. Course descrip- 
tions, particularly the more detailed ones in the 
CoRSS booklet are useful sources of information 
for such students. 

Irish Studies Program 

Irish Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach 
to the culture and society of Ireland. Individual 
courses cover the areas of social, political, and 



44 • College of Arts & Sciences • English 



economic history, literature, medieval art, soci- 
ology, folk music, and the Irish language. In ad- 
dition, there are several courses that are jointly 
taught by faculty from various disciplines. These 
include: a three-semester sequence of courses in- 
tegrating the history and literature of Ireland, 
from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries, a 
studv tour of Ireland, a one-semester course cul- 
minating in three weeks of field study in Ireland. 
Irish Studies offers a junior-year Irish Stud- 
ies Program at University College, Cork, which 
provides intensive exposure in areas of Irish cul- 
ture not normally available in the United States, 
such as Irish ethnography, folklore, and anthro- 
pology. Interested students should apply to the 
Foreign Study Office or see Professors Dalsimer 
and O'Neill of the English and History Depart- 
ments. 

Minor in Secondary Education 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences ma- 
joring in English may apply to minor in Educa- 
tion, in order to gain certification for teaching. 
The program begins in the junior year. Interested 
students should contact the Coordinator of Sec- 
ondary Education or the Associate Dean in the 
School of Education during the first semester in 
sophomore year. 

University of Nijmegen Student 
Exchange 

The English Departments of Boston College and 
the University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands 
exchange one student each year. Usually a junior 
English major goes to Nijmegen, and a graduate 
student comes here. Tuition is waived for both 
students. Nijmegen is a city of some 150,000 in- 
habitants located on the Rhine near the German 
border, and the university has 16,000 students, 
about 350-400 in the English Department. The 
Boston College student may attend both under- 
graduate and graduate courses. All teaching in the 
department is done in English, and outside the 
English Department, faculty and students usually 
have a fair knowledge of English. Interested stu- 
dents should apply to the Nijmegen Committee, 
c/o F.nglish Department, Carney Flail 449 by 
March 20. 

Honors Program 

The Knglish Department offers an honors pro- 
gram for Knglish majors. Students admitted to the 
program will write an honors thesis. Honors stu- 
dents are also encouraged to take at least one of 
the Department seminars. For details, see the 
Chairperson. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

EN 021-022 Critical Reading and Writing 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

A two-semester course designed to train students 
in the reading, analysis, and understanding of lit- 
erature and in the writing of expository and per- 
suasive prose. The literature includes significant 
works of drama, prose fiction, essay, and poetry. 
Regular writing assignments, carefully examined 
and discussed, are an important part of the course. 
EN 021-022 fulfills the Core requirement in 
Knglish. The Department 



EN 023-030, 033-036 Core English Seminar (F: 6) 

A double-credit one-semester course designed to 
provide students with an opportunity for inten- 
sive work on improving their writing. Along with 
a rigorous program of readings, discussions, and 
class presentations, students engage in continu- 
ous writing and rewriting throughout the semes- 
ter with the goal of creating effective, convincing, 
graceful prose compositions. Written work re- 
ceives individual attention both in the seminar and 
in weekly conferences with the instructor. Since 
a single semester of this course satisfies the En- 
glish Core requirement, it is intended to be as 
challenging as two semesters of Critical Reading 
and Writing. Classes are approximately half the 
size of Critical Reading and Writing sections. 
EN 023 Core English Seminar I (F: 6) Hilda Carey 

EN 024 Core English Seminar II (F: 6) 

Eileen Donovan 

EN 025 Core English Seminar III (F: 6) 

Philip O'Leary 

EN 026 Core English Seminar IV (F: 6) 

Hilda Carey 

EN 027 Core English Seminar V (F: 6) Ellen Castle 

EN 028 Core English Seminar VI (F: 6) 

Connie Griffin 

EN 029 Core English Seminar VII (F: 6) 

George O'Har 
EN 030 Core English Seminar VIII (F: 6) 

Da da Gent He I la 

EN 033 Core English Seminar IX (F: 6) 

Dorothy Miller 

EN 034 Core English Seminar X (F: 6) Betty Green 

EN 035 Core English Seminar XI (F: 6) Lad Tobin 

EN 036 Core English Seminar XII (F: 6) 

Ethan Lewis 

EN 031 Advanced Placement English (F: 3) 

A one-semester course designed exclusively for 
students who have done advanced placement work 
in high school. While class meetings are devoted 
to the analysis of a range of literary texts (drama, 
fiction, and poetry) by major authors, critical 
writing is also an important component of the 
course. Open only to AP students (who score 4 
or 5 on the AP test) and to other advanced stu- 
dents. This course does not fulfill the Core re- 
quirement. Christopher Wilson 

EN 041-042 English for Foreign Students: 
Intermediate (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is designed to enable Boston College 
students and personnel whose native language is 
not English to acquire the fluency and skill in 
English speaking, listening, writing and reading 
necessary to function satisfactorily academically 
and socially in the Boston College community. 

It is intended for Intermediate students only, 
not for beginning students. 

During the fall semester, the emphasis is on 
speaking and listening with understanding, ac- 
companied by writing assignments and the read- 
ing of short stories. The sounds and structures of 
English are examined. The second semester is a 
continuation of the first, with a quick grammati- 
cal review, and with greater concern for reading 
short stories and a novel, and for expository writ- 
ing. 

EN 041-042 is a credit course for under- 
graduates; but it does not fulfill the Core require- 



ment in English. It is a non-credit course for 
graduate students, staff, faculty spouses, etc. 

EN 043-044 English for Foreign Students: 
Advanced (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is designed to fulfill the Core require- 
ment in English for students whose native lan- 
guage is not English. It is not intended for foreign 
students whose competence in English is very 
close to that of native students. Such students 
should enroll in EN 021-022. 

Grammar, pronunciation, the structure of the 
English sentence and expository writing are dis- 
cussed both semesters. The literature read criti- 
cally will include the short story and novel the first 
semester, and drama and poetry the second. 

The Department 

EN 097-098 (SL 067-068) Continuing Modern 
Irish I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

A continuing course in modern Irish for those 
with a basic prior knowledge of the language. 
Emphasis will be on developing the ability to read 
contemporary literature in all genres. The pri- 
mary focus of the course will be on the Irish of 
Conamara, (County Galway), but other dialects 
will be studied as well, and some attention will be 
given to reading texts in the older Gaelic type in 
use through the 1940s. Philip O'Leaiy 

UN 104-107 Perspectives II, Modernism and 
the Arts (F: 6-S: 6) 

A full-year course in the literature, music, and 
visual arts, usually connected with the term "mod- 
ernism." The first eight weeks of the term will be 
devoted to literature, the last five of the first term 
and the first five of the second term to music, and 
the last eight of the second term to the visual arts. 
Among authors read during the literature seg- 
ment will be Baudelaire, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Eliot, 
Kafka, and Joyce. The composers listened to dur- 
ing the music segment will include Wagner, 
Debussy, and Stravinsky; there will be at least one 
week on jazz. The visual arts segment will empha- 
size not only painting, but also sculpture and ar- 
chitecture. This course counts towards the En- 
glish and Philosophy Core, or towards the Phi- 
losophy major, but not the English major. 

The Department 

EN 1 10 Classical and Biblical Backgrounds in 
English Literature (F: 3) 

A course designed to acquaint students with the 
classical and biblical works which form the back- 
ground of so much English literature — Homer's 
Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid, the Greek dra- 
mas, and some of the principal books of the Bible 
including Genesis, Job, the Psalms, and the Song 
of Solomon. Dayton Haskin 

EN 1 25 (PS 1 25) (SC 225) Introduction to 
Feminism (F, S: 3) 

Introduction to Feminism is an interdisciplinary 
course in which students explore the theory and 
practice of feminism in all its diversity. The read- 
ings are selected from history, sociology, psychol- 
ogy, theology, and literature. The course com- 
bines collective learning — small seminar 
groups — with periodic lectures by Women's 
Studies faculty. Lorraine Liscio 

EN 131 Studies in Poetry (F, S: 3) 

Close reading of poetry, developing the student's 
ability to ask questions which open poems to 



College of Arts & Sciences • English • 45 



analysis, and to write lucid interpretative papers. 

The Department 

EN 132 Practice of Criticism (F, S: 3) 

This course is designed for English majors who 
have completed Studies in Poetry. It is meant to 
promote intelligent writing about literary texts, 
embracing a variety of genres (fiction, drama, and 
poetry). While its concerns will include the sharp- 
ening of editorial skills and the development of 
techniques for research, its principal aim will be 
encouraging the sort of independent thinking that 
characterizes effective criticism in all its varieties. 
Limited enrollment. The Department 

Major American Writers 

Major American Writers I, II, and III follow the 
development of American literature from 1620 to 
the present. MAW I deals with American litera- 
ture up to 1865; MAW II with American litera- 
ture from 1865 to 1914; MAW III with Ameri- 
can literature from 1 9 1 4 to the present. Students 
need not take these courses in chronological or- 
der. 

EN 141 Major American Writers I ( F, S: 3) 

Paul Lewis 
James Wallace 

EN 142 Major American Writers II (F, S: 3) 

Nancy Boisvert 

Richard Schrader 

Cecil Tate 

Christopher Wilson 

EN 143 Major American Writers III (F, S: 3) 

Leonard Casper 
Laura Tanner 

EN 151 Survey of English Literature I (F: 3) 

This course is designed not only for English ma- 
jors, but for those general students majoring in 
Business, Science, History, Political Science, So- 
cial Studies and Education who may like good 
reading and who wish to expand their cultural 
horizons by following the main traditions of En- 
glish Literature from its genesis through the 1 7th 
century (EN 152 will continue this survey). De- 
signed to touch upon such issues as the history of 
ideas, the continuity/change in genres, new liter- 
ary directions, etc. The semester's work will con- 
centrate upon medieval romance, medieval 
drama, Chaucer, Renaissance drama, Renaissance 
poetry and prose, Shakespeare, and Milton. The 
course is to be of an "informational" type — to 
provide names, dates, literary forms and the like 
in their chronological sequence. John Fitzgerald 

EN 1 52 Survey of English Literature II (F: 3) 

This course is designed not only for English ma- 
jors but for those general students majoring in 
Business, Science, History, Political Science, So- 
cial Studies and Education who may like good 
reading and who wish to expand their cultural 
horizons by following the more proximate tradi- 
tions of English Literature from Cromwell's 
murder of Charles I in the Seventeenth Century 
to T. S. Eliot's Murder in the Cathedral. It is de- 
signed to touch upon such issues as the history of 
ideas, the continuity/change in genres, new liter- 
ary directions, etc. The semester's work will con- 
centrate on the political and social satire of the 
period of the seventeenth and early eighteenth 
century; Rationalism and the Age of Johnson; 



Wordsworth and the other major Romantic Po- 
ets; the chief figures in the Victorian Movement, 
and the new world of literature and criticism be- 
ginning after World War I. The course is to be 
of an "informational" type — to provide names, 
periods, literary forms and the like in their 
chronological sequence. (It is probable that many 
students will have at some time or another and in 
some course or another have read some of the 
authors and works cited during this course.) 

John Fitzgerald 

EN 161 Chaucer to Spenser (F, S: 3) 

Raymond Biggar 
Mary Crane 

EN 162 Donne to Dryden (F, S: 3) 

Dayton Haskin 
Richard Wollman 



EN 163 Pope to Keats (F, S: 3) 



Daniel McCue 
Alan Richardson 



EN 164 Tennyson to Eliot (F, S: 3) 



John McCarthy 
Dennis Taylor 



Undergraduate Electives 



EN 1 70 Introduction to Shakespeare I (F: 3) 

The dramatist's world and art as reflected in his 
major histories and comedies. P. Albert Duhaviel 

EN 171 Introduction to Shakespeare II (S: 3) 

The dramatist's world and art as reflected in his 
major tragedies. P. Albert Duhamel 

EN 237 (ED 140) Studies in Children's Literature 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This is a one-semester course that will cover some 
of the major texts in children's literature. The 
reading will vary from one semester to another, 
with each offering of the course. It will, however, 
always include some classic authors (Grimm 
Brothers, Perrault, E. B. White, Disney, Viorst, 
Wilde, Thurber, etc.). In addition, we will explore 
the various issues (censorship, sexism, racism) that 
arise in any study of children's literature. 

Bonnie Rudner 

EN 228 1 7th-Century Metaphysical Poets (F: 3) 

Close studies of the works of Greville, Donne, 
Jonson, Herbert, and Marvell after some back- 
ground on Petrarch, Wyatt, Surrey, and Spenser. 
In the 18th century, Dr. Johnson disparaged these 
poets, while T. S. Eliot, in the 20th century, al- 
most single-handedly revived them. This raises 
questions about literary taste — why we like the 
poetry or not — and about the different cultural 
reasons behind particular kinds of language. We 
will attempt to define what a metaphysical con- 
ceit is and posit reasons for why it disappeared so 
quickly from poetic practice. Richard Wollman 

EN 258 Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales (S: 3) 

A close and critical reading of most of Chaucer's 
Canterbury's Tales, exploring his innovative exploi- 
tation of genre and other expectations to create 
an unsimplistic, humane view of the human com- 
edy. A variety of critical approaches to the work 
will be considered. We shall also read Chaucer's 
Troilus and Criseyde for purposes of comparison. 
No previous knowledge of Middle English lan- 
guage or literature is assumed. A cheerful open- 
ness to the delights and quirks of Chaucer's 
Middle English is helpful. Raymond Biggar 



EN 260 Jane Austen and the Feminist 
Enlightenment (F: 3) 

Mercenary marriage, patriarchism, the impera- 
tives of propriety, accomplishments, the male 
entail, female consciousness, female friendship, 
the ambience of equality, the demystification of 
the male, the transforming wife, feminist 
affirmation, and women's duty to women as per- 
ceived in the Age of the Regency in the novels of 
Jane Austen. John McAleer 

EN 261 Faulkner and Warren (F: 3) 

A close study of some of the major works of Wil- 
liam Faulkner and Robert Penn Warren. Among 
those to be read will be Faulkner's The Sound and 
the Fury and Absalom, Absalom and Warren's All 
the King's Men, Brother to Dragons, and World 
Enough and Time. Cecil Tate 

EN 276 The Family Novel (S: 3} 

A study of the family novel tradition in England 
from the late 19th through the early 20th centu- 
ries. Likely novels include Austen's Mansfield 
Park, Dickens' Dombey and Son, Butler's The Way 
of All Flesh, Gosse's Father and Son, Galsworthy's 
The Alan of Property, Lawrence's Sons and Lovers. 
Traditional literary criticism of these books will 
be combined with the insights available from 
modern family systems theory. Dennis Taylor 

EN 277 Understanding Canadian Identities (S: 3) 

A study of contemporary Canadian literature 
written in, or translated into, English. This course 
will consider the underlying psychology of a 
"colonized" nation anxious for a multicultural 
consciousness. Addressed in the readings are 
questions surrounding regional, national and in- 
ternational identities, as well as issues of sex and 
race. Among those studied are Margaret Atwood, 
Robertson Davies, Northrop Frye, Alice Munro, 
Gabrielle Roy and selections from Inuit and Na- 
tive writers. Linda Revie 

EN 278 Stage Comedy in the Georgian Age (S: 3) 

The drama of Goldsmith, Sheridan, Garrick, 
Inchbald, Foote, Murphy, Colman, and Morton, 
a genre anchored on class differences, perceived 
as the under structure of the Georgian novel of 
manners. J°b' 1 McAleer 

EN 297 The Symbolic Pilgrimage (F: 3) 

The motif of the journey of pilgrimage, with all its 
spiritual and psychological overtones, is one of the 
oldest and most important archetypes in litera- 
ture. 

In this course, we will consider those over- 
tones, and study representative works involving 
that symbolic pilgrimage: the Books of Genesis 
and Exodus, Homer's Odyssey, "Inferno" from 
Dante's Divine Coinedy, Sir Gawain and the Green 
Knight, Book I of Spenser's Faerie Queene, John 
Bunyan's Pilgrmi's Progress, Henry Fielding's Jo- 
seph Andrews, and James Dickey's Deliverance. 
Selected writings of the late scholar- 
mythographer Joseph Campbell will be a vade 
mecum. This is a reading-intensive course, and 
students should be mindful of the work-load be- 
fore venturing forth. Richard Hughes 

EN 300 Tragic Themes of Western Literature (F: 3) 

An examination of selected tragedies in the West- 
ern literary tradition. We will read Aristotle's 
Poetics, Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Tristan and Isolde, 



46 • College of Akis & Sc ien( es • Engi bh 



Shakespeare's Macbeth, and Lowry's Under the 
I o/cano. Joseph Longo 

EN 301 British Novels of the Eighteenth 
Century (F: 3) 

This course explores the origins and early devel- 
opment of what has become the dominant mod- 
ern literary form: the novel. We consider such 
issues as the "novelty" of the genre and its ties to 
previous forms of discourse, tensions between 
historical/social "realism" and imaginative arti- 
fice, interactions of moral and aesthetic values, 
and relations between psychology an narrative 
strategy. Our texts are major works from the first 
century of British novels, by such authors as Behn, 
DeFoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Radcliffe, 
and Austen. Robot Chibka 

EN 309 James Joyce (F: 3) 

The life, times, and works, of James Joyce. Read- 
ings: Dubliners, Exiles, A Portrait of the Artist as a 
Young Man, Ulysses. Adele Dabimer 

EN 311 Dostoevsky (S: 3) 

The course will concentrate on the four major 
novels (in translation) of Fyodor Dostoevsky 
(1821-1881): Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, The 
Deiils, and The Brothers Karamazov. The focus of 
the course, while essentially literary/critical, will 
take into account the historical, religious, and 
political contexts of the novels. Richard Hughes 

EN 318 19th-century American Poetry (F: 3) 

This course places the indisputably great Ameri- 
can poets of the century, Poe, Whitman, and 
Dickinson, in the larger cultural contexts of the 
genteel tradition, women poets, and experimen- 
tal verse. Other authors include William Cullen 
Bryant, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, 
Fmerson, Jones Very, Melville, Julia Ward Howe, 
.Alice Gary, Sydney Lanier, Frances Harper, and 
Stephen Crane. James Wallace 

EN 322 Modern Arthurian Literature (S: 3) 

The course will survey a number of modern works 
connected with the "Matter of Britain," the sto- 
ries of King Arthur and his knights. The authors 
include Malory, Tennyson, Twain, Edwin Arling- 
ton Robinson, T. 1 1. White, Charles Williams, C. 
S. Lewis, and Mary Stewart. Richard Schrader 

EN 326 Shakespeare I (F: 3) 

A study of selected plays from the canon. The 
course will trace the development of Shakespeare 
and Renaissance theories of love (especially Plato, 
Christian ideals, and courtly love) and of history. 
The approach will be through an awareness of 
Shakespeare as "philosopher" (the history of 
ideas) and "dramatist" (Renaissance theatrical 
conventions). The plays selected for intensive 
analysis are Love's Labour's Lost, A Midsummer 
Night's Dream, The Tempest, Richard II, and the 
first part of Henry IV. Joseph Longo 

EN 329 Shakespeare II: The Major Tragedies 

(S:3) 

\ stnd\ of the major canon from 1600-1610. The 
focus will be Shakespeare's examination of trag- 
edy — its protagonist, experience, ideas, etc.— and 
the probability of its resolution. The approach 
will be through an awareness of Shakespeare as 
"philosopher" (the history of ideas) and "drama- 
tist" (Renaissance theatrical conventions). The 
plays selected for close analysis will be Hamlet, 



King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. The 
course is designed to offer the student of Shake- 
speare an introduction to the man and his milieu, 
with primary emphasis given to the plays rather 
than the general background. Joseph Longo 

EN 331 Courtly Love Tradition (S: 3) 

A historical survey of English and continental love 
literature from Andreas Capellanus to 
Shakespeare. The course will attempt to assess the 
significance of the tradition and to apply its chief 
characteristics to a reading of Chaucer's Troilus 
and to Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. 

Joseph Longo 

EN 340 Milton (S: 3) 

This course will focus on Milton's poetic career, 
with particular attention to those autobiographi- 
cal moments in the early poems, in some of the 
major prose, and in Paradise Lost and Samson 
Agonistes in order to attempt to define the poet's 
idea of authorship. Richard Wollman 

EN 347 Modern European Novel (S: 3) 

The course will focus on selected works of four 
major writers of the early modern period: 
Dostoevsky, Proust, Kafka and Mann. 

Andrew Von Hendy 

EN 352 Women in the Avant-Garde (S: 3) 

The avant-garde is often perceived as a predomi- 
nantly male domain, its female practitioners re- 
duced to companion or Muse, or socially 
marginalized by race, sexual preference or "mad- 
ness." We will examine this phenomenon of ex- 
clusion in the male avant-garde, but our main 
focus will be on a selection of avant-garde works 
by women in poetry, prose narrative, critical 
manifesto, painting and performance art. 

Robin Lydenberg 

EN 364 1 9th-Century British Fiction (S: 3) 

Close study of major novels by Jane Austen, 
Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, 
and Thomas Hardy, with an emphasis on the so- 
cial vision implicit in the narrative structure. 

Rosemarie Bodenheimer 

EN 370 World, Church and Novel (S: 3) 

What happens in the mind of the individual when 
the structures of Catholic faith confront the de- 
mands of adult living in the world? Is the novel 
itself, with its generic commitment to the rich 
panorama of experimental detail, somehow inevi- 
tably "on the side of the world in this conflict? 
I low have novelists imagined the lives and con- 
flicts of Catholics, men and women, lay and cleric, 
English and American, over the generations? The 
course will take up these and other questions, as 
they arise in important literary works: we will 
begin by examining Chaucer's classic figure, the 
Wife of Bath. Other works will include Mary 
Ward's Helbeck of Bunisdalc, Joyce's A Portrait of 
the Artist as a Young Man, Hemingway's The Sun 
Also Rises, Greene's The Heart of the Matter, 
Gordon's The Company of Women, and Robert 
Stone's A Flagjor Sunrise. The class will also see 
and discuss some films depicting Hollywood's 
treatment of Catholic life. Judith Wilt 

EN 377 Caribbean Women Writers (S: 3) 

This is an advanced level course on twentieth- 
century women writers from the English speak- 
ing Caribbean, although it will presume no prior 



knowledge of the authors. We will examine the 
issues of race, ethnicity and slave history, specifi- 
cally as they are bound up with expressions of a 
female identity. We will begin with Louise 
Bennett (Jamaica), whose collection of poems, 
Dialect Verse (1942), first established a distinctive 
women's voice within Caribbean literature. Other 
writers will include Jean Rhys (Dominica), Ja- 
maica Kincaid (Antigua), Olive Senior (Jamaica), 
Michelle Cliff (Jamaica). Jennifer Sharpe 

EN 378 Third World Literature (F: 3) 

This course is an introduction to the writings of 
those people formerly colonized by European 
nations. We will be looking at works that com- 
bine European with indigenous aesthetic forms to 
produce new and vital literary tradition. Since a 
comprehensive study of the enormously diversi- 
fied literatures of the so-called Third World is an 
impossible task, we will read contemporary fiction 
selected from four geographical regions: South 
Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, the West Indies and 
Latin America. Jennifer Sharpe 

EN 382 Varieties of Shorter Fiction (S: 3) 

Stories and air have this in common: we can 
scarcely open our mouths without using them. 
Narrative constructs our understandings of our- 
selves, one another, and the world we live in. This 
course explores some of the appeals, rewards, 
dangers, and logistics of narrative fiction, using 
the short story as a manageable focus that allows 
us to encounter a large number of diverse ex- 
amples in a limited time. Studying a wide range 
of nineteen th-and twentieth-century short fiction, 
we will examine in detail how specific texts work 
and approach larger formal and theoretical ques- 
tions about how stories function for both tellers 
and audiences. I am particularly interested in ad- 
dressing issues of narrative strategy and tone; psy- 
chological relations among authors, narrators, 
characters, and readers; and how writers make use 
of readers' assumptions, expectations and desires. 
Students should expect to read many stories with 
care and intensity, engage eagerly in class discus- 
sions, take regular quizzes and exams, and do a fair 
amount of writing about the fiction we read. 

Robert Chibka 

EN 395 Bildungsroman (F: 3) 

The classic bildungsroman traces the intellectual 
and emotional development of a young man from 
childhood to maturity: through a process of re- 
jection and discovery he hopes to find his hidden, 
authentic self. This course will examine seven or 
eight novels of this kind, works which vary the 
basic pattern in interesting ways. What sorts of 
rejections does the young person make? What 
sorts of discoveries? Is the process altered if the 
protagonist is a young woman? Does the call to 
maturity from within or without? What narrative 
forms seem best suited to examination of these 
issues? Kristin Morrison 

EN 398 The Poetry of Religious Experience (F: 3) 

Close reading and analysis of selected British and 
American poetry from the Renaissance to the 
present with a view to exploring ways in which 
various kinds of religious experience inform — or 
undermine — the argument, language, and imag- 
ery of poetry. The course will begin with selec- 
tions from the Old and New Testament as a way 
of raising issues and problems. Donne, Herbert, 



College oi Arts & Sciencj s • English • 47 



Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, Dickinson, Christina 
Rossetti, Hopkins, Eliot, Frost and Philip Larkin 
are among the poets to be discussed. The class will 
also read some of the most important traditional 
and contemporary theory dealing with questions 
of religion and literature. John Mahoney 

EN 410 American Fiction to 1860 (F: 3) 

This course follows the development of Ameri- 
can fiction from 1 790 to 1 860 in the work of such 
writers as Hannah P'oster, Charles Brockden 
Brown, Lydia Maria Child, Edgar Allan Poe, 
Nathaniel Hawthorne, Fanny Fern, and Herman 
Melville. Paul Lewis 

EN 412 Prose Writing (F, S: 3) 

A practical course designed to help students 
sharpen the skills needed in all forms of writing: 
finding and narrowing a subject, gathering spe- 
cific information, addressing an audience, and 
editing to achieve greater clarity and force. 
Weekly non-fiction papers and weekly confer- 
ences. This course is open to majors and non- 
majors, to all students who want to improve as 
writers. Limited enrollment. Barbara Baig 

Eileen Donovan 

Connie Griffin 

Elizabeth Kirschner 

Ethan Lewis 

Paul Lewis 

Dorothy Miller 

Susan Robots 

Bonnie Rudner 

Lad Tobin 

EN 424 American Realism (S: 3) 

An overview of the various realistic idioms em- 
ployed by Americans to survey, describe, and 
master the landscape of urban-industrial America 
from 1865-1920. While the primary writers em- 
phasized will be literary in the conventional sense 
(Howells, Wharton, Jewett, Crane, Cather, 
Dreiser), we may also look at photography (Riis, 
Hine), painting (Eakins, Homer), and other forms 
of social documentation (e.g., urban journalism, 
applied psychology). The attempt will be made to 
root such idioms in their social and historical prac- 
tice. Christopher Wilson 

EN 429 Literary Biography (F: 3) 

Through journals, memoirs, diaries, letters, and 
autobiographical accounts one learns how expe- 
rience, education, reading, heritage, family and 
friends impinge on the creative mind, as perceived 
in Austen, Dreiser, Stout, and Hemingway. 

John McAleer 

EN 430 Literature and Journalism in America 

(S:3) 

This course will focus on the interaction between 
"imaginative" literary forms and nonfictional 
news reporting from the late 19th century to the 
present. Our main focus will be crime reporting 
and foreign correspondence (from the Civil War 
to Vietnam and El Salvador), with forays into the 
"new" journalism and current news criticism. 
Authors covered will include Robert Sam Anson, 
Stephen Crane, Jacob Riis, Joan Didion, Michael 
Herr,John Reed, and others. Christopher Wilson 

EN 439 Conquest of the Americas (F: 3) 

In the recent movie, Black Robe, a young Jesuit 
missionary manipulates the Algonquins with 



whom he is travelling by demonstrating that he 
can communicate messages silently by means of 
writing. But his act also helps to persuade the in- 
digenes that he is not a normal human being. The 
episode epitomizes the European conquest of the 
Americas in literary terms; that is as the result of 
a clash between oral and literature cultures. This 
course is a broad examination of the nature and 
consequences of this clash throughout the Ameri- 
cas in literary terms; that is, as the result of a clash 
throughout the Americas. It will begin by consid- 
ering the differences between oral storytelling and 
what we're familiar with, proceed through the 
study of Amerindian mythologies to Western 
narratives of the conquest and conclude with ex- 
amples of the incorporation of oral elements 
within recent fiction by and about indigenous 
Americans. Andrew Von Hendy 

EN 449 Fitzgerald and Hemingway (S: 3) 
A chronological survey of the works of F. Scott 
Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, studying both 
the man and the myth to show how each was vic- 
timized by the myth in different ways. 

John Randall 

EN 452 Southern Renascence (F: 3) 

A study of selected major works of American writ- 
ers of the South. Among those to be read will be 
William Faulkner, Carson McCullers, and 
Flannery O'Connor. Cecil Tate 

EN 460 Modern American Short Story (S: 3) 

Collections of short stories by American authors 
of this century. Authors: James Baldwin, Cynthia 
Ozick, Ernest Hemingway, Flannery O'Connor, 
John Cheever, Raymond Carver, Andre Dubus, 
and Alice Munro. Paul Doheity 

EN 462 19th-century Children's Literature (S: 3) 

In this course we will explore the relations be- 
tween the traditional fairy tale and the children's 
book in the 19th century, the "golden age" of 
children's literature. Concentrating on such au- 
thors as Ruskin, Thackeray, MacDonald, Carroll, 
Wilde, Nesbit, Ingelow, and Rossetti, we will 
consider the English tradition of fantasy literature 
for children as a complex cultural phenomenon. 
Literary analysis of the texts will be accompanied 
by historical, feminist, psychoanalytical, and an- 
thropological approaches. Alan Richardson 

EN 469 Plays of O'Neill, Miller, Williams, and 
Albee (F: 3) 

In-depth search for meaning through motif, in 
major plays by four outstanding American Dra- 
matists. Leonard Casper 

EN 482 (BK 410) Afro-American Writers (F: 3) 

A study of "classic" and non-canonical texts of 
Afro-American literature. Works by Terry, 
Wheatly, Dunbar, Toomer, Baldwin, Ellison, 
Wright, Walker, Morrison, and others will be 
examined in their own right and in cross-cultural 
perspective. Short works by Faulkner, O'Connor, 
Harris and others provide useful comparisons of 
the Afro-American and American literary tradi- 
tions. Henry Blackwell 

EN 483 Contemporary African American 
Narratives (S: 3) 

African American fiction, autobiography and bi- 
ography since 1975. Hemy Blackwell 



EN 485 Special Projects in African American 
Cultural Studies (F: 3) 

This course provides an opportunity for the 
promising student to think and read deeply about 
a subject with dynamic potential. The require- 
ments are the completion of an approved, writ- 
ten project of some complexity and length, con- 
stant attendance, three oral reports and a willing- 
ness to do research and to discuss it with nine 
other students. Henry Blackwell 

EN 486 The Drama of Ethnic Renaissance: 
Theater and Society in Early Twentieth-Century 
Dublin and Harlem (S: 3) 

The course will examine two cases of "ethnic re- 
naissance" in English-language theater and cul- 
ture, the Irish dramatic movement of Yeats, Gre- 
gory, Synge, and the Fays; and the dramatic wing 
of the Harlem Renaissance, initiated by Du Bois. 
Problems to be explored will include the attempt 
to create an inclusive group identity, the exorcism 
of negative stage and media images from the 
dominant culture, the conscious re-writing of 
historical episodes, the place of dialect and rural 
folk material in dramas written for urban audi- 
ences, the relation of the theaters to political 
movements, the frequent friction with factions of 
the audience, and the divisive effect of plays of 
urban poverty such as O'Casey's Juno and the 
Paycock and Thurman's Harlan. Readings will 
include manifestos and statements of purpose 
from birth movements, playscripts, reviews, and 
some biographical and historical material. 

Philip O'Leary 

EN 500 (HS 418) Politics and Literature in 18th 
and 19th Century Ireland (F: 3) 

This course will examine the relationship between 
literature and politics in 18th and 19th century 
Ireland. Major works of Irish literature of this 
period will be considered in the light of their so- 
cial and political origins, their subsequent effect 
on political conceptualization and action. Among 
the writers to be considered are Swift, Merriman, 
Maria Edgeworth, William Carlton, Charles 
Kickham. This course is taught jointly with Pro- 
fessor Kevin O'Neill of the History Department. 
Adele Dalsimer/Kevin O'Neill 

EN 502 Abbey Theatre Summer Workshop 
(Summer: 6) 

The Abbey Theatre Program, a six-week Summer 
Workshop in Dublin, consists of an intensive five 
weeks of classes, lectures, and demonstrations by 
members of the Abbey Theatre Company in act- 
ing, directing, production, and management, cul- 
minating in the staging of an Irish play. There will 
also be lectures in the history of Irish theatre. A 
week of travel, at will, in Ireland will be provided 
at the end of the workshop. Interested students 
should apply to Professor Philip O'Leary, English 
Department before March 1. Philip O'Leary 

EN 507 20th-century Irish Fiction (S: 3) 

A study of both long and short fiction by a vari- 
ety of important Irish writers (excluding Joyce): 
John Banville, Samuel Beckett, M. J. Farrell 
(Molly Keane), Michael McLavcrty, Flann 
O'Brien, Frank O'Connor, William Trevor, and 
others. Kristin Morrison 



48 • College of Arts & Sciences • English 



EN 520 Topics in Contemporary Theory (F: 3) 

This is an introductory- course designed to famil- 
iarize undergraduates with some aspects of criti- 
cal theory: deconstruction, psychoanalytic criti- 
cism, feminism, and cultural criticism. The course 
will not be organized as a comprehensive survey 
of these and other critical schools; instead, we will 
explore several sets of readings clustered around 
a particular topic. Robin Lydenberg 

EN 526 Shakespeare: Early Plays (F: 3) 

In this course we will read a selection of 
Shakespeare's Elizabethan plays. The syllabus is 
likely to include plays selected from among his 
earlier comedies (including,^ Midsummer Night's 
Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, and 
others), histories (including Richard III, and oth- 
ers) and tragedies (including Romeo and Juliet). 

Mary Crane 

EN 529 Shakespeare: Later Plays (S: 3) 

This course will focus on the later (seventeenth- 
century) plays of Shakespeare in their cultural 
context. Plays to be read may include Twelfth 
Night, T roil us and Cressida, Measure for Measure, 
Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, 
Coriolanus, Pericles, The Winter's Tale, and The 
Tempest. Mary Crane 

EN 533 British Novels of the Eighteenth 
Century (F: 3) 

This course explores the origins and early devel- 
opment of what has become the dominant mod- 
ern literary form: the novel. We consider such 
issues as the "novelty" of the genre and its ties to 
previous forms of discourse, tensions between 
historical/social "realism" and imaginative arti- 
fice, interactions of moral and aesthetic values, 
and relations between psychology and narrative 
strategy. Our texts are major works from the first 
century of British novels, by such authors as Behn, 
DeFoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Radcliffe, 
and Austen. Robert Chibka 

EN 536 The Modern Irish Short Story (F: 3) 

This course will examine the generations of Irish 
story tellers who since James Joyce have made the 
short story an art form in the realist tradition. The 
reading includes selected stories from Liam 
O'Flaherty, Frank O'Connor, Sean O'Faolain, 
Elizabeth Bowen, Mary Lavin, Michael 
McLaverty, Edna O'Brien, and William Trevor. 

Margaret Dever 

EN 539 Homer, Dante, Joyce (S: 3) 

The major books will be The Odyssey, The Divine 
Comedy, Hamlet; and (in the second half of the 
semester) Ulysses. The course will address ques- 
tions about the nature of the person, society, and 
language in the times of each of the authors. 

Paul Doherty 

EN 540 Romantic Writing (F: 3) 

In this course we will ignore the conventional 
boundaries between genres (as many Romantic 
writers did themselves) in an effort to forge new 
connections among a number of early nineteenth- 
century texts. In addition to poems by 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats, we 
will read novels by VY'ollstonccraft (Maria), I logg 
(Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sin- 
ner), and Mary Shelley (Frankenstein), Dorothy 
Wordsworth's journals and Keats' letters, 



DeQuincey's Confessions of an English Opium Eater 
and Lamb's Essays ofElia. Alan Richardson 

EN 545 Modern Drama (F, S: 3) 

The fall course will examine the "modern" as a 
new kind of watchfulness: of watching, and of 
being watched (and watched, watching). Modern 
writers often saw the drama as a form of liberat- 
ing experimentation and political revolt. Yet the 
drama is particularly dependent upon and vulner- 
able to forms of collective coercion. How can 
existing authorities be subverted in a formal way 
that is not betrayed by the containment of form? 
Writers may include: Ibsen, Stein, Kennedy, 
Churchill, Chekhov, Brecht, Strindberg, Lorca, 
Genet, Artaud, Beckett, Williams and O'Neill. 

In the spring we will study major trends in 
British drama since World War II with emphasis 
on Samuel Beckett. Anne Fleche 

Kristin Morrison 

EN 577 Writing Workshop: Poetry (F, S: 3) 

In the fall, the course will provide training by 
practice in the writing of poetry. Class meetings 
will be mostly group discussions of work submit- 
ted by our members, but will be devoted occasion- 
ally to technical exercises directed by the instruc- 
tor. The instructor will also confer with each stu- 
dent at regular intervals about work in progress. 
A chapbook often finished poems will be due at 
the end of the semester. 

The course as taught in the spring is for the 
dedicated poet as well as the more general student 
interested in training the eye and the mind 
through the discipline of verse writing. Students' 
own poems from both open and directed writing 
assignments, will become the text for this work- 
shop, in addition to some handouts provided by 
the instructor for discussion on metrical and free 
verse technique. Andrew Von Hendy 

Suzanne Matson 

EN 579 Writing Workshop: Fiction (F, S: 3) 

An intense course in the training of writers of 
short fiction, directed toward professional mar- 
kets. 

This course provides encouragement, prac- 
tice, and criticism for students who are seriously 
interested in writing short (or, possibly, not-so- 
short) fiction. The workshop format — class dis- 
cussions of student writing and frequent confer- 
ences with the instructor — demands self-motiva- 
tion and willing participation on the part of stu- 
dents. Students are expected to produce a steady 
stream of fiction throughout the semester. Nar- 
rative preferences from the traditional to the ex- 
perimental are welcome. Emphasis in making 
choices, inventing voices, and making the story 
work better. Enrollment limited to 15. 

Leonard Casper 
Robert Chibka 

EN 582 Writing Workshop: Film Script (F: 3) 

This film script course uses film adaptation of 
novels and short stories as a training course for 
the students' script writing. Double exposure to 
narrative art and to the craft and art of film allows 
the student to evaluate both final products and the 
methods of adaptation. In The Music Lesson, Tess, 
The French Lieutenant's Woman, and Sophie's 
Choice, how and how effectively were these films 
adapted? 



Much help will be provided by Joy Gould 
Boyum's Double Exposure, plus her evaluations of 
16 narrative adaptations — which leaves us choices. 
Calvin Skaga's The American Short Stoiy provides 
9 short stories with full or partial film scripts, di- 
rector interviews, and authoritative reviews — 
which leaves us choices. Joseph McCaffeity 

EN 588 Writing Workshop: Business (F: 3) 

In the modern world, effective communication is 
essential for success. This course teaches you how 
to plan your writing, how to gather materials, how 
to put your ideas in order, how to design and 
employ graphic aids, how to revise and edit your 
work. The course emphasizes clarity, complete- 
ness, conciseness and correctness. Examples and 
exercises are taken from the business world, but 
the principles taught are useful for most kinds of 
writing. This course is not remedial. Limited 
enrollment. Daniel McCue, Jr. 

EN 590 Literary Boston (S: 3) 

The cultural ascendary of Boston studied in the 
fiction of James, Howells, Marquand, O'Connor, 
Martin, Parker, Langton, McDonald, Barnes, 
Healy, Kelly, Tapply, and Boyer. John McAleer 

EN 591 Scholar of the College Project 

By arrangement The Depaitment 

EN 596 The Romantic Movement in England (S: 3) 

The development of Romanticism in 19th-cen- 
tury England. The course will focus on the ma- 
jor poetry and literary theory of Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats with some 
consideration of the literary traditions and circles 
in which they wrote. Students will also read some 
of the best traditional and contemporary criticism 
of the poetry. John Mahoney 

EN 599 Undergraduate Reading and Research 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

By arrangement The Department 

EN 603 Seminar in College Teaching: Women's 
Studies (F, S: 3) 

This course is for students who have taken Intro- 
duction to Feminism and who have been chosen 
to lead discussions in seminar groups. They meet 
weekly with the faculty advisor to discuss weekly 
assigned readings — interdisciplinary feminist 
readings — and with their respective seminar 
groups in Introduction to Feminism. Permission 
of Instructor necessary. Lorraine Liscio 

EN 605 Seminar: Women Poets: Plath, Sexton, 
Rich (S: 3) 

The course will focus on three American women 
poets who came of age in the late 1950s and, in 
their writing, effected a revolution of sorts for 
women's poetry. Since writing from a personal, 
gendered voice and using their own experience as 
poetic material was an important part of their 
poetics, one of our primary tasks will be to exam- 
ine the critical frames we place around "autobi- 
ography" and poetry, and relate these to gender 
and poetic voice. To do this, we will read a vari- 
ety of texts: the collected poetry of each poet, plus 
some essays, biographies, letters, and journals. 

Suzanne Matson 

EN 622 (UN 506) Capstone: Planning for 
Success and Failure (S: 3) 

"Where do we come from? What are we? Where 
are we going?" (Gauguin) This course is a con- 



College of Arts & Sciences • Fine Arts • 49 



eluding meditation on the fundamental questions 
facing students about to graduate. Such questions, 
about family and career, spiritual journey and citi- 
zenship, will be explored in works of literature. 
Emphasis will be on journal keeping as a lifelong 
skill, formulating life problems, structuring in- 
sights, preparing for success and failure. Students 
will be asked to select the most significant texts 
read in their college career. Other works will be 
chosen from a family novel (Father and Son), and 
family therapy text (The Family Crucible), a spiri- 
tual journal (An Interrupted Life), a novel about 
marriage and career (Middlemarch or Robert 
Elsmere) and about the land (My Antonio). 

Dennis Taylor 

EN 626 American Studies Seminar: American 
Culture in Contemporary Nonfiction (F: 3) 

Since the early 1980s, many analysts agree, the 
gap between rich and poor, black and white, has 
only widened. This course will explore the expe- 
rience within, and between, these two ever-more 
divergent "societies" within contemporary Ameri- 
can culture. In a sense our central concern will be 
how American culture "talks to itself across the 
divide. Our vehicle for this exploration will be 
reading, and then imitation of, nonfiction writ- 
ers Christopher Wilson 

EN 627 (UN 513) Capstone: Ways of Knowing 

(S:3) 

This course will ask what we already know — about 
ourselves and the times in which we have lived, 
about the world of ideas, and about the environ- 
ments we create and inhabit. It will also ask how 
we know, how our perspectives as members of 
families and communities, as men and women, as 
students and workers, and as consumers of cul- 
ture influence the intellectual and personal 
choices we make. We will draw primarily on lit- 
erary and historical texts, but also on architecture, 
music and film, to work toward a consciousness 
about the decisions we have made and the choices 
available to us in the cultures in which we live. 
Among the texts for the course are John Updike, 
Rabbit Run; Annie DWYard, An American Childhood; 
Anne Moody, Coining of Age in Mississippi; Jeff 
Thielmann, Volunteer: With the Poor in Peru; Scott 
Walker, ed., Stories from the American Mosaic. 

Carol Hurd Green 

EN 632 (BK 303) (UN 512) Capstone: The Work 
of Knowing in African American Life and Art 
(ft 3) 

"/ wonder if the world is anchored anywhere?" 

'(Melville) 
"The Way is dying. So what is the Way?" (Olson) 
After graduation, one learns — all of a sudden — 
that what looked like a smooth path to a happy 
and successful life is often filled with undreamed- 
of obstacles and complication. Especially in the 
areas of work, play, love, spirituality and political 
commitment, we are confronted by a vast muddle 
of choices and decisions, behind which lurk dan- 
ger, opportunity, and serious conflicts between 
what we owe to ourselves and what we owe to 
others, who are our families, our "center," a 
"stillpoint" from which to draw strategies and 
convictions, which have the power to help us to 
live honorably, meaningfully and deliberately. 
Our major texts will be the lives of black role 
models and a daily journal of our own. The course 



also requires an interview with a family member 
or public figure, a trip to a lecture, or a movie or 
play, and the reading of novels, autobiographies 
and biographies of black people who have faced 
our problems. Henry Blackwell 

EN 633 Seminar: American Cross-Cultural 
Literatures (S: 3) 

A seminar in selected titles by American writers 
of African, Hispanic, Asian, and Native descent. 

Leonard Casper 

EN 636 Seminar: Women and Film: An 
Introduction to Film Aesthetics (F: 3) 

This course will introduce styles, techniques and 
directors, silent era to the present, with a focus 
on women on both sides of the camera. In addi- 
tion to screenings there will be readings and ex- 
aminations on film history, technique and theory, 
plus two papers and a final exam. Directors may 
include: Eisenstein, Murnau, Renoir, Ford, 
Hitchcock, Potter, Deren, Rainer. Anne Fleche 

EN 637 Seminar: American Modernism: Writing 
the Wasteland (F: 3) 

This course will explore the narrative and poetic 
strategies that modern American writers develop 
to speak the chaos of their fragmented world. 
How, we will ask, do modern American writers 
perceive and manipulate the words and forms that 
are the most basic tools of their trade? How do 
they respond to the problem of forging a link 
between language and experience? Texts will in- 
clude poetry by Eliot, Bogan, Stevens, and 
Hughes, as well as fiction by Hemingway, 
Faulkner, Hurston and Wright. Laura Tanner 



EN 660 (SL 360) Teaching English as a Foreign 
Language (F: 3) 

The first part of this course is an overview of theo- 
ries of foreign language acquisition from the late 
19th century to the current scene. The second 
part examines specific problems in the teaching 
and learning of English by speakers of other lan- 
guages: questions, negation, articles, pronouns, 
preposition, and verb complementation. This 
course is intended for students interested in the 
structure of English and for those curious about 
how adults learn a foreign language, as well as for 
students with a professional interest in teaching 
English to non-native speakers. Previous course- 
work in linguistics or extensive study of foreign 
languages will be helpful but is not required for 
enrollment. Margaret Thomas 

EN 699 Old English (S: 3) 

A survey of English literature from the beginnings 
to 1066. The language will be learned while se- 
lected prose texts are read; followed by a number 
of poetic masterpieces such as Battle of 
Brunanburh, Battle ofMaldon, Judith, Wanderer, 
Seafarer, Wife's Lament. Other poems, including 
Beowulf, may be dealt with partly or wholly in 
translation. Richard Schroder 



I N 



A 



FACULTY 

Pamela Berger, Professor; A.B., A.M., Cornell 
University; Ph.D., New York University 

John Michalczyk, Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 
College; M.Div., Weston College School of 
Theology; Ph.D., Harvard University 

John Steczynski, Professor; B.F.A., Notre 
Dame University; M.F.A., Yale University 

Josephine von Henneberg, Professor; Doctor 
in Letters, University of Rome 

Kenneth M. Craig, Associate Professor; B.A., 
M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Bryn 
Mawr College 

Jeffery W. Howe, Associate Professor, Chairper- 
son of the Department; A.B., Carleton College; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Michael W. Mulhern, Associate Professor; 
B.F.A., University of Dayton; M.F.A., Colum- 
bia University 

Elizabeth G. Await, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Boston College; M.F.A., University of Pennsyl- 
vania 

Nancy Netzer, Assistant Professor; B.A., Con- 
necticut College; M.A., Tufts University; M.A., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 



R T 



Reva Wolf, Assistant Professor; B.A., Brandeis 
University; M.A., Ph.D., Institute of Fine Arts, 
New York University 

Andrew Tavarelli, Visiting Artist and Adjunct 
Assistant Professor; B.A., Queens College 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department offers two majors, one in Art 
History and another in Studio Art. A wide range 
of courses in film-making, film history, film criti- 
cism and photography is also provided by the 
Department. Advanced students may participate 
in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts Seminar Pro- 
gram, which offers art history courses taught by 
the museum staff. For details, inquire at the Fine 
Arts Department office. 

Art History 

The major in Art History offers the interested 
student an opportunity to develop a knowledge 
and understanding of the visual environment cre- 
ated by humans in the course of time. The De- 
partmental courses provide both a broad founda- 
tion in the humanities and the preparation for 
further work that can lead to professional careers 
in art: teaching and research, curatorships, con- 
servation, educational positions in museums and 



50 • College of Arts & Sciences • Fine Arts 



art centers, occupations as art critic or employ- 
ment in the art business world such as commer- 
cial galleries and auction houses. Students major- 
ing in Art History plan integrated programs in 
consultation with their Department advisors. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to take as many courses as 
possible in history, literature, philosophy, foreign 
languages, and other fields related to their special- 
ization. For the Art History major a minimum of 
1 1 courses must be completed in the following 
way: 

1. FA 101-102 Introduction to Art History (2 
courses), FA 103-104 Art History Workshop (2 
courses) normally to be completed by the end of 
the sophomore year. 

2. Seven additional courses of which four must 
have FA numbers at or above the 300 level and 
three must have FA numbers at or above the 200 
level. At least one course must be chosen from each 
of the following periods: 

• Ancient Art 

• Medieval Art 

• Renaissance through Eighteenth Century Art 

• Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art 

3. FA 401 Seminar in Art Historical Research (3 
credits) is required and must be taken during the 
junior or senior year. This course may be counted 
as one of the seven courses listed in paragraph 2 
above. 

Double Majors in the Department must fulfill all 
requirements for both majors. 

Studio Art 

Studio Art Majors are required to take a minimum 
of 12 courses for a total of 36 credits, to be dis- 
tributed as indicated below. 
(The program is to be worked out in consultation 
with the department advisor.) 

1. FS 101, 102, 103 Foundations of Studio Art (9 
credits) Drawing, Painting, Sculpture 

2. FA 101-102, Introduction to Art History (6 
credits) 

3. FS 221, Color 

4. Six additional courses with FS numbers. These 
must include FS 300, Major Course: Juniors and 
Seniors; the senior project (FS 498), and at least 
one additional 300 level course. Students must 
have taken at least 4 semesters of work relating 
to their senior project prior to the senior year. 

5. Portfolio reviews are required in the second 
semester of the sophomore and junior years. 

6. In addition to the required courses, the follow- 
ing are recommended: FA 257-258, Modern Art; 
FA 355, From Gauguin to Dali; FA 361, Issues 
in Contemporary Art 

7. Summer travel and summer courses are also 
recommended for enrichment. Consult depart- 
ment advisor. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
Art History 

FA 101-102 Introduction to Art History (F: 3-5:3) 

I he fundamental course for understanding and 
enjoying the visual arts: painting, sculpture and 
architecture. The major monuments in the his- 
tory of art will be discussed in their historical and 
cultural context beginning with ancient Egyptian 
art through the art of the medieval period in the 
first semester. This course will examine some 



earlier material from an archaeological perspec- 
tive but its main emphasis will be on style and 
meaning in art. The class meets for two slide lec- 
tures and one small discussion group per week. 
Assignments will include museum visits and study 
of significant works of art in greater Boston. (Re- 
naissance through modern art is taught in FA 102 
in the spring). This course may be taken for Core 
credit. Pamela Berger 

Kenneth Craig 
Reva Wolf 

FA 103-104 Art History Workshop (F: 3-S: 3) 

The primary objective of this two-semester course 
is to expose the student to a series of problems in 
order to understand more fully the formal and 
technical aspects of works of art studied in the 
general survey of art history (FA 101-102). Cri- 
tiques and discussions also try to develop greater 
aesthetic sensitivity. Required for art history ma- 
jors. No prerequisites. Aileen Callahan 

FA 107 History of Architecture (F: 3) 

The evolution of architectural styles in the west- 
ern world. Consideration will be given to the his- 
torical, religious, social, political and structural 
problems that influenced development of those 
styles. This course may be taken for Core credit. 

The Department 

FA 108 Great Art Capitals of Europe (S: 3) 

For art historians, art lovers, urbanists and trav- 
elers. The course deals with the cities that led the 
Western world in artistic accomplishments, 
among them Athens, Rome, Paris, and London. 
In these cities art styles were born and often 
reached their finest expression. Emphasis will be 
placed on the art that is collected in the museums 
and monuments of each city. The growth of each 
city will be traced and the historic styles that 
shaped it defined. This course may be taken for 
Core credit. 

Not open to students who have taken FA 101 

or FA 1 02 . Pamela Berger 

Josephine von Henneberg 

FA 109 Aspects of Art (F, S: 3) 

This course will attempt to view Western art in 
terms of a number of universal considerations. 
Specific objects will be investigated with regard 
to such issues as structure, form, color, light, com- 
position and the like. We propose, then, to avoid 
the usual approach to art as an historical sequence 
of works and styles and replace this with a method 
based on concepts. This should result in an alter- 
nate means of comparison and evaluation that will 
prove as valuable as the more traditional modes. 
This course may be taken for Core credit. 

Not open to students who have taken FA 101, 
FA 102, or FA 108. The Department 

FA 1 75 Asian Art Survey (F: 3) 

A survey of Far Eastern art from ancient times to 
the present, designed to provide a broad histori- 
cal and cultural framework. Major monuments, 
important stylistic trends, and basic terminology 
and iconography will be emphasized. This course 
may be taken for Core credit. 

Normajean Calderwood 

FA 181 History of European Film (F: 3) 

From a close study of various European films one 
detects certain patterns which are in retrospect 
designated as movements. Utilizing a survey ap- 



proach, the course examines the principal move- 
ments of Expressionism in Germany, Neo-real- 
ism in Italy, and the New Wave in France with 
an occasional maverick film that becomes monu- 
mental in the history of cinema. Lectures, read- 
ings, and discussion will reinforce the multiple 
viewing of films. This course may be taken for 
Core credit. John Michalczyk 

FA 182 Documentary Film* (S: 3) 

A film is not created in a vacuum, but represents 
the historical, social, economic and political mi- 
lieu from which it emanates. The documentary 
works of the master — Flaherty, Resnais, Ivens, 
Capra and Riefenstahl — will serve as an indisput- 
able witness to these complex zones in our con- 
temporary culture. Lab fee: $55.00 

John Michalczyk 

FA 212 (CL 212) Art of the Ancient 
Mediterranean World (F: 3) 

The visual history and arts of the Ancient Medi- 
terranean world will be studied from the rise of 
civilizations along the Nile, in the Holy Land, and 
Mesopotamia to the fall of the western Roman 
Empire, about 480. Cities, sacred areas, palaces, 
and building for communication, civic services 
and war will be included, as well as painting, sculp- 
ture, jewelry, and coinages. 

The fall term will begin with Egypt and 
Mesopotamia, and will emphasize Greek Art, 
through Philip and Alexander the Great, to the 
beginning of the Roman Empire. 

The spring term will be devoted to Roman Art 
in its broadest sense, beginning with the Helle- 
nistic world after Alexander the Great and mov- 
ing to Etruscan and Greek Italy in the Roman 
Republic, and then to the Roman Empire. This 
course may be taken for Core credit. 

Cornelius Vertneule 

FA 221 Early Medieval Art (F: 3) 

This course treats the Early Medieval period in 
the East and West. The catacombs, the sar- 
cophagi, the illuminated manuscripts, the mosa- 
ics and wall paintings will be studied with a view 
to giving the students a method of approaching 
individual works of art, a method that should pro- 
vide them with a language for analyzing and in- 
terpreting the art work of various ages. This 
course may be taken for Core credit. 

Pamela Berger 

FA 222 Art of the Later Medieval World (S: 3) 

This course treats the arts of the Late Byzantine, 
Romanesque and Gothic periods: architecture, 
sculpture, mosaics, wall paintings, illuminated 
manuscripts and stained glass windows will be 
treated. This course may be taken for Core credit. 

Pamela Berger 

FA 231 Arts of the Italian Renaissance: 
Quattrocento (F: 3) 

This course will survey developments in art from 
the fourteenth to the fifteenth century. Painting, 
sculpture and architecture will be considered, and 
their developments followed in Florence and 
other artistic centers in Central and Northern 
Italy. Artists to be studied will include, among 
others, Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Ghiberti, 
Brunelleschi, AJberti, Botticelli, and Leonardo. 
This course maybe taken for Core credit. 

The Department 



College of Arts & Sciences • Fine Arts • 51 



FA 232 Northern Renaissance Art (F: 3) 

Painting in the Netherlands and Germany in the 
15th and 16th centuries. Emphasis will be on the 
style and the meaning of the great works of the 
masters of Northern Renaissance Art such as Jan 
and Hubert van Eyck, Robert Campin, Rogier van 
der Weyden, Hieronymus Bosch, Pieter Bruegel, 
Mathias Grunewald and Albrecht Durer. Open 
without prerequisites. This course may be taken 
for Core credit. Kenneth Craig 

FA 251 Modern Architecture (S: 3) 

The evolution of modern architectural form from 
the late eighteenth century revival styles to indi- 
vidual architects of the twentieth century such as 
F.L. Wright, Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, Le 
Corbusier. This course may be taken for Core 
credit. The Department 

FA 256 Impressionism and Neo-lmpressionism 
(F, S: 3) 

This course focuses on the development of Im- 
pressionism and Neo-lmpressionism in France, 
from Monet to van Gogh. After a study of the 
intellectual and artistic roots of these trends, the 
style and subject matter of individual artists, and 
their relation to the social and political history of 
the time, is considered. In addition, attention is 
paid to how the interpretation of Impressionism 
and Neo-lmpressionism has evolved since the 
later nineteenth century. The Department 

FA 257-258 Modern Art: 19th and 20th 
Centuries (F: 3-S: 3) 

An introduction to art in the western world from 
the late 1 8th century to the present. The work of 
some of the major painters and sculptors will be 
seen in relation to the contemporary cultural and 
political ferment which helped shape it whilst 
being shaped by it in turn. The course extends 
over two semesters; either semester may be taken 
separately. The fall semester will cover Neoclas- 
sicism through Impressionism. Artists studied in 
the first segment include: David, Goya, Turner, 
Monet and Rodin. Spring semester begins with 
Post-Impressionism and ends with contemporary- 
art. Artists covered include: Van Gogh, Matisse, 
Picasso, Brancusi, Duchamp, Pollock. This course 
may be taken for Core credit. Jejfery W. Howe 

RevaWolf 

FA 264 The Arts in America (S: 3) 

The objective of this course is to introduce the 
student to the social, philosophical and formal 
currents that have contributed to the art of this 
century. In a pluralistic society such as ours, a wide 
variety of styles, ranging from realism to abstrac- 
tion, have managed to express particular facets of 
our culture. We will attempt to examine each of 
these. Beginning with the last generation of the 
nineteenth century, encompassing such figures as 
Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, and Mary 
Cassatt, we will trace the evolution of the visual 
arts in this century up to the present. Somewhat 
greater emphasis will be given to the work done 
after World War II, when American artists began 
to make their most revolutionary statements. 
Subjects to be considered will include the Ash Can 
School, Dada, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art 
and Post Modernism. The Department 



FA 267 From Salt-Box to Skyscraper: Architecture 
in America 1 7th-20th Centuries (F: 3) 

This course will trace the development of archi- 
tecture in America from colonial times to the 
present. Particular attention will be paid to monu- 
ments in New England, with field trips to impor- 
tant buildings in the Boston Area. In addition to 
studying stylistic changes, the class will consider 
the significance of changes in building technol- 
ogy and social needs for the history of architec- 
ture. This course may be taken for Core credit. 

The Depanment 

FA 278 Arts in Japan (S: 3) 

Although Japanese art was influenced by Chinese 
art, it had a distinct character of its own and main- 
tained its originality from the beginning. Whereas 
Chinese art was one of dignity and seriousness, 
the Japanese found pleasure in relating art to man 
and his activities, and a large element of humor is 
present in their works. Love of nature inspired a 
fine landscape tradition in their painting. Their 
strong interest in genre scenes became best known 
in the West through woodcuts of the Ukiyo-ye 
school, which had a strong influence in Impres- 
sionism. Decorative design is probably their 
greatest genius, and is not matched by any other 
culture in the Far East. This is best illustrated by 
all articles of daily use, where they placed great 
value on the visual impact of the object at hand. 
There are no prerequisites for this course. All 
elements of Japanese art will be studied through 
slides. There will be visits to the collections of the 
Museum of Fine Arts. Normajean Caldeiivood 

FA 282 Political Fiction Film (F: 3) 

In war and peace, political fiction film has often 
served as a dramatic means to deliver an ideologi- 
cal message. Using action and suspense, this type 
of film can entertain while provoking an audience 
to accept a specific cause. Its roots go back to 
Griffith's Civil War epic Birth of a Nation (1915), 
a film accused of promoting racism and glorify- 
ing the KKK. During WW II with such popular 
films as Casablanca, Hollywood directors offered 
patriotic messages to an American audience with 
its recent history of isolationism. More recently, 
Costa-Gavras' Z (1969) has provided a new im- 
petus to the genre by combining thriller elements 
with a non-conventional political perspective. 
Features such as Silkivood, Norma Rae and All the 
President's Men reflect this engaging combination 
of elements. Through readings, screenings, and 
discussion of these and other works, we are able 
to analyze the dual components of drama and 
politics in a chronological manner. 

John Michalczyk 

FA 286 Nineteenth and Twentieth Century 
Photographic History (S: 3) 

A survey of photographic imagery and technol- 
ogy from 1839 until the present day in France, 
England and the United States. Beginning with 
the period from 1839 to turn-of-the century 
Pictorialism, this course emphasizes trends, 
themes and major developments, and discusses 
the cross-influences between photography and 
painting. The course continues with an overview 
of the contributions of Pictorialism and will show 
the evolution from Straight Photography to mod- 
ern-day photography. The major photographers 
and developments of art photography will be the 



basis for the course, but documentary photogra- 
phy and photojournalism will also be covered. 
Readings will focus on 20th century photographic- 
criticism. This course may be taken for Core 
credit. Deborah Kao 

FA 287 Documentary Photography (F: 3) 

This course chronicles the history, theory, and 
social impact of documentary photography from 
the invention of the medium in 1839 to the 
present day. The unique mimetic qualities of 
photography and photomechanical processes 
revolutionized the use of visual images as tools for 
documentary persuasion. We will focus on spe- 
cific documentary projects, such as A.J. Russell's 
Great West Illustrated, Brassai's The Secret Paris of 
the 1930s, and Robert Frank's The Americans, as 
case studies to explicate issues of ideology, patron- 
age, and artistic expression within the documen- 
tary mode. Deborah Kao 

FA 296 (HS 249) (RL 294) Italy: Art Literature, 
History (S: 3) 

This is an interdisciplinary course. It will consist 
often two-hour lectures in English, to be followed 
by an optional three-week field-trip to Italy. The 
history and culture of two cities — Florence and 
Rome — will be studied in their general lines with 
emphasis on the period from ancient Rome to the 
Baroque era. Lectures will focus on the social 
context as well as the artistic trends and figures 
associated with the two cities. Rena Lamparska 

L. Scott van Doren 
Josephine von Henneberg 

FA 31 1 Greek Art and Archeology (S: 3) 

The art of the ancient Greeks is the visible testi- 
mony of one of the great ages of man. Drawing 
on mythological tradition for its subjects, and 
exhibiting an ever changing and evolving style, 
Greek art embodies the highest artistic ideals of 
the Western world. This course will present ma- 
jor aspects of Greek art from the Archaic to the 
Hellenistic periods with special emphasis on art 
in Athens in the age of Pericles. Archeological 
material will be covered primarily in relation to 
the major artistic monuments. Kenneth Craig 

FA 314 Art and Archeology of Ancient Egypt 
and the Ancient Near East (F: 3) 

This course will examine two of the world's old- 
est civilizations. The course will concentrate on 
the architecture, sculpture and painting of Egypt 
and of the cultures of Mesopotamia with frequent 
reference to the broader archaeological contexts 
of the material. While we will focus on the physi- 
cal remains of these civilizations, ancient literary 
sources — read in translation — will be employed 
to enrich our understanding of the period. Some 
related problems to be treated in this class: the 
invention of writing; the place of the Hittites; 
international relations in late bronze age. 

Kenneth Craig 

FA 327 (HS 314) Early Medieval Art in Ireland 

(F:3) 

This seminar will examine the origins and devel- 
opment of art in Ireland and Britain in the Early 
Medieval period and the production of Irish and 
English missionaries on the Continent. Empha- 
sis will be placed on manuscripts, sculpture, and 
metal work of the sixth to ninth century, on un- 
derstanding works of art in their historical con- 



52 • Coi I EGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES • FlNE Ak I S 



texts, and on their sources in the Celtic, Germanic 
and .Mediterranean worlds. Nancy Netzer 

FA 332 The Age of Leonardo, Michelangelo and 
Raphael (S: 3) 

The "High Renaissance" was of relatively hrief 
duration, yet it attained a level of creative accom- 
plishment that served as a model for generations 
to come. The works of the leading masters of this 
era will he examined as well as their influence on 
subsequent artists. Josephine von Henneberg 

FA 342 Age of Rembrandt (S: 3) 

The golden age of Baroque painting in Holland 
will be studied against the historical background 
of changing patterns in religious thought, politi- 
cal alliances and patronage. Focus will be on Hals, 
Rembrandt and Yermeer as well as on the devel- 
opment of genre and landscape. Kenneth Craig 

FA 353 Romantic Era (F: 3) 

This course examines the evolution of the empha- 
sis on emotion and imagination in art and texts 
from the mid- 18th century to around 1840. Em- 
phasis is placed on the printed work of William 
Blake and Francisco Goya, in which an interest 
in the irrational is underlined through the ironic 
relationship between image and text. The signifi- 
cance of philosophical and scientific develop- 
ments, and of the changing political climate, 
epitomized by the French Revolution, are consid- 
ered. Also studied are the romantic response to 
nature, as seen in the work of Friedrich and Runge 
in Germany and Turner and Constable in En- 
gland, and the development of Romanticism in 
Prance, notably in the work of Gericault and 
Delacroix. Reva Wolf 

FA 355 From Gauguin to Dali: Late 19th and 
Early 20th Century Art (S: 3) 

From an examination of the diverse reactions of 
Impressionism in the 1880s the course proceeds 
to a discussion of art nouveau, sculptural trends 
around 1900, to the rise of Expressionism in 
France and Germany. The creation of Cubism, 
Italian Futurism, the evolution of abstract art are 
traced, and, finally, the anti-traditional currents 
from Dada to Surrealism are analyzed. 

Jeffery W. Howe 

FA 361 Issues in Contemporary Art (F: 3) 
This course looks at developments in art since 
1960, including pop art, minimalism, conceptual 
art, earthworks, performance and installation art, 
and public art. Among the topics to be discussed 
are: the relationship between art and audience, 
and between art and the art market, artistic iden- 
tity and its relationship to ethnic and sexual iden- 
tity, the significance of the terms "modernism" 
and "post-modernism," and of recent trends in 
literary theory (such as post-structuralism and 
deconstruction). The course includes a bus trip 
to New York City. Reva Wolf 

FA 384 History and Art History into Film 
(F, S: 3) 

I his course will provide an introduction to the 
creation of authentic historical films. We will start 
with an exploration of the kinds of historical and 
art-historical sources that could be inspirational 
tor scripting, and go on to look at the scripting 
process itself. Then students will be introduced 
to script breakdown, location scouting, produc- 
tion design and the making of production boards. 



Each student will undertake a research project 
related to the props, costumes, or architectural 
settings needed for the creation of a specific his- 
torical film. Pamela Berger 

FA 388 Costa-Gavras' Films: Dramatized 
History* (S: 3) 

In his early French films such as Z on the 
Lambrakis assassination, The Confession about the 
Slansky/London mock trial, and State of Siege 
dealing with Latin American guerrilla activity, 
Greek-born Costa-Gavras established himself as 
a director of strong, controversial political con- 
cerns. Although these films were fictional they 
had their basis in crucial historical events. With 
his American-oriented films such as Hanna K, 
Missing, Betrayed and The Music Box, the director 
has continued to raise the consciousness of his 
international audiences by his study of American 
involvement in Latin America, racism, and war 
crimes. This course will trace the evolution of 
each of these films from the actual historical event, 
through the book and script stage, to the final 
dramatic cinematic production. Lab fee: $55.00 

John Michalczyk 

FA 392 The Museum of Art: History, Practice, 
Philosophy (S: 3) 

A study of the emergence of museums of art trac- 
ing their development from private and ecclesi- 
astical collections of the middle ages to their 
present form as public institutions. Topics in- 
clude: the function of the museum in its social 
context, the constituency of museums and their 
educational mission, the role of the university vs. 
the public museum, philosophy of installation and 
care of collections, current problems of adminis- 
tration and financing, museum architecture as a 
reflection of changes in function, the art market, 
and questions of authenticity of works of art. Field 
trips to museums and collections. Nancy Netzer 

FA 401 Seminar in Art Historical Research (F: 3) 

The seminar aims to acquaint the student with the 
bibliography and research methods necessary for 
scholarly work in art history. The student pre- 
pares a substantial research paper under the di- 
rection of the professor and presents it orally to 
the class. Reva Wolf 

FA 403-404 Independent Work (F, S: 3) 

This course may be given from time to time to 
allow students to study a particular topic which is 
not included in the courses that are offered. 

The Department 

FA 458 Andy Warhol (S: 3) 

This course examines Warhol's work in film, 
photography, and painting, and his collaborations 
with musicians, poets, and writers in the context 
of the artistic, intellectual, and political milieu of 
the 1960s. Special attention is given to Warhol's 
and his collaborators' interest in paradox, in word- 
image associations, in blurring the distinctions 
between original and appropriated images, be- 
tween art and life, between "high" and "popular" 
culture. Also considered is the idea of the Factory, 
its precedents in earlier 20th-century art, and the 
roles of its various members. ( Conflicting interpre- 
tations of Warhol's work from 1962 to the present 
are discussed as well. Reva Wolf 



FA 499 Scholar of the College (F, S: 3) 

A&S students who want the challenge of work- 
ing intensively on a scholarly or creative project 
of their own design during their senior year 
should consider applying for this program. Can- 
didates must have at least a 3.3 average; they ap- 
ply through the Department Chairperson, with 
the approval of a faculty supervisor, and are se- 
lected by the dean. They normally take two up- 
per-division electives in each semester of their 
senior year, and have the rest of their time to work 
independently on their projects. Application 
deadline is normally in the late fall of a student's 
junior year. See the Arts and Sciences section of 
this Catalog, or contact the Dean's office for a fall 
description of the requirements. The Department 

Studio Art (including Film and 
Photography) 

NOTE: A laboratory fee is charged in all 
studio courses. 

FS 003-004 Introduction to Ceramics (F: 3 S: 3) 

An introductory course for students desiring a 
foundation knowledge in the possibilities of clay. 
This course will deal with all phases of ceramics 
from slab construction to bowl making and a good 
deal of effort will go into considering a variety of 
sculptural possibilities at a foundation level. This 
course covers the broadest range of ceramic tech- 
niques and information. 

The emphasis in the second semester will be 
on combining the various techniques and con- 
cepts acquired previously into a working order, 
as well as an exposure to additional technical and 
conceptual information. Those students starting 
ceramics in second semester will be given indi- 
vidual assistance in beginning techniques. Lab fee 
per semester: $80.00 Mark Cooper 

FS 100 Visual Thinking (F, S: 3) 

This is a studio art course which encourages en- 
try level and advanced students to grapple with 
questions about the nature of art and the creative 
process. By exploring the relationship between 
seeing, thinking, and making students arrive at a 
fuller, more confident understanding of visual 
language and the nature of the visual world. Al- 
though students explore and problem solve with 
a variety of art materials and processes the course 
requires minimal technical facility. By stressing 
the conceptual aspect of visual thinking the course 
will allay fears ("I can't draw") which block stu- 
dents from considering studio art as a serious 
option. Lab fee: $45.00 The Department 

FS 101 Drawing I: Foundations (F, S: 3) 

The use of line, plane, and volume is explored to 
develop the student's comprehension of pictorial 
space and an understanding of the formal prop- 
erties inherent in picture making. Class work, 
critiques, and discussions will be used to expand 
the student's preconceived ideas about art. This 
course may be taken for Core credit. Lab fee: 
$70.00 Elizabeth Await 

Michael Mulheni 
The Department 
John Steczynski 

FS 102 Painting I: Foundations (F, S: 3) 

This is an introduction to the materials, methods 
and vocabulary of painting. The course uses ob- 
servation and learning "to see" as the cornerstone 



College of Arts & Sciences • Fink Arts • 53 



for painting, but involves abstraction as well as 
representation. The emphasis is on making the 
painting come alive rather than on "copying." 
Students are expected to paint in class as well as 
at home. Critiques, slide lectures and museum 
visits are an integral part of the course. This 
course may be taken for Core credit. 
Lab fee: $70.00 The Department 

Alston Conley 

FS 103 Sculpture I: Foundations (F, S: 3) 

The realization of images in 3 dimensions takes 
many forms, from relief to free-standing object, 
from observation to transformation. This course 
is an introduction to the language and processes 
used in making sculpture. Through demonstra- 
tions, discussions, museum visits and assignments 
the student will be encouraged to develop a broad 
vocabulary and personal vision. This course may 
be taken for Core credit. Lab fee: $70.00 

Michael Mulhern 

FS 1 45 Beginning Ceramics: Introduction to the 
Figure (F: 3) 

An introductory course for students with or with- 
out art experience who want to explore art mak- 
ing that considers the figure as a source. This 
course will use clay as a primary material; but, will 
also explore a variety of other materials, such as 
drawing, painting, plaster and found objects/as- 
semblage. The course will explore a range of at- 
titudes from realistic to abstract. Models will be 
used throughout the semester. Lab fee: $80.00 

Mark Cooper 

FS 161 Photography I (F, S: 3) 

This course is an introduction to black and white 
photography. Topics to be covered include expo- 
sure, film development, printmaking and mount- 
ing for exhibition. Class time will be devoted to 
slide lectures on the work of historical and con- 
temporary photographers, critiques of student 
work, and darkroom demonstrations. Emphasis 
will be placed on helping each student realize a 
personal way of seeing. Students will have weekly 
shooting and printing assignments. Class limited 
to 1 5 students. Lab fee: $90.00 Karl Baden 

Charles Meyer 

FS 171 Film-making I (F, S: 3) 

How observations and visions are turned into 
images. How images are connected to form ideas. 
Projects in silent film-making: shooting, lighting, 
and editing. Film as a form of expression and com- 
munication. A class for beginners. Equipment is 
provided. Lab fee: $80.00 Cindy Kleine 

FS 203 Drawing II: Perspective and Tone (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 101 or permission of the instruc- 
tor 

A skills course which uses the classical aca- 
demic drawing tradition as a discipline to inte- 
grate intellectual analysis, visual accuracy and 
manual control through the free-hand rendering 
of primarily geometric objects. Students are ex- 
pected to master proportion, foreshortening and 
volumetric and spatial representation through 
applied perspective and modeling and shading in 
a variety of media. Lab fee: $65.00 

John Steczynski 



FS 204 Drawing III: Introduction to the Figure 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: FS 203 or permission of the instruc- 
tor 

The course uses a sequence of observation and 
analytical problems focusing on elements and as- 
pects of the human body to lead to working from 
the live model. Expressive and experimental ap- 
proaches are encouraged. Lab fee: $65.00 

John Steczynski 

FS 206 Large Scale and Thematic Drawing (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 101 or permission of the instruc- 
tor 

The miniature to the gigantic; the sketch to 
the "cartoon"; the individual statement to the 
series. The primary emphasis of this course will 
be on the student developing individual direc- 
tions, while investigating the issues of scale and 
theme in drawing. Lab fee: $65.00 

Michael Mulhern 

FS 221 Color (S: 3) 

A course concerned primarily with sensitizing the 
student to understanding, seeing and using color 
with more subtlety and sophistication. The course 
has two components: a technical part dealing pri- 
marily with color mixture and color interaction: 
and an intuitive part, consisting of free color stud- 
ies. Lab fee: $65.00 Elizabeth Await 

FS 223-224 Painting II Painting III (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 101-102 or permission of the in- 
structor 

The course focuses on the acquisition of ba- 
sic painting skills and on the attitudes, awareness, 
and satisfactions that accompany this experience. 
Students will explore still life, figure painting, 
landscape and abstraction. Although class time is 
primarily spent painting, there are frequent dis- 
cussions, critiques and slide presentations of 
paintings. It is suggested that students have some 
familiarity with and interest in painting or draw- 
ing before electing the course. 
Lab fee per semester: $70.00 Andrew Tavarelli 

FS 225-226 Watercolor l-Watercolor II (F: 3-S: 3} 

Students are introduced to the painting materi- 
als and techniques of watercolor. Assignments in 
class are designed to expand the student's visual 
thinking. Class time includes painting from still 
life, the figure and landscape; critiques and slide 
presentations. Previous drawing experience is 
recommended. Lab fee per semester: $65.00 

Andrew Tavarelli 

FS 241-242 Ceramics l-Ceramics II (F: 3-S: 3) 

No prerequisite 

Stress is placed on the basic fundamentals of 
ceramics as a means for self-expression through 
sculptural or functional concerns. The course is 
conducted through informal talks, slide lectures, 
and demonstrations. These include orientation 
and exploration of the possibilities of clay and 
glaze, technical background, history and attitudes 
towards ceramic objects. Students are required to 
spend an appropriate time outside of class on spe- 
cific projects. Lab fee per semester: $80.00 

Mark Cooper 

FS 261 Photography II (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 161 or permission of the instruc- 
tor 



This course is for students with a strong com- 
mitment to photography as a creative discipline. 
The class will emphasize understanding and mas- 
tering the aesthetic and technical relationships 
among light, film, and camera, as well as the de- 
velopment of a personal photographic vision. The 
class will serve as a forum for critiquing work; for 
presenting historical and contemporary move- 
ments in photography and the development of a 
visual literacy; and for demonstrating photo- 
graphic processes and equipment. Students are 
expected to produce work in a series and to 
present a final portfolio. Class limited to 15 stu- 
dents. Lab fee: $90.00 Karl Baden 

Charles Meyer 

FS 267 Experimental Photography (S: 3) 

This will be a one-semester course for those in- 
terested in photography as a personally expressive 
medium. Encouragement will be given to the stu- 
dent artist through non-standard application of 
photographic principles. Topics available for dis- 
cussion include Sabettier effect, high contrast, 
hand-applied color, toning, photogram, multiple 
printing, and reticulation. Significant work out- 
side of class will be expected. Lab fee: $90.00 

Karl Baden 

FS 273 Film-making II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Film-making I or permission of the 
instructor 

This course is designed for students who want 
to make movies. Utilizing state-of-art sound film 
cameras, students develop topics, shoot, and edit 
their own films. Emphasis is on demystifying the 
film-making process. Equipment is provided. 
Class limited to 12 students. Lab fee: $80.00 

Cindy Kleine 

FS 300 Majors' Studio: Juniors and Seniors* (S: 3) 

This is a required course for studio majors (be- 
ginning with the class of 1994). It is designed to 
promote a sense of artistic community through 
the in-depth investigation of art issues and an 
exchange of ideas and points of view. Discussions, 
critical readings, critiques of student work, mu- 
seum and gallery visits, student and faculty slide 
talks will provide the basis of the course. The in- 
structor and students will decide upon the relevant 
issues to be considered. A portfolio of work will 
be developed by the student over the course of the 
semester and will be the basis for grading. 
Lab fee: $70.00 Andrew Tavarelli 

FS 301-302 Drawing IV: Figure-Drawing V: 
Figure (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 204 or permission of the instruc- 
tor 

The course uses the human figure to expand 
the student's abilities in the direction of more 
expressive and more individualized drawing skills. 
In addition to working from the live model in 
class, the first semester includes anatomical stud- 
ies, and the second semester stresses stylistic and 
spatial experimentation, seeing the figure as a 
component within a total composition. Lab fee per 
semester: $70.00 John Steczynski 

FS 323 Painting IV: Landscape (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 223-224 or permission of the in- 
structor 

Nature and landscape will provide us with 
painting imagery throughout the semester. Stu- 



54 • Col 1 K.h 01 ARTS & SCIENCES • GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 



dents will paint directly from the local landscape 
and these paintings will serve as source material 
tor large-scale studio paintings. This class is de- 
signed tor advanced students who are familiar 
with the fundamentals of painting and wish to 
broaden and strengthen diis foundation. Students 
will be encouraged to develop a personal vision 
and are free to work abstractly or repre- 
sentationally. Lab fee: $70.00 Elizabeth Await 

FS 324 Painting V: Figure (S: 3) 
Prerequisite: IS 223-224 or permission of the in- 
structor 

The objective of this advanced painting course 
is to introduce the student to the concept of ex- 
tracting and abstracting images from life; most 
notably from the figure. During the first portion 
of the semester, students will strengthen their 
observational and technical skills by painting di- 
rectly from the model. As the semester advances 
students may incorporate additional figurative 
imagery, called from photographs and media im- 
agery, into their paintings. At the conclusion of 
the semester the figure in the landscape may be 
introduced. It is assumed that students are work- 
ing towards developing a personal vision upon 
entering this class and they will be free to work 
either representationally or abstractly. 
Lab fee: $70.00 Elizabeth Await 



FS 344 Ceramics Ill-Vessels/Wheelthrowing 
(S:3) 

No prerequisite 

Emphasis is placed on the development of 
ideas pertaining to vessels/containers. This cov- 
ers a range of issues from function to metaphor 
which allows for sculptural and painterly adapta- 
tions. Fundamentals of throwing on the potter's 
wheel along with various handbuilding and glaze 
techniques will be demonstrated throughout the 
semester. During the second semester specific 
projects are given which assist the student in de- 
veloping throwing skills at an advanced level and/ 
or assist in the further development of other con- 
tainer ideas. Lab fee: $80.00 Mark Cooper 

FS 345, 346, 347, 348 Advanced Ceramics II, 
III, IV, V (F, S: 3) 

This is a ceramics course established to assist the 
individual in his or her aesthetic pursuits. The 
student may arrange class times on Wednesdays. 
Instruction will be given on an individual level 
appropriate to the student's previous ceramic ex- 
perience. The student will be given a private space 
within the ceramic area. Along with developing 
an aesthetic, the student will be assisted in un- 
derstanding and creating clays and glazes as well 
as kiln firing and construction. 
Lab fee per semester: $80.00 Mark Cooper 



FS 378 Art As Symbol I: The Great Mother, The 
Hero, and Death (F: 3) 

A study of archetypes, symbols and polarities, 
especially as related to gender studies and life/ 
death issues, in the themes, forms and processes 
of art. Lectures, discussions, projects. 

John Steczynski 

FS 385-386 Independent Work (F: 3-S: 3) 

A course allowing students who have sufficient 
background to progress to a higher level or in a 
more specialized area than other courses allow. 
The student works independently, under the di- 
rection of a member of the Department. Depart- 
ment permission required. The Department 

FS 485-486 Independent Work (F: 3-S: 3) 

A course allowing students who have sufficient 
background to progress to a higher level or in a 
more specialized area than other courses allow. 
The student works independently, under the di- 
rection of a member of the Department. 
Department permission required. The Department 

FS 498 Senior Project (F: 3) 

Required of all Studio Art majors. Students must 
have taken at least 4 semesters of work relating 
to their project prior to the Senior year. Directed 
by a member of the Department and evaluated by 
departmental review. Andrew Tavarelli 



Geology and Geophysics 



FACULTY 

Emanuel G. Bombolakis, Professor; B.S., M.S., 
Colorado School of Alines; Ph.D., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology 

George D. Brown, Jr., Professoi-; B.S., Saint 
Joseph's College; M.S., University of Illinois; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

J. Christopher Hepburn, Professor; A.B., 
Colgate University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity 

James W. Skehan, S.J., Professor, Director, 
Weston Observatory; A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Benno M. Brenninkmeyer, S.J., Associate Pro- 
fessor; A.B., Boston College; Ph.D., University 
of Southern California 

John E. Ebel, Associate Professor; A.B., I larvard 
University; Ph.D., California Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Rudolph Hon, Associate Professor; M.Sc, 
Charles University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology 

David C. Roy Asroi (ate Professor, Chairperson of 

the Department; B.S., Iowa State University; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Alan L. Kafka, Associate Professor; B.A., N'ew 
York University; M.S., Ph.D., State University 
of New York at Stony Brook 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Major in Geology or Geophysics 

An undergraduate in the Department of Geology 
and Geophysics may develop a major program 
with an emphasis in Geology, Geophysics, a com- 
bination of Geology and Geophysics, or the En- 
vironmental Geosciences. Within the broadly 
defined constraints discussed below, programs can 
be individually designed to meet the interests and 
objectives of each student. It is recognized that 
students may wish to major or have a concentra- 
tion in the earth sciences for a variety of reasons 
including: 

1. a desire to work professionally in one of the 
earth sciences, 

2. a desire to major in the Geosciences as part 
of a liberal arts education, 

3. a desire to obtain an earth science founda- 
tion preparatory to post-graduate work in envi- 
ronmental studies, resource management, envi- 
ronmental law, or other similar fields where such 
a background would be useful, 

4. a desire to teach earth science in secondary 
schools, or 

5. a general interest in the earth sciences. 

Broadly speaking, earth scientists seek by in- 
vestigation to understand the complicated dynam- 
ics and materials that characterize the earth. For 
some, the emphasis is on the composition, struc- 
ture and history of the earth; for others, investi- 
gations are aimed at understanding geologic pro- 
cesses and the modifications of materials they 
produce. 



Recently environmental concerns about pol- 
lution and shortages of energy, clean water, and 
other natural resources have introduced exciting 
new fields of investigation to the science. The 
earth scientist of today has the choice of working 
outdoors in the field or in ultra-modern com- 
puter-equipped laboratories. The number and 
complexity of problems addressed by geologists 
and geophysicists and geo-environmentalists will 
only increase in the future; thus, students choos- 
ing to work in these areas can look forward to 
exciting and financially rewarding careers. 

Any major in Geology and/or Geophysics may 
elect to enroll in the Department Honors Pro- 
gram, provided a satisfactory scholastic average 
has been maintained (3.3 in the major, 3.2 over- 
all). Application to the program should be made 
in the spring of the junior year. Each applicant 
must have a faculty advisor to supervise the pro- 
posed research project. Honors will be awarded 
upon: a) successful completion of a thesis based 
upon the proposed research project as evaluated 
by the faculty advisor; b) approval by the Under- 
graduate Program Committee of the thesis and 
the candidate's academic record. 

Students in the Department are urged to ful- 
fill at least one of the elective courses with a 
project-oriented research course during their se- 
nior year. 

Students may propose substitutes for particu- 
lar course requirements by petitioning, in writ- 
ing, the Department Undergraduate Policy Com- 
mittee. 



College of Arts & Sciences • Geology and Geophysics 



55 



Environmental Geoscience Major 

This program serves as an excellent major both 
for students who wish to concentrate in the envi- 
ronmental sciences and for those who may use 
their environmental studies in the general context 
of a Liberal Arts program or as preparation for 
careers in law, resource management, or other 
similar post-graduate education programs. Stu- 
dents concentrating in Environmental Geo- 
sciences should work out their programs closely 
with a Departmental advisor to ensure both 
breadth and depth in this subject area. Students 
must complete the following course require- 
ments: 1) A total of 10 courses in the Department 
of Geology and Geophysics, no more than four 
of which may be at the 100 level, (a) These courses 
must include Introduction to Geology and Geo- 
physics I with the laboratory (GE 132-133) and 
Environmental Geology (GE 250). Planet Earth 
I (GE 115), Introduction to Earth Science (GE 
180) and The Dynamic Earth (GE 197) plus the 
Introduction to Geology I Laboratory (GE 133) 
may substitute for GE 1 32-1 33. (b) Three courses 
from among the following: Introduction to Ge- 
ology and Geophysics II (GE 134); Geologic 
Hazards, Landslides and Earthquakes (GE 143) 
or Geophysical Hazards (GE 145); Oceanography 
I and II (GE 157 and 160); Meteorology (GE 
170); Mineralogy (GE 200); Structural Geology 
I (GE 285); Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (GE 
264); Petrology I (GE 270). (c) At least one course 
from among the following: Geochemistry (GE 
302); Modern and Ancient Sedimentary Environ- 
ments (GE 460); Hydrology (GE 395); Chemis- 
try of Natural Water Systems (GE 484); Intern- 
ship and Seminar in Environmental Geoscience 
(GE 510); Marine Geology (GE 530); Coastal 
Geology (GE 539). (d) Four elective courses in the 
Department to be chosen by the student in con- 
sultation with his or her advisor. 2) A year of an- 
other science (Chemistry, Physics, or Biology) 
with laboratory is required. Students are encour- 
aged to take additional courses in Mathematics 
(Calculus), Chemistry, Physics, and Biology. Up 
to two courses taken in these subjects in addition 
to those required in (2) above may be substituted 
for electives in the Department ("d" above). Stu- 
dents are also advised that other courses in the 
University pertinent to the Environmental Geo- 
sciences major may be substituted for the above 
requirements upon petition to and approval by the 
Departmental Undergraduate Policy Committee. 

Geology Major 

Students majoring in Geology will take the fol- 
lowing courses: Introduction to Geology and 
Geophysics I and II (GE 132, 134), Mineralogy 
(GE 200), Structural Geology I and II (GE 285, 
385), Petrology I and II (GE 270, 272), Stratig- 
raphy and Sedimentation (GE 264) and at least 
two additional electives (with a minimum of one 
being numbered 300 or above) in the Department 
to bring the total number of Departmental 
courses to 10. Also required are two semesters of 
Calculus MT 102 and MT 103 or their equiva- 
lent (e.g. MT 100-101 and MT 200), two semes- 
ters of Physics using Calculus (PH 209-2 10 or PH 
211-212) and two semesters of Chemistry with 
laboratory (CH 109-110). The Department 
strongly advises that Mathematics MT 204 and 
MT 305 be taken, and a geology summer field 



course is recommended for anyone planning a 
professional career in geology. Credit for a sum- 
mer field course may be used to satisfy one of the 
300 level Departmental electives upon written 
approval of the Chairperson prior to taking the 
field course. Elective courses both within and 
outside the Department will be determined by the 
student and his or her advisor. 

Geophysics Major 

Students majoring in Geophysics will fulfill the 
following course requirements: Introduction to 
Geology and Geophysics I and II (GE 132,1 34), 
Structural Geology II (GE 385), Introduction to 
Geophysics (GE 391), plus three other courses in 
geophysics, two additional Departmental electives 
numbered 200 or above, and two additional elec- 
tives approved in advance by the student's advi- 
sor in Departmental courses numbered 400 or 
above or in advanced courses in Physics or Math- 
ematics beyond those required below (combina- 
tions of courses such as one advanced Departmen- 
tal course and one advanced Physics course can 
be used). Thus, 1 1 courses are required in addi- 
tion to the outside science requirements. These 
outside science requirements for the Geophysics 
major are: one year of Chemistry with laboratory 
(CH 109-1 10); Calculus through MT 305 or MT 
303; four semesters of Physics, to include at least 
two semesters of Physics from among: PH 401, 
PH 402, PH 425, PH 441, following the two se- 
mesters of Introduction to Physics with Calculus 
(PH 209-2 10 or PH 2 1 1-212). Courses in com- 
puter science and additional electives in geology 
are recommended. Elective courses both within 
and outside the Department will be determined 
by the student and his or her advisor. 

Geology-Geophysics Major 

This major may be desirable for those seeking the 
advantages of both programs, and it is considered 
excellent preparation for those looking toward 
employment in industry following graduation 
with a B.S. degree. However, students are cau- 
tioned that this combined program is more inten- 
sive than either of the separate majors in Geol- 
ogy or Geophysics. 

Students majoring in Geology-Geophysics 
will take the following courses: Introduction to 
Geology and Geophysics I and II (GE 132,1 34), 
Mineralogy (GE 200), Structural Geology I and 
II (GE 285, 385), Petrology I and II (GE 270, 
272), one course in sedimentary geology, and at 
least three courses in Geophysics. Also required 
are two semesters of Chemistry with laboratory 
(CH 109-1 10), Calculus through MT 305 or MT 
303, and three semesters of Physics to include at 
least one semester of Physics from among PH 
401, PH 402, PH 425, or PH 441, following the 
two semesters of Introduction to Physics with 
Calculus (PH 209-210 or 211-212). Courses in 
computer science and a summer geology field 
course are highly recommended. The student will 
plan an elective program in consultation with his 
or her advisor. 

Weston Observatory 

Director: James W. Skehan, S.J., Professor of 
Geology 

Weston Observatory, formerly Weston College 
Seismic Station (1928-1949), is a part of the De- 
partment of Geology and Geophysics of Boston 



College. The Observatory, located 10 miles from 
Chestnut Hill, is an interdisciplinary research fa- 
cility in the fields of geophysics, geology, energy 
and environmental sciences. Research by faculty, 
research associates, and students is directed pri- 
marily to seismology, geomagnetism and crustal 
analysis. Weston Observatory was one of the first 
participating facilities in the Worldwide Stan- 
dardized Seismograph network and also operates 
a thirty-station regional seismic network which 
records data from earthquakes in the northeast as 
well as from distant earthquakes. The Observa- 
tory is also the headquarters of the New England 
Seismotectonic Study, a cooperative effort to de- 
termine the distribution and causes of New En- 
gland seismicity. A geomagnetic research facility, 
established at the Observatory in 1958, is instru- 
mented for absolute magnetic observations, the 
continuous recording of variations in the compo- 
nents of the earth's magnetic field, and a magnetic 
field cancelling coil system for experiments re- 
quiring reduction of the ambient magnetic field. 
Regional geologic and plate tectonic modeling 
studies are chiefly concerned with the origin and 
evolution of the Northern Appalachian Moun- 
tains of the United States and Maritime Canada 
and their relation to similar rock sequences in 
Ireland, the British Isles, western Europe and 
Africa. 

Core Program 

The Core course offerings in the Department 
reflect the view that Earth is the only long-term 
home that humans will ever have. The uniqueness 
of this planet as our habitat requires that we con- 
sider the implications of our actions to our envi- 
ronment, whether they be the discharge of pol- 
lutants, the use of petroleum and other natural 
resources, or the uses to which we devote the land. 
The physical, chemical and biological factors of 
our planetary home are complex and affect all of 
us, some in a direct and immediate fashion; oth- 
ers in indirect and more long-term ways. The 
courses we offer include a variety of subjects. The 
variety of courses provides considerable choice 
and all presume no prior knowledge of the earth 
sciences. 

The following courses are intended to fulfill 
the Natural Science Core requirement and have 
no prerequisites. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

An asterisk (*) after a course title indicates that a 
course carries a laboratory fee. 

Core Courses 

GE 115 Planet Earth I (F: 3) 

An introduction to the concepts and processes of 
our only home and its environment, planet Earth. 
In addition to lectures, simulated ficldtrips will be 
used in an Audio-Tutorial format to enable the 
student to experience the physical aspects of ge- 
ology. One two-hour A-T session (GE 1 16) and 
two one-hour lectures per week. 

E. G. Bombolnkis 

GE 1 16 Planet Earth AT* (F: 0) 

One simulated geological "field trip" session is 
planned each week using an individualized audio- 
tutorial format (slides and tapes) in connection 
with GE 115. Lab fee: $5 5 .00 E. G. Bombolakis 



56 • College of Arts & Sciences • Geology and Geophysics 



GE 125 Planet Earth II (S: 3) 

A sequel to GE 1 15, this course will explore the 
development of planet Earth, with special atten- 
tion to North America and the United States, and 
the history of evolutionary development of life 
forms that have inhabited its surface through time. 
One two-hour Audio-Tutorial laboratory exercise 
and two one-hour lectures per week. GE 1 15 is 
not a prerequisite for this course. 

Geoige D. Brown, Jr. 

GE 1 26 Planet Earth A-T II* (S: 0) 

The required Audio-Tutorial session for GE 125. 
Lab fee: S55.00 George D. Brown, Jr. 

GE 1 32 Introduction to Geology and 
Geophysics I (F: 3) 

An introduction to the important geological pro- 
cesses operating on and within the earth. Intended 
for Geology, Geophysics, and Environmental 
Geoscience majors, majors in other sciences, and 
students wishing a more advanced Core course. 
Laboratory (GE 133) is required for Geology, 
Geophysics and Environmental Geoscience ma- 
jors, but is optional for non-majors. David C. Roy 

GE 1 34 Introduction to Geology and 
Geophysics II (S: 3) 

A continuation of GE 132 with an emphasis on 
geophysical aspects of the earth: seismology, ra- 
dioactive dating, magnetism, and gravity. May be 
taken without GE 132 with permission of instruc- 
tor. Fulfills Core science requirement. Laboratory 
(GE 1 35) is required for Geology, Geophysics and 
Environmental Geoscience majors. John E. Ebel 

GE 1 33-1 35 Introduction to Geology and 
Geophysics Laboratory* (F: 1-S: 1) 

Laboratory required for Geology, Geophysics 
and Environmental Geoscience majors and open 
to other interested students enrolled in GE 132- 
134. 

One two-hour laboratory per week and field 
trips. Lab fee per semester: $130.00 John E. Ebel 

David C. Roy 

GE 143 Geologic Hazards, Landslides, and 
Earthquakes (S: 3) 

The origin of common types of earth material and 
several landform features will be reviewed during 
the first few weeks. The purpose of this review is 
to prepare the way for the analysis of ancient, 
modern, and future geologic disasters. The analy- 
sis will deal with the type of catastrophe that elimi- 
nated the entire city of Helice, Greece, in 373 
B.C.; more recent disasters such as the Vaient dam 
disaster and the Alaskan earthquake; and the pre- 
diction of earthquakes in California and the east- 
ern United States. E.G. Bombolakis 

GE 1 50 Introduction to Astronomy (F: 4) 

The solar system with emphasis on the planets. 
I listory of our understanding of the system and 
the rapid increase of knowledge from artificial 
satellites. Weekly two-hour laboratory/discus- 
sions (GE 151) and two 75-minute lectures per 
week. Telescopic observations of sunspots during 
the day in addition to measurements of the bright- 
ness of a variable star and views of current astro- 
nomical phenomena at night. Edward M. Brooks 

GE 151 Introduction to Astronomy Laboratory/ 
Discussion Group* (F: 0) 

The required lab/discussion group for GE 150. 
Lab fee: $5 5 .00 Edward M. Brooks 



GE 157-160 Oceanography I and II (F: 4-S: 4) 

A non-mathematical discovery of the environ- 
ments of the world's oceans and coast lines. 

Topics examined include a history of the 
growth of ocean basins, a description of the land- 
forms and sediments found on the ocean bottom, 
the characteristics of ocean water, the movement 
of the water by waves, tides and currents. The 
second semester emphasizes the evolution, ecol- 
ogy and physical processes of beaches, coral reefs, 
estuaries, and deltas-areas where the ocean meets 
land, as well as the animals and plants that live in 
both the deep and shallow waters as well as at the 
water's edge. Man's effect upon and benefits from 
each of these environments and ecological niches 
is stressed. 

Two one-hour lectures per week. One one- 
and-a-half-hour laboratory (GE 158 and GE 161) 
and one optional demonstration, film and/or dis- 
cussion each week. A field trip in the second se- 
mester. Second semester can be taken without the 
first semester. Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

GE 158-161 Oceanography I and II 
Laboratory* (F: 0-S: 0) 

The required lab for GE 157-160. Lab fee per se- 
mester: $60.00 Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

GE 167 Geology and the Environment (F: 3) 

This lecture course is a survey of the geologic 
aspects of our environment. Topics include: natu- 
ral resources (water, soils, fossil fuels, and min- 
eral deposits), river and coastal processes that in- 
teract with human culture and the geologic as- 
pects of toxic and nuclear waste disposal. 

The Department 

GE 1 70 Introduction to Meteorology (S: 4) 

The structure and controls of the atmosphere's 
vertical motion and world-wind systems. Special 
topics for long-range forecasting, temperature 
effects of variable solar radiation and volcanic 
aerosols in the stratosphere, along with terrestrial 
radiation, including the greenhouse effect. Each 
student prepares one analog forecast for the next 
day's weather in Boston. Two 75-minute lectures 
and one laboratory/discussion (GE 171) per week. 

Edward M. Brooks 

GE 1 71 Meteorology Laboratory/Discussion* (S: 0) 

Lab fee: $5 5 .00 Edward M. Brooks 

GE 1 77 Cosmos (S: 3) 

Man is in the process of exploring the Solar Sys- 
tem and beyond. The spectacular results of recent 
manned and unmanned space programs, includ- 
ing Apollo (moon), Viking (Mars), Pioneer and 
Voyageur (Mercury, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, Ura- 
nus, Neptune) will be reviewed to help develop 
models for the geologic evolution of these bod- 
ies and a current picture for the origin of the So- 
lar System. The question of the possibility of life 
on other planets, particularly Mars, will be dis- 
cussed. Throughout the course, the fundamentals 
of how science works will be emphasized. Lec- 
tures will be supplemented by various films, slides 
and selected portions of video tape from the "Cos- 
mos" series. Two and one-half hours of lecture 
per week. J. Christopher Hepburn 

GE 180-182 Introduction to Earth Science I and 
II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is designed to introduce the non-sci- 
ence student to a variety of topics in the geo- 



sciences. The nature of scientific inquiry is exam- 
ined, with emphasis on ancient processes that 
formed the oceans and continents, on present-day 
processes that cause earthquakes and volcanoes, 
and on how the earth compares with other plan- 
ets in the solar system. Topics include: the age of 
the earth, minerals, rocks, properties of the earth's 
interior, geologic processes, earthquakes, volca- 
noes, plate tectonics, and the solar system. Two 
one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
session (GE 181 and GE 183) per week. Second 
semester may be taken without the first semester. 

Alan Kafka 

GE 181-183 Introduction to Earth Science I and 
II Laboratory* (F: 0-S: 0) 

Lab fee per semester: $55.00 Alan Kafka 

GE 190 Origins of Man (S: 3) 

This course is an introduction to the study of man 
as a product of the biological and geological 
world. It is intended primarily for non-scientists 
but provides ample technical background for fur- 
ther scientific studies. It will consider various ori- 
gins, the universe, the solar system, and earth, to 
establish the natural principles that govern organ- 
isms. It will examine the work of Darwin and 
Mendel, the origin and evolution of life, and the 
paleontological record to establish man's place in 
nature. The course will emphasize the primates 
from their Mesozoic origin through the homi- 
noids and hominids. The fossil evidence for the 
immediate ancestors of modern man, the Austra- 
lopithecines and species of Homo will be consid- 
ered in detail. Recent advances in science that 
establish the relationship between living Great 
Apes and man will also be presented. 

George D. Brown, Jr. 

GE 1 97 The Dynamic Earth (F: 3) 

The focus of this lecture course is the dynamism 
of the earth as reflected in the "drifting" of con- 
tinents, the opening of ocean basins, the devasta- 
tion caused by earthquakes, the eruption of vol- 
canoes, and the formation of mountain ranges. 
The evidence for the movements of continents 
and the opening of ocean basins will be examined 
with the non-science student in mind. 

David C. Roy 

Major Courses 

The following courses are designed for majors in 
the Department or majors in other sciences. Some 
courses have prerequisites, others do not. All how- 
ever, may be taken by students who seek elective 
credit. 

GE 200 Mineralogy (F: 4) 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134, first year of Chemis- 
try, may be taken concurrently. 

Introduction to crystallography, structure and 
crystal chemistry of selected important minerals 
and the rock-forming silicates. Three lectures and 
two hours of laboratory (GE 201) per week. 

Rudolph Hon 

GE 201 Mineralogy Laboratory* (F: 0) 

Lab fee: $55.00 Rudolph Hon 

GE 264 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (F: 4) 

Prerequisites: GE 132 and 134, or equivalent 

The sedimentary rock strata of the earth's 
crust will be studied in a systematic manner to 
develop principles and processes of origin and 
deposition. Lithostratigraphic and biostrati- 



College of Arts & Sciences • Geology and Geophysics • 57 



graphic concepts will be considered along with 
time, time-rock, and rock classifications to per- 
mit correlation of rock units. Selected examples 
from the past will be examined for these and for 
paleoecological and paleoenvironmental interpre- 
tations. A two-hour per week laboratory (GE 265) 
is required. George D. Brown 

GE 265 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation 
Laboratory* (F: 0) 

Lab fee: $55.00 George D. Brown 

GE 270 Petrology I (F: 4) 

Prerequisites: First year of Chemistry, GE 132, 200 
or equivalent 

This course has two parts: the principles and 
theory of polarizing microscopy, and basic igne- 
ous petrology. The first part of the course focuses 
on the basic physics of the interaction of light with 
the crystalline matter and how it can be applied 
to mineral identification using the polarizing 
microscope. The second part of the course cov- 
ers the basic principles of igneous petrology, equi- 
librium and non-equilibrium crystallization and 
the use of phase diagrams in igneous systems. 
Three hours of lecture per week. Laboratory GE 
271 is required. J. Christopher Hepburn 

Rudolph Hon 

GE 271 Petrology I Laboratory* (F: 0) 

The laboratory exercises are directly synchro- 
nized with GE 270. The student will practice the 
use of the polarizing microscope and will learn 
how to use it as a tool for identification of rock- 
forming minerals, using the immersion technique 
as well as the thin section. The petrology and clas- 
sification of the igneous rocks is learned using 
both hand samples and thin sections. Laboratory 
unknowns and problems assigned. Four hours per 
week. Lab fee: $130.00 J. Christopher Hepburn 

Rudolph Hon 

GE 272 Petrology II (S: 4) 

Prerequisite: GE 270 or equivalent 

A continuation of GE 270. This course is de- 
voted to an understanding of the petrology of 
sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. During the 
first half of the course the dynamic and geochemi- 
cal factors involved in the formation of sedimen- 
tary rocks will be explored. The second part of the 
course is devoted to the study of metamorphism, 
including the variables and controls involved in 
the formation of metamorphic rocks. Phase dia- 
grams will be used extensively and applications of 
the phase rule studied. Laboratory GE 273 is re- 
quired. J. Christopher Hepburn 

Rudolph Hon 

GE 273 Petrology II Laboratory* (S: 0) 

Laboratory for GE 272. The petrology of sedi- 
mentary and metamorphic rocks will be examined 
both in hand sample and in thin section, utilizing 
the polarizing microscope. Four hours of labora- 
tory per week with problem sets and unknowns 
assigned. Lab fee: $130,007. Christopher Hepburn 

Rudolph Hon 

GE 285 Structural Geology I: Field Aspects (F: 4) 

This course is an introduction to the analysis of 
structures produced by deformation of the earth's 
crust utilizing concepts of stress and strain. Two 
50-minute lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
(GE 286) per week will be complemented by six 
weekend day sessions in the field. Laboratory ex- 



ercises will emphasize geometrical and physical 
aspects of geologic structures. The field exercises 
will be an introduction to geological mapping. 

James W. Skehan, S.J. 

GE 286 Structural Geology I Laboratory* (F: 0) 

Lab fee: $105.00 James IV. Skehan, S.J. 

GE 350 Regional Geology of North America (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 132-134, 264 or equivalent 

A systematic investigation of the physiogra- 
phy, stratigraphy, structural geology, petrology, 
and distribution of the major geological provinces 
of North America. George D. Brown, Jr. 

GE 385 Structural Geology II: Analytical 
Aspects (S: 4) 

Prerequisites: GE 132 and 134 or equivalent, one 
year of college calculus, PH 2 1 1 or equivalent. 

A history of the development of structural ge- 
ology will be presented during the first several lec- 
tures. Then quantitative mechanisms of fracture, 
faulting, and igneous intrusions will be treated, 
illustrating their relation to problems in tecton- 
ics. To achieve this objective, an analysis will be 
made of stress, and the elastic, brittle, ductile, and 
creep behavior of rocks. The problem of rock 
folding will be treated in terms of folding pro- 
cesses and retrodeformation methods, utilizing 
the concepts of balanced cross-sections. 
One additional two-hour problem session labo- 
ratory (GE 386) per week is required. 

E.G. Bombolakis 
R.J. Martin III 

GE 386 Structural Geology II Laboratory* (S: 0) 

Lab fee: $ 1 05 .00 E. G. Bombolakis 

R.J. Martin III 

GE 391 Introduction to Geophysics (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134; MT 200-201; PH 
211-212 

An introduction to the methods of observa- 
tion and interpretation of geophysical phenom- 
ena. Topics include: seismology, gravity and mag- 
netic fields, age determinations, heat flow, and 
tectonic forces. John F. Devane, S.J. 

GE 395 Ground Water Hydrology I (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 134, 200, CH 110, MT 101 or 
103; or equivalents. 

An overview of ground-water hydrology with 
emphasis on concepts and principles, and their 
application to practical problem solving. The 
course is intended to provide a foundation for 
further in-depth water resources studies, and an 
orientation for active professionals wishing to 
broaden their working knowledge and under- 
standing of ground-water hydrology. Three hours 
of lecture per week. Michael H. Frimpter 

GE 450-452 Exploration Geophysics I and II 

(F: 4-S: 4) 

Prerequisites: GE 132, MT 200-201 or MT 204, 
PH 211-212 

A practical course in geophysical exploration 
methods; emphasis is on applications to petro- 
leum and mineral exploration and geoengineering 
work. Part I covers seismic refraction and reflec- 
tion methods and emphasizes modern techniques 
and applications. Part II covers gravity, magnetic, 
and electrical methods and their theory, instru- 
mentation, data reduction, and interpretation. 

Second semester may be taken without first 
semester by permission of instructor. Three hours 



of lecture and one problem/discussion session per 
week. John E. Ebel 

John F. Devane, S.J. 

GE 484 Chemistry of Natural Water Systems 
(S:3) 

Prerequisites: College level of introductory chem- 
istry and calculus. 

Natural water systems consist of surface and 
subsurface water reservoirs which are in a constant 
process of chemical interaction with their sur- 
roundings. Understanding of these processes (i.e., 
dissolution and precipitation) of various chemi- 
cal species will be presented from the standpoint 
of equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermody- 
namics of water-rock systems. Rudolph Hon 

GE 500 Potential Field Theory (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: MT 202; PH 2 1 1-2 12 

This course is an introduction to the math- 
ematics of potential fields which is used to de- 
scribe such geophysical phenomena as the earth's 
gravitational and magnetic fields. The vector 
theorems of Gauss, Stokes and Green are pre- 
sented, and potential methods of solving Laplace, 
Poisson, diffusion and wave equations under ap- 
propriate geophysical conditions are presented. 
Applications of these theories are made to prac- 
tical problems in geophysics. John E. Ebel 

GE 510 Internship and Seminar in 
Environmental Geosciences (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

This seminar is provided for qualified upper- 
division undergraduates and graduate students 
serving as interns in industry, in government, or 
in non-profit organizations during the semester 
or the previous summer. The subject of the 
project and the activities of the internship must 
be approved in advance by the instructor prior to 
enrollment and a final report or other suitable 
documentation of the results of the internship will 
be due at the end of the semester. Students will 
meet, at least every other week, with the instruc- 
tor and other interns to report on the nature and 
progress of their intern activities. Internships will 
be sought by the Department but suitable intern- 
ships obtained by students may be submitted to 
the instructor for approval. In some semesters the 
seminar may involve a group project on some en- 
vironmental topic suggested by an outside orga- 
nization or developed by the instructor. Since 
technical skills are required, enrollment is by in- 
structor approval only. Charles M. Spooner 

GE 530 Marine Geology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134, 272 

Recent geological, geophysical and geochemi- 
cal information on the ocean basins is examined. 
Emphases are placed on modern sedimentation 
and deformation dynamics, and ocean basin his- 
tory revealed by cored and dredged sediments and 
igneous rocks, together with seismologic, gravity, 
heatflow, and magnetic data. 

Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

GE 543 Plate Tectonics and Mountain Belts (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 285 and GE 272 

The idea that the surface of the earth is not 
fixed but moves in response to convection cur- 
rents in the asthenosphere has revolutionized 
geology. While a great deal is known about Plate 
Tectonics, the full implications of this theory are 
subject to much current research and debate that 



58 



College of Arts & Sciences • Geology and Geophysics 



will certainly continue to be a focus of geological 
thought well into the future. Since most students 
have a general understanding of Plate Tectonic 
theory, hut few have a sufficient working knowl- 
edge of its ramifications, this course will explore 
Plate Tectonics and its geo-tectonic implications 
in detail. A particular emphasis will be on the use 
of Plate Tectonic processes in the interpretation 
of the origin of mountain belts and other large- 
scale geological structures. Both modern and an- 
cient examples will be discussed as will current 
ideas for the analysis of exotic terrains. 

J. Christopher Hepburn 

GE 572 Geophysical Data Processing (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: GE 391, Computer Programming 

The techniques of convolution, correlation 
and spectral analysis are applied to seismic, mag- 
netic and gravity data, with emphasis on the 
theory and construction of two-dimensional fil- 
ters in the interpretation of geophysical data. 

Alan L. Kafka 

GE 595 Ground Water Hydrology II (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: GE 395 

The course covers the following topics: 1) 
theory of groundwater flow, aquifer properties 
and definitions; Darcy's law, definitions of total, 
elevation, and pressure heads, steady and unsteady 
one-directional and two-dimensional flow; 2) well 
and aquifer relationships; flow to wells, discharges 
and drawdown relationships, well efficiency, etc.; 
3) analysis of discharging well and other test data; 
steady state and transient equations, type curve 
solutions, recovery analysis, leaky aquifer solu- 
tions, etc.; and 4) methods of determining aqui- 
fer characteristics. Alfredo Urzua 

GE 596 Reading and Research in Environmental 
Geology (F: 3-S: 3) 

Independent research of an environmental prob- 
lem under the direction of a faculty member. The 
possibility exists to work with actual problems in 
Massachusetts using data from state agencies. 
This course number is to be used for undergradu- 
ate students doing honors theses in Environmen- 
tal geosciences. The Department 

GE 597 Reading and Research in Geology 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Independent research of a geological problem 
under the direction of a faculty member. This 
course number is to be used for undergraduate 
students doing honors theses in geology. 

The Department 

GE 598 Reading and Research in Geophysics 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Independent research of a geophysical problem 
under the direction of a faculty member. This 
course number is to be used for undergraduate 
students doing honors theses in geophysics. 

The Department 

GE 599 Scholar of the College (F: 3-6; S: 3-6) 

Independent research in Geology, Geophysics or 
the Environmental Geosciences under the direc- 
tion of a faculty member for students qualifying 
for University honors. The Department 

GE 635 Ground Water Modelling (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Knowledge of 2nd-year Calculus, 
Introductory Physics, Port ran (or any other coin 
puter language), and some experience with an 
IBM personal computer. 



Some of the topics covered in this lecture 
course are: a review of the fundamental principles 
of ground water flow; finite difference method as 
applied to steady state and transient flow prob- 
lems; and introduction to the finite element 
method as applied to steady state and transient 
flow problems. Alfredo Urzua 

GE 660 Introduction to Seismology (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 1 34 or equivalent, MT 200-201 
or MT 204 (may be taken concurrently) 

A basic course in seismology, including seis- 
mograph calibration, ray theory, body and surface 
waves, location, magnitude and intensity. Also 
discussed are seismicity, energy release, focal 
mechanisms, and fault-plane solutions. 

Alan L. Kafka 

GE 668 Inverse Theory in Geophysics (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 305, programming experience in 
FORTRAN or C 

The theory of the linear and non-linear inver- 
sion of data for model parameters and its appli- 
cation to various problems in geophysics is pre- 
sented. Theories such as the generalized inverse, 
the stochastic inverse, and the maximum likeli- 
hood inverse are developed. The theory and prac- 
tical application of non-linear inversion is dis- 
cussed. Examples from seismology, gravity, mag- 
netism, and geology are used. The relevant math- 
ematics basis from linear algebra and statistics is 
reviewed. John E. Ebel 

GE 680 Geotectonics (F: 3) 

This is a combined lecture and laboratory course 
dealing with structural and tectonic features re- 
sulting from the interaction of plate motion and 
the development of mountain belts. The struc- 
tural and tectonic features will include several of 
prime interest in the oil industry, such as fault- 
propagation folds and faults. Several problems 
associated with their development will be defined 
with analytical solutions requiring field data from 
the literature and experimental data from the 
laboratory. The purpose of the laboratory is for 
students to conduct critical experiments with re- 
spect to appropriate problems, with the objective 
of preparing a group paper for publication. The 
sequence of authors of this paper will be deter- 
mined by the relative contributions of the partici- 
pants. E.G. Bombolakis 

R.J. Martin III 

GE 792 Applications of the Geographical 
Information System (ARC/INFO) (S: 3) 

Geographical Information System (GIS) is an 
integrated software environment that has two 
parts: information handling (data management) 
for both information organization and retrieval, 
and a second part that allows visual display of data 
in a graphical form on a map (geographical coor- 
dinate system). This course is designed to give 
students a working knowledge and a practical 
experience in applying computers in their stud- 
ies and/or research; there are no prerequisites. 

An introduction and overview of a Geographic 
Information System (GIS) along with extensive 
practical experience will be the primary focus of 
this course. The subjects covered will include 
practical aspects of data management within the 
relational database environment as well as a 
hands-on tutorial using practical day-to-day ex- 
amples. Special significance will be given to ap- 



plication of GIS to geological and geophysical 
studies with particular emphasis on data integra- 
tion, spatial RDBMS, and powerful graphics out- 
put capabilities of GIS. ARC/INEO is particularly 
designed to handle data and information related 
to mapping (geological and geophysical maps, 
land use, and even marketing). Many of the as- 
signments will use maps. Complementing the 
introduction and overview will be in-depth train- 
ing using graphics, workstations, and terminals. 

Michael Terner 

GE 793 Seminar in Environmental Geoscience: 
The Geotechnical Bases for Governmental 
Policies and Regulations (S: 3) 

Through guest lecturers, expert in their regula- 
tory and technical fields, this course will examine 
policy and scientific issues concerning the qual- 
ity of the environment. Topics will include: the 
Clean Air Act and air quality measurements; the 
Safe Drinking Water Act and water resource pro- 
tection; the Toxic Substance Control Act and 
health effects from environmental pollutants; and 
the disposal of hazardous and solid wastes. 

Charles M. Spooner 

GE 794 and GE 796 Seminar in Geology (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

The analysis and discussion of topics of cur- 
rent interest in geology. The Department 

GE 795 and GE 797 Seminar in Geophysics 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

The analysis and discussion of topics of cur- 
rent interest in geophysics. The Department 

The following elective courses are offered by 
the Department on a regular basis. 
GE 145 Geophysical Hazards 
GE 191 Origins of Man Laboratory* 
GE 195 Radiation, Environment, and Society 
GE 240 Seminar in Regional Geology 
GE 250 Environmental Geology 
GE 251 Environmental Geology Laboratory 
GE 302 Geochemistry 

GE 325 Geologic Computing and Computer 
Graphing 

GE 330 Principles of Paleontology 
GE 331 Principles of Paleontology Laboratory 
GE 345 Human Evolution and Paleontology 

GE 460 Modern and Ancient Sedimentary 

Environments 

GE 505 Micropaleontology* 

GE 520 Sedimentary Petrology* 

GE 525 Theory of Mineral Equilibria 

GE 526 Igneous Petrology 

GE 528 Metamorphic Petrology 

GE 539 Coastal Geology 

GE 542 Engineering Geology 

GE 547 Advanced Structural Geology 

GE 550 Geostatistics 

GE 610 Physical Sedimentation 

GE 61 1 Physical Sedimentation Laboratory* 

GE 640 Geomechanics 

GE661 Theoretical Seismology 

GE 662 Geomagnetism 

GE 672 Physics of the Earth 

GE 690 Tectonics of the Appalachian Orogen and 

Related Terrains 



Collf.gr of Arts & Sciences • Germanic Studies 



59 



Germanic Studies 



FACULTY 

Heinz Bluhm, Professor Emeritus; A.B., North- 
western College; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin 

Christoph Eykman, Professor; Ph.D., Rhein, 
Friedr. Wilhelm Universitat, Bonn 

Professor Michael Resler, Professor, Chairper- 
son of the Department; A.B., The College of Wil- 
liam and Mary; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity 

Gert Bruhn, Assistant Professor; A.B., Univer- 
sity of British Columbia; A.M., Ph.D., 
Princeton University 

Valda Melngailis, Special Lecturer; A.B., A.M., 
Boston University; Ph.D., Harvard University 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The major in Germanic Studies is designed to 
give the student an active command of the Ger- 
man language, an insight into German literature 
and culture, and to provide the background for 
graduate study in the field. 

Students majoring in Germanic Studies are 
required to complete a total of 12 courses within 
the following curriculum: 

1. Composition and Conversation (2) 

2. History of German Literature (2) 

3 . Four semester courses in German literature 
or culture (4) 

4. Two semester courses in subjects related to 
German culture. For example: EN 350, FA 232, 
HS 143, PL 338-339, PL 421, PL 448, PL 455, 
PL 52 1 and others, subject to the approval of the 
Department. 

5. Two electives either in German literature 
(in German or in English translation), or in a sec- 
ond foreign language. (2) 

Subject to Departmental approval, the Hon- 
ors Program in German is offered to interested 
students who maintain a cumulative average of at 
least 3.3 in German. These students are advised 
to begin in the second semester of their junior 
year, under the direction of a member of the 
Department, a research project which will lead to 
an Honors Thesis. 

The Minor in German Studies 

The minor in German Studies offers an interdis- 
ciplinary approach to the language and cultures 
of Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The fore- 
most goal of the program is to provide partici- 
pants with a broad, yet in-depth understanding of 
the various contributions which German-speak- 
ing civilization has made — from the early Middle 
Ages up to the present — to the development of the 
Western world. Among the disciplines which may 
be studied are the literature, art, music, history, 
theology, and philosophy of the German world. 
For specific requirements of the German 
Studies minor, see the "Minors" section in the 
College of Arts and Sciences section of this Cata- 
log. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

GM 001-002 German A (Elementary) (F: 3-S: 3) 

The fundamentals of German grammar and vo- 
cabulary. Practice in listening comprehension and 
speaking in everyday situations. Exercises in read- 
ing and in elementary German composition. 

The Department 

GM 050-051 intermediate German (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: GM 001-002, or its equivalent 

Further training in active use of the language, 
with emphasis on reading and conversation. Read- 
ings in 20th century German prose, fiction, and 
non-fiction. German culture and society. Gram- 
mar review. Discussion and composition. 

The Department 

GM 199 Intensive Reading Course in German 

(F:0) 

The course prepares the student for either a 
graduate language reading examination or the 
standardized Princeton type of test and provides 
him or her with the ability to read general or spe- 
cialized material in his or her own as well as re- 
lated major fields. Note: No previous German is 
required for this course. Gert Bruhn 

GM 201-202 German Composition and 
Conversation (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: GM 050-051, or its equivalent 

This course is designed to improve fluency in 
spoken German. Short compositions will be writ- 
ten periodically. Course work also includes review 
of selected difficult areas of grammar (with exer- 
cises), systematic vocabulary building, listening 
comprehension, reading and discussion of news- 
paper articles, plays, and other texts dealing with 
current aspects of life in modern Germany. 
A required course for German majors. 

Christoph Eykman 

GM 203 Introduction to Reading German Prose 

(F:3) 

The course functions as a "bridge" between a 
composition/conversation course and courses in 
German literature/culture. Systematic reading 
practice (fiction, essays, news articles) will lead to 
improved reading skills. This course counts to- 
ward the major or minor in Germanic Studies. 

Christoph Eykman 

GM 210-21 1 History of German Literature 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: GM 050-05 1 (with an honor grade), 
or its equivalent. 

An introduction to the study of German lit- 
erature. Middle Ages to the 20th century will be 
analyzed against the background of historical 
events and European literary movements. A re- 
quired course for German majors. Offered next in 
1994-1995. Valda Melngailis 

GM 213 Masterpieces of Contemporary 
German Literature (S: 3) 

Selected texts written after the end of World War 
II (novels, short stories, plays, poems) will be read 
in English translation and analyzed and discussed 
in class. These works represent some of the burn- 
ing issues with which the societies of East and 



West Germany, Switzerland, and Austria were 
confronted during the years after 1945 such as 
coping with the National Socialist past and the 
Second World War, the nuclear threat, socialist 
society versus the individual, the division of Ger- 
many, a critique of capitalist West German soci- 
ety etc. 

Works by Borchert, Boll, Lenz, Grass, John- 
son, Durrenmatt, Frisch, Bernhard and others will 
be read. Taught in English. 

Christoph Eykman 

GM 222 The German Novelle from Kleist to 
Kafka (S: 3) 

A critical study of the evolution of the Novelle as 
an important genre in modern German literature. 
Discussion of literary, cultural and political influ- 
ences on both the theory and practice of the No- 
velle from the early 19th to the middle of the 20th 
century. Readings include stories by Kleist, Tieck, 
Stifter, Meyer, Hauptmann, Hesse, Mann and 
Kafka. Gert Bruhn 

GM 242 Germany Divided and Reunited (S: 3) 

A multi-dimensional look at post-war Germany, 
East and West. Politics, social structure, music, 
art, literature, philosophy, the crisis and reform 
of the West German university system, the young 
generation, Americanization, and other topics. 
Conducted in English. This course is required for 
the minor in German Studies. Offered next: Fall 
1993. Christoph Eykman 

GM 271 Thomas Mann (F: 3) 

A study of Mann's craft of fiction and his contri- 
bution to the modern German novel. Topics to 
be discussed: art, politics, and the daemonic; ro- 
manticism and realism; decadence and progress; 
Germany as a theme in Mann's novels and essays; 
the influence of Goethe, Wagner, and Nietzsche. 
Readings include: Tonio Kroger, Der Tod in 
Venedig, Der Zauherherg, and Doktor Faustus. 

Gert Bruhn 

GM 280 Goethe's Faust I (F: 3) 

An interpretation of the First Part of Goethe's 
Faust, one of the masterpieces of world literature. 
The Faust theme in European literature before 
and after Goethe. The intellectual background of 
German Storm and Stress and Classicism: 
Herder, Kant, Nietzsche, Mozart, Beethoven, 
Schubert. Faust seen in the larger context of 
Goethe's general view of life. Conducted in En- 
glish Heinz Bluhm 

GM 281 Goethe's Faust II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: GM 280 

An interpretation of the Second Part of 
Goethe's Faust, one of the masterpieces of world 
literature. The Faust theme in European litera- 
ture before and after Goethe. The intellectual 
background of German Classicism and Roman- 
ticism: Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Beethoven, 
Schumann. Faust seen in the larger context of 
Goethe's general view of life. 
Conducted in English Heinz Bluhm 



60 • College of Arts & Sciences • History 



H 



T 



O 



R 



GM 299 Reading and Research 

Supervised reading within specific areas, for the 
solution of individual problems of research. This 
course may be taken only with permission of the 
Chairperson. By arrangement The Department 

Other courses in the Department's repertory, 
offered on a non-periodic basis, include: 
GM 175 Highlights of German Culture 
GM 2 1 5 German Romanticism 

GM 217 German Literature: The Classical 
Period 

GM 219 German Lyric Poetry through Goethe 

GM 220 Goethe and Schiller 

GM 223 Contemporary German Fiction 

GM 225 German Literature — The 19th 
Century 

GM 230 German 19th-century Drama 

GM 231 German Expressionism (1910-1925) 

GM 232 Nietzsche's Also sprach Zarathustra 

GM 235 Modern German Drama 

GM 237 20th Century German Poetry 

GM 238 Die Lieder von der Vogelweide 

GM 239 German Literature of the High Middle 

Ages 

GM 240 King Arthur in German Literature 

GM 242 Germany Divided and Reunited 

GM 246 Heinrich Boll and the Post- War 

German Novel (in translation) 

GM 247 German Exile Writers Against Hitler 

GM 250 The German War Novel 

GM 279 Brecht and Kafka 



FACULTY 

Andrew Buni, Professor; A.B., A.M., University 
of New Hampshire; Ph.D., University of Vir- 
ginia 

James E. Cronin, Professor, Chairperson of the 
Department; Director of Graduate Studies B.A., 
Boston College; M.A., Northeastern Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Radu R. Florescu, Professor; A.B., A.M., 
B.Litt., Oxford University; Ph.D., Indiana Uni- 
versity 

John L. Heineman, Professor; A.B., University 
of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Raymond T. McNally, Professor; A.B., 
Fordham University; Ph.D., Free University of 
Berlin 

David A. Northrup, Professor; B.S., M.A., 
Fordham University; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of California, Los Angeles 

Thomas H. O'Connor, Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Boston College; Ph.D., Boston University 

Alan Reinerman, Professor; B.S., A.M., Xavier 
University; Ph.D., Loyola University 

Peter H. Weiler, Professor; A.B., Stanford Uni- 
versity; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard Unversity 

Silas H. L. Wu, Professor; A.B., National Tai- 
wan University; A.B., University of California 
at Berkeley; A.M., Yale University; Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia University 

Benjamin Braude, Associate Professor; A.B., 
AM., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Paul Breines, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Robin Fleming, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California at Santa Bar- 
bara 

Ellen G. Friedman, Associate Professor; B.A., 
New York University; Ph.D., C.U.N.Y. Grad 
School 

Mark I. Gelfand, Associate Professor; A.B., City 
College of New York; A.M., Harvard Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Columbia University 

R. Alan Lawson, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Brown University; A.M., University of Wiscon- 
sin; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Roberta Manning, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Rice College; A.M., Ph.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity 

Rev. Francis J. Murphy, Associate Professor; 
A.B., Holy Cross; A.M., Ph.D., Catholic Uni- 
versity 

Kevin O'Neill, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Marquette University; A.M., Loyola Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Brown University 

Thomas W. Perry, Associate Professor; A.B., 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 



Carol M. Petillo, Associate Professor, Director of 
Graduate Studies; A.B., Montclair State College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Virginia ReinburgyAssociate Professor; A.B., 
Georgetown University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Princeton University 

Alan Rogers, Associate Professor; A.B., M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara 

John H. Rosser, Associate Professor; A.B., Uni- 
versity of Maryland; A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers Uni- 
versity 

Judith E. Smith, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Radcliffe College; M.A., Ph.D., Brown Univer- 
sity 

Paul G. Spagnoli, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Holy Cross; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Karen Spalding, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
California at Berkeley 

John Tutino, Associate Professor; A.B., College 
of the Holy Cross; Ph.D., University of Texas 
at Austin 

L. Scott Van Doren, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Oberlin College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity 

Lawrence Wolff, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Harvard College; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford Uni- 
versity 

Sherri Broder, Assistant Professor; B.A., Hamp- 
shire College; M.A., State University of New 
York at Binghamton; Ph.D., Brown University 

Karen Miller, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., 
University of California at San Diego; Ph.D., 
University of California at Santa Barbara 

Mrinalini Sinha, Assistant Professor; M.A., 
Jawahawlal Nehru University; M.A., Ph.D., 
S.U.N.Y. 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department of History offers the under- 
graduate student a variety of courses in Medieval 
European, Early Modern and Modern European, 
Russian, East European, United States, Latin 
American, Asian, Middle East, and African His- 
tory. Careful planning, with the advice of faculty 
members, can provide the student with a sequence 
of courses which will prepare him or her for the 
fields of law, government, and the foreign service, 
and for a career in various international organi- 
zations, in journalism, in business, or in teaching 
at the elementary, secondary, or college levels. 

A history major is required to take a two-se- 
mester sequence in European history since the 
Renaissance (selection from any course HS 
001-002 through HS 094), and a two-semester 
sequence in American Civilization (HS 181-182). 
Students planning to concentrate in history are 



College of Arts & Sciences • History • 61 



encouraged to take European history in their 
freshman year, and American Civilization in their 
sophomore year. Once they have fulfilled these 
requirements they will have acquired the prereq- 
uisite for most elective courses in junior and se- 
nior years. Beginning students who have advanced 
placement or who have successfully passed the 
Departmental qualifying examinations, offered 
annually in the fall, may substitute an upper-di- 
vision course in European or American history for 
these required courses. 

In addition to the prescribed courses listed 
above, the history major is required to complete 
eight additional upper division electives. For 
majors through the Class of 1994, these courses 
must include the following: at least two courses 
in some field of history either before 1500 and/ 
or in non- Western history, and four advanced 
electives (HS 300-699; a maximum of two may 
be HS 299 Reading and Research courses). Note 
that some advanced electives also satisfy the pre- 
1500/non- Western requirement. In order to as- 
sure a well-balanced program, no more than four 
upper division courses should be in any single 
field. 

For majors in the Class of 1995, the require- 
ments have changed somewhat. In addition to the 
Core and the American Civilization requirement, 
such majors must take an HS 300: "Study and 
Writing of History" course (taken in the sopho- 
more or junior years), and seven elective courses 
that must include the following: two in non- 
Western history and three advanced electives (HS 
301-699; a maximum of two can be HS 299 Read- 
ing and Research courses). Note that some ad- 
vanced electives also satisfy the non-Western re- 
quirement. In addition, at least three of the elec- 
tives, including two of the advanced electives, 
must be in a field approved by the History De- 
partment advisor. For a list of possible fields, 
please consult the History Department. 

Within the general context described above, 
a history major may choose to pursue a special- 
ized program in Irish Studies. The program of- 
fers a junior year in Irish Studies at University 
College, Cork, which provides intensive exposure 
in areas of Irish culture not normally available in 
the United States, such as Irish ethnography, folk- 
lore, and anthropology. Interested students 
should apply to the Junior Year Abroad office or 
see Professors Dalsimer and O'Neill of the En- 
glish and History Departments. 

In order to facilitate the introduction of re- 
search techniques the Department offers a vari- 
ety of Readings and Research opportunities. 
These projects must be arranged between the 
individual student and professor, and then receive 
the permission of the Director of Undergraduate 
Studies. No more than 2 courses completed in this 
fashion will count towards the history major. 

Core 

The Core Requirement in history is a two-semes- 
ter sequence centering on modern European his- 
tory (1500 to the present). To fulfill the Core 



requirement, all undergraduates must take a two- 
semester sequence from courses numbered HS 
001-02 to HS 081-82. Any of these two-semes- 
ter survey courses will fulfill the Core require- 
ment. Because all of these courses are designed as 
thematic units, students should continue in the 
same class for the entire year, but upon comple- 
tion of the first half of one course, students may 
enroll in another second-half course. In no case, 
however, will students be permitted to take the 
courses out of order; the first half must be com- 
pleted before enrolling in the second. Students are 
strongly urged to fulfill the history Core require- 
ment in their freshman year or, at the latest, dur- 
ing their sophomore year. Students planning to 
study abroad during their junior year are strongly 
advised to complete their history Core before 
embarking on such studies. 

Content and Format of the Core 

Each of the courses listed as Core below has dis- 
tinctive emphases, reflecting the interests and 
expertise of the instructors, and wherever possible 
they have been given specific titles which describe 
these emphases. Thus, in the following list, we 
have Core courses that concentrate primarily on 
Western Europe, or on Eastern Europe, on Eu- 
rope and the Americas, or Europe and the World. 
Nevertheless every history Core course follows a 
common set of general guidelines and topics as 
required by the History Department. Although 
individual Core descriptions stress the differences 
in approach of each of the courses, this should not 
disguise the fact that all of the Core courses listed 
below have the following basic set of topics in 
common. These topics are: 

First semester: The Renaissance, the Reforma- 
tion, and the Counter-Reformation; exploration 
and overseas trade; the social structure of early 
modern Europe; the development of the bureau- 
cratic state; international relations and warfare; 
the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment; 
the development of capitalism and the origins of 
the Industrial Revolution; the revolutions in sev- 
enteenth-century England and eighteenth-cen- 
tury France; women, the family and gender roles. 

Second semester: Napoleon; the Congress of 
Vienna; nineteenth-century conservative and lib- 
eral political theories; nationalism, the unifica- 
tions of Italy and Germany; Marx and Darwin and 
their influence on modern thought; the develop- 
ment of modern industry; imperialism and colo- 
nialism; international relations and World War 
I; the Russian Revolution; Fascism and the De- 
pression; World War II; the postwar world; 
women, the family, and gender roles. 

All of the Core history courses numbered HS 
001-002 through HS 067-068 consist of large 
classes taught by a team of professors (either 
jointly, or splitting the year between them). All 
Core classes meet twice each week for lectures and 
a third time in groups of 20-22 students for dis- 
cussion of selected topics. These weekly discus- 
sion sections are an integral part of each Core 
course. 



The Core history program is also offered in 
three other slightly different formats: HS 081-82 
is taught in small classes (35 students). HS 087-88 
is taught in French as part of the Immersion Pro- 
gram. Finally, HS 093 (spring term) covers the 
topics of the first half of the Core; HS 094 (fall 
term) covers the topics of the second half of the 
Core; these "reverse sequence" courses are in- 
tended solely for students who need to begin or 
complete their history Core courses out of the 
normal semester pattern. As noted above, the his- 
tory Core requirement is a two-semester sequence; 
students must complete the first half of the se- 
quence (covering material from 1500 to 1789) 
before enrolling in the second half of the sequence 
(covering material from 1789 to the present). In 
other words, a student must complete an "odd- 
numbered" Core course before enrolling in an 
"even-numbered" Core continuation. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

HS 001-002 Institutional and Cultural History 
of Modern Europe (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course, although intensive and demanding, 
is designed for any student (major or non-major) 
who is interested in tracing the evolution of west- 
ern society to the present day. It presents an in- 
terpretation of the broad lines of historical devel- 
opment from about 1500 to the present day. 
Though mainly focused on western Europe, it 
explains that the expansion of European power 
and influence which began in the 16th century and 
continues to this very day made these European 
developments essential to an understanding of the 
history of the non-European world as well. Em- 
phasis will be placed on the social, political and 
institutional stresses and changes, with attention 
also to the relation of these factors to the world 
of ideas and the arts. In the first semester, special 
topics include the rise of absolute bureaucratic 
states, warfare and diplomacy in the old regime, 
and the Enlightenment. The second semester will 
cover the French Revolution, the search for new 
authorities as represented by the ideologies of 
conservatism, liberalism, communism and fas- 
cism, the impact upon thought and society of two 
world wars, and the resurgence of Europe in the 
apparent wake of the end of the Cold War. 

Thomas Perry 
John Heineman 

HS 005-006 Social and Economic Development 
of Modern Europe (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course traces the changes that have created 
today's world out of the very different world of 
the late Middle Ages. During the year we will 
examine the move from a unified Christendom to 
a divided Europe and study the growth of a bu- 
reaucratized and controlling state and a capitalist 
market economy. We will also analyze the chang- 
ing social structure of Europe, the interactions 
between Europe and the wider world, the urban- 
ization and industrialization of Europe, the 
struggles between the proponents and critics of 



62 • College of Arts & Sciences • History 



Protestantism, constitutionalism, and capitalism, 
the causes and consequences of wars and revolu- 
tions, and the impact of social and economic 
changes on the way in which people in the West 
have viewed the world in which they lived. 

Paul Spagrioli 

HS 01 1-012 Political and Social History of 
Modern Europe (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will survey the major developments 
in Europe from the Renaissance. Emphasis will 
be placed upon social and political developments, 
particularly as seen through the Renaissance, 
Reformation, overseas expansion, and the forma- 
tion of the modern states. The interesting theme 
for the second semester will be the conflicting 
demands of individual liberty and social need in 
the period since the French Revolution with par- 
ticular reference to industrialization, the Euro- 
pean state system, imperialism, World War I, and 
the rise of dictatorships culminating in World 
War II. The Department 

HS 015-016 Cultural History of Modern Europe 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course seeks to examine the interactions of 
the persons, ideas, institutions and movements 
which have shaped the European Experience from 
the Renaissance through the Reconstruction of 
Europe after World War II. During the first se- 
mester, man's changing concept of himself and his 
world will be treated with special emphasis on the 
Renaissance and the Reformation, the discover- 
ies of explorers and scientists, and the Enlighten- 
ment. During the second semester, the integrat- 
ing theme will be the conflicting demands of in- 
dividual liberty and social welfare, with particu- 
lar reference to the French Revolution industri- 
alization, imperialism, the first and second world 
wars, totalitarianism and the rebuilding of Europe 
since 1945. Francis Murphy, S.J. 

HS 019-020 Political and Intellectual History of 
Modern Europe (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course treats the history of the European 
world since 1 500, emphasizing religious, intellec- 
tual, and political developments. Topics covered 
in depth include the search for new intellectual 
and religious authorities in the Renaissance and 
Reformation; state building and constitutional 
conflicts in England and France; the scientific 
revolution; the Enlightenment; and 18th century 
revolutions. Throughout the course, ideas and 
institutions will be explored within clearly defined 
social contexts. Attention will also be devoted to 
women's lives and questions of gender within the 
religious and political debates of the era. Second 
semester will cover industrialization; 19th— 20th 
century wars and revolutions; and the search for 
new political and intellectual authorities through 
modern ideologies of Marxism, liberalism, con- 
servatism, and fascism. Raymond McNally 

HS 023-024 Social and Cultural History of 
Modern Europe (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course surveys the evolution of western 
Europe from the end of the Middle Ages through 
the collapse of the Soviet Empire in 1989. Spe- 
cial attention is given to the following issues: the 
triumph of liberal capitalism, the rise of the bour- 
geoisie, the development of the modern state, the 
emergence of new forms of conquest and domi- 
nation over the natural and non-European worlds. 



We will examine these aspects of the West's de- 
velopment with particular emphasis on the signifi- 
cance of gender, race and class and other forms 
of difference. Paul Breines 

Peter Weiler 

HS 027-028 Political and Cultural History of 
Modern Europe (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course surveys the broad lines of historical 
development of Europe from the Renaissance to 
the present, with the intention of explaining how 
the unique western society in which we live to- 
day came into being. Though the instructor con- 
centrates on Europe, he will make clear that the 
great expansion of European power and culture 
since 1500 has made the development of Europe 
the key to understanding the modern world as a 
whole. Alan Reinerman 

HS 031-032 Europe and the Atlantic 
Community (F: 3-S: 3) 

A study of the Atlantic community and its role in 
the emergence of the world economy since 1 500. 
Topics to receive primary consideration include: 
(first semester) the structure of traditional Euro- 
pean and American societies, the impact of Eu- 
ropean expansion on European and American 
society and economy, the emergence of colonial 
America, and the age of revolution; (second se- 
mester) the Atlantic orientation of industrial de- 
velopment, the development of liberal democracy, 
socialism, Fascism and the age of national libera- 
tion. Alan Rogers 

The Department 

HS 045-046 Social and Political Evolution of 
Modern Europe (F: 3-S: 3) 

European social and political history from 1500 
to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on 
nation-building, European expansion, alternate 
economic systems, the role of the lower classes, 
the impact of military technology, the persecution 
of minority groups, the revolt of the colonies and 
the changing position of women. The regional 
interests of the instructors — Spain in the first se- 
mester and Russia in the second — will be high- 
lighted as warranted by the historical roles of these 
nations in the periods under study. 

Roberta Manning 

HS 051-052 Europeans and the World (F: 3-S: 3) 

Since 1500 there have been dramatic changes in 
European political, economic, and cultural life. 
Europe's expansion overseas produced equally 
dramatic contacts and conflicts with the rest of die 
world. The first term explores these events in the 
Atlantic basin from 1 500 to 1 800, emphasizing the 
interaction of Spaniards and Mexicans, Britons 
and North Americans. It also probes the roles of 
Europeans and Africans in the creation of slave 
societies, and in the traditions of conflict and re- 
sistance that culminated in the French and Hai- 
tian revolutions. The second term explores the 
impact of industrialization and modern technol- 
ogy in P'urope and in European settlements over- 
seas and the impact of Western political and eco- 
nomic imperialism in Africa, Asia, and the Pacific 
since 1800. It also examines the rise of doctrines 
of equality in the nineteenth century, leading to 
movements for slave emancipation, women's 
rights, political democracy and socialism, as well 
as the simultaneous growth of doctrines of in- 
equality, defending the supremacy of whites, 



males, and Western culture. The conflicts, wars 
and revolutions of the twentieth century are in- 
terpreted in the context of these material, politi- 
cal and ideological forces. A quarter of the semes- 
ter is concerned with the period since 1945. 

John Tutino 
David Northrup 

HS 059-060 Rise of Europe: East/West (F: 3-S: 3) 

Today the oil wealth of the Middle East seems to 
threaten the West — such a fear is not completely 
new. In 1500 Europe also trembled before the 
power of a Middle Eastern power, the Ottoman 
Empire. Over the centuries Europe built a resil- 
ient system of states, introduced scientific and 
technological innovations, fostered economic 
growth, and expanded its territory overseas. By 
the beginning of the twentieth century Europe 
was all-powerful. What have been the factors 
behind Europe's rise to power during this early 
period? What has undermined Europe subse- 
quently? Benjamin Braude 

HS 067-068 The West and the World: Asia and 
the Americas (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course examines the dramatic changes in 
European political, economic, and cultural life 
since 1 500, and Europe's expansion overseas. The 
first semester will concern primarily European 
expansion in the Atlantic basin, while in the sec- 
ond semester attention will shift to the impact of 
Western imperialism in Asia and the Pacific ba- 
sin. Karen Spalding 

Mrinalini Sin ha 

HS 081-082 Europe Since 1 500 (F: 3-S: 3) 

This two-semester survey examines the develop- 
ment of European life and culture from the Re- 
naissance. The first semester will end at the 
French Revolution, while the second semester will 
continue the story to the contemporary world. 

The Department 

HS 093 Europe 1 500 to 1 789 (S: 3) 

A reverse sequence section of the Core. This is 
the first half of the history Core, although taught 
in the second semester. The Department 

HS 094 Europe 1 789 to the Present (F: 3) 

This second part of the two-semester history 
Core sequence is offered in the fall term, and is 
designed for students who have completed the 
first half of the Core (any odd-numbered history 
Core course), and who wish to continue their his- 
tory Core in the fall term. The Department 

Undergraduate Electives for Non-Majors 

All courses above 100 require as a prerequisite the 
successful completion of the Core (HS 001-002 
through HS 094). Most of the following electives, 
though taught as year courses, may be taken for 
one semester only. Students should consult the 
Department or die individual professor for advice. 

HS 104 American Presidency (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

In November 1992 the American people will 
go to the polls to elect their next President. 
Against the backdrop of this exercise in popular 
government, this course will examine the histori- 
cal roots of the modern Presidency. Although we 
will go back to the 1 8th century origins and 1 9th 
century experiences of the Executive Branch, our 
focus will be on the 20th century, particularly the 



College of Arts & Sciences • History 



63 



years since Franklin Roosevelt first took over the 
office in 1933. Among the topics to be covered 
are: the control of foreign policy (including co- 
vert operations), economic decision-making, ex- 
ecutive privilege, impeachment, and the role of 
the media. Mark Gelfand 

HS 108 Great American Courtroom Battles (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

The American courtroom sometimes has been 
the forum in which important issues of morality 
and politics are thrashed out publicly. From the 
murder trial of Lizzie Borden in 1892, to the 
"Black Sox" Scandal, to the court-martial of Lt. 
William Galley, matters of historic significance 
have been articulated by lawyers and followed 
closely by an interested public. The cases selected 
for this course will be analyzed as examples of 
American values and problems during the time 
the trial occurred. Alan Rogers 

HS 109 Conflicts in the Middle East (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094.' 

What are the roots of the many conflicts 
which afflict this region today? In this course you 
are introduced to the causes for such conflicts as 
the Arab-Israel dispute, the civil strife in Leba- 
non, the Iran-Iraq war, the struggle between 
Greece and Turkey over Cyprus, and Great 
Power clashes in the region. Among the topics to 
be analyzed are the roles of religion, nationalism, 
ethnic identity, economics, geo-political strategy, 
and personality in determining the course of dis- 
putes. Not normally available for major credit. 
This is a course for non-majors. Benjamin Braude 

HS 1 1 1 The War in Vietnam (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

After a brief survey of Vietnamese history with 
particular emphasis on the French colonial period, 
this course will examine U.S. involvement in Viet- 
nam from 1945 to 1975. It will use as its central 
core the thirteen-part PBS series on Vietnam, one 
segment of which will be shown during one class 
period each week. Lectures will be topical and 
include discussions of political and religious elites 
in South Vietnam, the distinctions between post- 
colonial nationalism and international commu- 
nism, differences in leadership styles and their 
implications, this war compared to other U.S. 
wars, draft-resistance and desertion, anti-war ac- 
tivism in the U.S. and the literature and art of the 
war. Guest lecturers will occasionally appear. 

Carol M. Petillo 

HS 1 17-1 18 American Heritage (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001-002 
through HS 094. 

A survey of the major events of American his- 
tory from the pre-Columbian period to the 
present. Covers the political system, emergence 
of an industrial society, the role of immigrants, 
minorities, and women in American society, and 
the international role of the United States. For 
non-majors. Andrew Buni 

HS 1 36 Legends of History (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course will study the impact of non-ra- 
tional beliefs upon the men and events of each 



period and examine their causes down to the 
present. Stress will be placed upon the lives and 
roles of the more famous astrologists, oracles, 
chimorancers, sorcerers, and alchemists. The 
causes of manifestations such as witchcraft, 
vampirism and lycanthropy will be examined. A 
portion of this course will be devoted to folkloric 
beliefs and their historical relevance. The liter- 
ary interpretations of such myths will be included. 

Radu Florescu 

HS 1 53 History of China (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A survey of Chinese history, from the Classi- 
cal Age to the present, with emphasis on ideas and 
institutions, and with attention also to social, po- 
litical and international developments. Silas Wu 

HS 1 54 History of Modern Japan (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A survey of modern Japanese history from the 
17th century to the present. Major subjects in- 
clude: legacy of the Tokugawa era, the Meiji Res- 
toration, rise of ultranationalism and militarism, 
World War II, occupation and post-war recov- 
ery and its spectacular recovery as well as Japan's 
current status and problems as a super economic 
power. One third of the semester will be devoted 
to class discussions on salient aspects of Japanese 
society, politics and government, as well as busi- 
ness ethics and practices. Silas Wu 

HS 181-182 American Civilization (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A survey of the political, social, economic, and 
intellectual developments that have shaped and 
influenced the growth of the United States from 
a colonial appendage to a world power. Based 
upon a sound foundation of the framework of 
American history, this course will give students 
insights into the institutions, society, economy, 
and ideas upon which American Civilization is 
founded. Consideration will be given to continu- 
ity, change, and conflict in American society. 

The Department 

HS 192 (EC 396) (PO 520) (RL 300) The 
European Experience (Summer: 3) 

See the course description for this special sum- 
mer program under PO 520. 

Rev. Francis Murphy 

HS 203 Nationalism and Inter-Ethnic Conflicts 
in Europe (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course will study the rise of national sen- 
timent, ethnicity and irredentism and their impact 
on international relations from 1870-1970, dur- 
ing the inter-war, fascist and communist periods 
and following the downfall of communism. Study 
of the earlier period will provide examples of the 
manner in which international diplomacy helped 
lessen such tensions. Following an analysis of the 
origins of critical areas of conflict (the Serb-Croat 
war; the Romanian-Hungarian; the Czech and 
Slovak controversy, etc.) students will be encour- 
aged to write papers emphasizing the role and 
responsibilities of the historian in helping lessen 
such tensions and eventually provide solutions to 
existing ethnic or religious problems. Special at- 



tention will be given to the relevancy of interna- 
tional law and international institutions, "minor- 
ity rights," and the idea of federation or confed- 
eration. Radu Florescu 

HS 207 (TH 308) Islamic Civilization in the 
Middle East (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

Islam has been a dominant element in the 
Middle East since Muhammad first preached in 
Mecca at the beginning of the seventh century. 
Muhammad was both prophet and statesman and 
the impact of this joint mission has been felt 
through the centuries down to the Ayatollah 
Khomeini in our own day. What have been the 
major achievements of this religio-centric culture 
at the strategic cross-roads of Asia, Africa, and 
Europe? This course seeks to answer these and 
other related questions as it explores the relation 
of Islam to the religions of late antiquity, the re- 
ligious system of Islam, political and military 
trends, social and economic tensions, and move- 
ments for reform and religious revival. 

Benjamin Braude 

HS 21 1 European Unification (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course will examine the process of Eu- 
ropean unification as embodied in the develop- 
ment of the European Community. The histori- 
cal context out of which the present European 
Community has emerged will be studied in its 
various stages — early aspirations; World War II, 
the Resistance ideals, the European Coal and 
Steel Community, the Treaty of Rome and the 
European Economic Community. More recent 
concerns such as DeGaulle's concept of Europe, 
Expansion vs. Political Integration, Defense, Ex- 
ternal Relations, Eurocurrency and the prospects 
for further European unification will be con- 
cretely considered as well. Rev . Francis Murphy 

HS 217 History of Transylvania (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

Transylvania represents a Switzerland of the 
Balkans because of the diversity of peoples, reli- 
gions and cultures (Germans, Romanians, Hun- 
garians, Slavs, Szekelys as well as Orthodox, 
Lutherans, Calvinists, Unitarians, etc.) For the 
student of history the area is of particular inter- 
est for its Central and East European cultural, 
economic and social cross currents. A transition 
zone between the Thracian and Roman world, the 
region lies at the forefront of the anti-Ottoman 
crusades. It was profoundly affected by the twin 
currents of both Renaissance and Reformation as 
well as the Enlightenment of Josephinism. The 
ideals of the French revolution also found an echo. 
Romanian nationalism traces its cultural latinist 
origin to that land. During the 19th century 
Transylvania becomes "the Alsace-Lorraine of 
Eastern Europe," and one of the principal reasons 
for Romania's participation in the First World 
War. The interwar period introduces the diplo- 
macy of Hungarian revisionism, the Nazi period 
that of Hungarian dictatorship, while the post-war 
socialist period alternates between the concept of 
communism, internationalism and the revival of 
traditional tensions between Hungarians and 
Romanians. Radu Florescu 



64 • College of Arts & Sciences • History 



HS 218 Georgian Civilization (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A comprehensive look at Georgian England, 
with emphasis on cultural and social history, and 
just enough political background to provide con- 
text and continuity. Major topics will include ar- 
chitecture, painting, landscape gardening, furni- 
ture and decorations, theater, music, and litera- 
ture. Thomas W. Periy 

HS 221 France from Napoleon to the First World 
War (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

Beginning with an investigation of France's 
condition as it emerged from the great Revolu- 
tion, the course will continue with Napoleon's 
liquidation of the Revolution and then trace the 
revolutionary legacy as it worked itself out in the 
political and social movements of the nineteenth 
century- The story of French economic develop- 
ment will be interwoven with the turbulent po- 
litical and social history of the succeeding mon- 
archies, empires, and republics, and the interven- 
ing revolutions of 1830, 1848, and 1870-71. The 
course will conclude with an examination of 
France on the eve of the First World War. 

Paul Spagitoli 

HS 229 History of Modern Italy (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course studies the cultural, social, intel- 
lectual, and political developments which shaped 
Italy from the Risorgimento of the 19th century 
through Mussolini's Fascism to the modern re- 
public. Alan Reinerman 

HS 234 Emergence of Mass Consumer Culture 

(S:3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course will locate the historical develop- 
ment of consumer culture as a central problem in 
twentieth-century U.S. popular culture. Lectures 
and discussions will focus on the tensions between 
producers' intentions and consumers' appropria- 
tions in cultural sites such as amusement parks, 
dance halls, vaudeville, burlesque and movie the- 
aters, radio, television, advertising. The changing 
meaning of work and leisure and the process by 
which consumer culture constructs racial, class, 
and gender identities will be continuing questions 
throughout the semester. Judith Smith 

HS 236 Parents and Children in European 
History (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through I IS 094. 

This course examines historically the idea of 
childhood and evolving views on the relation be- 
tween parents and children in European history. 
There will be a particular emphasis on the cru- 
cial intellectual formulations of the Farly Mod- 
ern period — in Locke and Rousseau, for in- 
stance — and how these paved the way for more 
modern conceptions — such as those of Dickens 
and Freud. Readings in cultural and intellectual 
history will be used to explore social values and 
ideals, drawing on works of philosophy, literature, 
and psychology. Lawrence Wolff 



HS 241 Historical Construction of Gender (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

How did late nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
tury American society construct norms of "man- 
liness" and "womanliness"? How did expectations 
of what it meant to be a man and to be a woman 
change as part of the historical transformations of 
work, the family, and community life? How did 
class, ethnic, and racial identity shape conceptions 
of gender? How did children learn how to be a 
woman, how to be a man? Topics will include the 
sexual division of labor among white farming 
families; commercial-industrial change and the 
creation of the ideology of separate spheres; sla- 
very and patriarchy; sexuality and state regulation; 
sexual mixing and sexual distance in popular cul- 
ture; the rising emphasis on heterosexuality and 
the sexual revolution; sexuality and consumerism. 

Judith Smith 

HS 249 (FA 296) (RL 294) Italy: Art Literature, 
History (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This is an interdisciplinary course in which 
lectures by professors from three departments will 
be presented in English. The history and culture 
of two cities — Florence and Rome — will be stud- 
ied with emphasis on political, socio-economic, 
and cultural topics for the Medieval and Renais- 
sance periods. Scott Van Dorev 

HS 253 Law and American Society (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

An examination of the role of the law in 
American life from colonial times to the present. 
This course is designed to acquaint the student 
with the influence of legal institutions upon the 
development of American political, social and 
economic patterns. Special attention will be given 
to the part played by the legal profession in the 
shaping of American society. This is not a course 
on the fine points of judicial logic, but a study of 
how Americans have viewed the law and utilized 
it to achieve their vision of a good society. 

Mark Gelfand 

HS 267 Modern Latin America (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course explores the political and social 
consequences of independence and the building 
of national states in former colonies still deeply 
dependent within the international economy; the 
long endurance and final abolition of slavery in 
Brazil and Cuba; the emergence of U.S. economic 
imperialism and military interventionism, with 
the revolutionary responses in Cuba in 1898 and 
in Mexico in 1910; the consolidation of the 
American empire after World War II, and the 
revolutionary challenges in Cuba and Central 
America. John Tutino 

HS 268 Colonial Latin America (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course is a survey of the origins of the 
societies of Latin America, defined as that part of 
the Western Hemisphere controlled by Spain and 
Portugal, from the sixteenth to the nineteenth 
centuries. The focus of the course will be on the 



development of a Latin American culture out of 
the interactions between the three major cultural 
traditions that make up Latin American society 
today: the Amerindian, the European, and the 
African. The relationships among those three tra- 
ditions, within the European world system of 
which they were a part, underlie the social, po- 
litical and intellectual patterns shared by the new 
states that emerged in the nineteenth century. We 
will be particularly concerned with comparing and 
contrasting the various forms taken by the insti- 
tutions and the social and political systems of the 
different regions of Latin America. 

Karen Spalding 

HS 272 (PO 080) Introduction to Russian, 
Soviet and East European Studies (F: 3) 

This course provides the student with the key 
themes, theories and approaches necessary for 
further detailed study of Russia, the former 
USSR, and with special emphasis on the East 
European states. The major findings and meth- 
ods used by specialists in various disciplines will 
be previewed and presented. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores. Juniors 
and seniors by permission only. Counts toward 
Social Science Core requirement. (May receive 
Political Science or History credit: for History 
credit, History Core is prerequisite, but may be 
taken simultaneously.) Donald Carlisle 

Raymond McNally 

HS 273 Gorbachev And After (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course will trace the origins and course 
of the recent changes in the former Soviet Union 
and attempt to place them in historical context. 
After a brief survey of the high points of Soviet 
history, we will explore the origins and outlook 
of the Gorbachev and Yeltsin generation of So- 
viet leaders and see how the political and eco- 
nomic systems have been reformed to date. We 
will examine parallels between the current situa- 
tion in the former Soviet Union today and the 
1960s in the U.S. and see how the Soviet Union 
is currently dealing with problems facing all in- 
dustrial nations today, like the arms race and 
nuclear arms control, environmental pollution, 
ethnic minorities, women's liberation, the genera- 
tion gap, the upbringing of the younger genera- 
tion and the maintenance of sustained economic 
growth and a decent living standard for the aver- 
age citizen during the Third Industrial Revolu- 
tion, when business enterprise has become truly 
global, out of control of national states. 

Roberta Manning 

HS 276 (BK 288) Eastern Africa (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

An interdisciplinary survey of the cultural, 
political, and economic history of the region of 
eastern Africa (a thousand miles above and below 
the equator) from the evolution of the first hu- 
mans in remote antiquity to the present. The 
course describes how Africans adapted to the 
region's diverse ecology and how they interacted 
with the outside world from the time of ancient 
Egypt through medieval Islam and modern Eu- 
ropean colonizers. It concludes by examining 
problems of political unity, economic develop- 



College of Arts & Sciences • 1 Listory • 65 



ment, and AIDS and by exploring how contem- 
porary eastern Africans are drawing on their triple 
heritage of African, Islamic, and European cul- 
tures in Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, Zaire, 
Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Rwanda, 
Burundi, and Djibuti. David Northrup 

HS 283-284 (BK 104-105) Afro-American 
History (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This two-semester survey examines the his- 
tory and culture of African-Americans from the 
pre-colonial period to the present. The first se- 
mester treats the period before the middle pas- 
sage, the evolution of slave and free society, de- 
velopment of black institutions, and emergence 
of protest movements through the Civil War's 
end. During the second semester, the emphases 
are placed on issues of freedom and equality from 
Reconstruction, urban migration, civil rights 
struggles through current consideration of race, 
class, and gender conflicts. Karen Miller 

HS 299 Readings and Research: Independent 
Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of Professor and Direc- 
tor of Undergraduate Studies; any two semesters 
ofHSOOl through HS 094. 

Students who wish to pursue a semester of 
directed readings with individual faculty members 
under this category must secure the permission 
of the faculty member and the Chairperson. Lists 
of faculty members and their fields can be ob- 
tained from the Department. The Department 

Courses numbered HS 300 are open to His- 
tory majors and required of majors in the class of 
1995 and on. The purpose of these courses will 
be to introduce students to the methodology and 
process of writing history by focusing on a topic 
for which a body of source material is readily avail- 
able. Each student is expected to write a major 
research paper using pre-selected documented 
material. 

HS 300.01 The Study and Writing of History: 
Britain, the U.S. and the Cold War (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094; history major status. 

A close study of the interaction of Britain and 
the United States in the first years of the cold war, 
1945-1951, this course will ask students to work 
with the major published collections of British and 
American foreign policy documents available in 
O'Neill library. After reading and discussing one 
or two general studies of the period, students will 
choose specific research topics (e.g. the Marshall 
Plan, the Korean War, the division of Germany) 
and spend the rest of the semester analyzing them 
with the aim of producing a paper based on pri- 
mary sources. Peter Weiler 

HS 300.02 The Study and Writing of History: 
Gender, Race and Empire (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094; history major status. 

Our aim in this course will be to analyze the 
ways in which the politics of gender and race were 
shaped and in turn shaped the imperial enterprise. 
We will begin with the assumption that just as 
colonial policies defined the society and culture 
of the colonial regions, so did the policies and 
practices necessitated by the conditions in the 



colonies define the culture of the imperial center. 
Keeping this in mind, we will examine the con- 
struction of collective racial and gendered ideals 
in a variety of source materials from British popu- 
lar culture in the nineteenth century, during a 
period that historians have called the "Age of 
Empire." In working with some of these histori- 
cal source materials we will not only learn to iden- 
tify the many connections and continuities be- 
tween metropolitan and peripheral cultures, but 
we will also learn about the different kinds of 
sources that are available to the historian of em- 
pire. Mrinalini Sinha 

HS 300.03 The Study and Writing of History: 
Blacks in Boston (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094; history major status. 

Karen Miller 

HS 300.04 The Study and Writing of History: 
Constantinople and Its Empire (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094; history major status. 

Why did the emperor Constantine transfer 
the capital of the Roman Empire to Constan- 
tinople in 330 A.D.? How important was it as the 
center of medieval "Byzantium," surviving for 
more than a thousand years? Why did it finally 
fall to the Ottoman Turks in 1453? These and 
other questions will be considered by reading in 
translation primary sources that focus on the city's 
role as the center of Christendom in the East. The 
monuments and topography of the city are also 
considered, since they provide a kind of histori- 
cal evidence that must not be overlooked. 
Constantinople (modern Istanbul) is a city that 
must be studied to be appreciated, which is what 
this course attempts to do. John Rosser 

HS 300.05 The Study and Writing of History: 
Cuba (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094; history major status. 

This section of HS 300 will introduce students 
to the practice of history and the use of primary, 
or original sources. We will do this by concen- 
trating on a particular country: Cuba, a Latin 
American republic with a long, if not always 
friendly, relationship with the United States. In 
this class, we will concentrate on the nineteenth 
century, when diplomats, investors, and entrepre- 
neurs from this country left detailed observations 
of the country that are contained in the records 
of the U.S. Department of State. During the first 
part of the course, we will read and discuss se- 
lected secondary materials on some of the major 
themes of this period in Cuban history. By the end 
of this period, students will select a topic that can 
be researched in the reports contained in the State 
Department records. The remainder of the term 
will be devoted to the preparation of a research 
paper using these sources. Students who can dem- 
onstrate a reading knowledge of Spanish can se- 
lect a topic using primary sources in that language. 
Students will present their topics and proposal as 
well as a first draft of their paper, to the other 
members of the course. Karen Spalding 

HS 300.06 The Study and Writing of History: Paul 
Goodman and the Course of Practical Utopia (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094; history major status. 



This course will seek perspective on mid- 
twentieth century America through the writings 
of Paul Goodman, a uniquely versatile novelist, 
poet, linguistics scholar, psychologist, city plan- 
ner, critic of education, and political activist. Our 
focus will be on Goodman's preoccupation with 
tire perennial American effort to find how Utopian 
thought and practical activity can be joined. 

Alan Lawson 

HS 303 The Rise of Modern China (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A survey of political, social and intellectual 
history from 1600 to the May Fourth Movement 
(Intellectual Revolution) around 1919 with spe- 
cial attention to Western impact on China's do- 
mestic development from the mid-nineteenth to 
the early twentieth century. Silas Wu 

HS 304 20th-century China (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A survey of the political, social and intellec- 
tual history of China in the twentieth century. 
The first half of the course will cover the period 
of the Republic of China from 1 9 1 2 to 1 949; the 
second half will cover the history of the People's 
Republic of China from 1949 to the present. 
Major topics are: The May Fourth Movement, 
the relationship between the Nationalists and the 
Communists; Japanese imperialism and the War 
of Resistance; the growth of Chinese communism 
and Civil War; Maoism and the cult of Mao; the 
Cultural Revolution; and China's struggle to 
modernize in the post-Mao era. Silas Wu 

HS 305 Mao and the Communist Revolution in 
China (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. ' 

A study of the Chinese Communist Revolution 
starting from its founding to the present with 
special emphasis on the personification of Mao in 
Chinese Communism. The first half of the course 
will cover the pre- 1949 years including Mao's 
early experiences in Hunan, the Long March, 
ideology and strategies during the War and the 
Civil War; the second half will cover the post- 
1949 period under the People's Republic. Atten- 
tion will also be given to the desanctification of 
Mao after 1976 under the leadership of the prag- 
matists. Silas Wu 

HS 307 Travelers and Spies in the Middle East: 
Lawrence of Arabia and His Colleagues 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094.' 

This course will examine the motives of the 
travelers, the impact of their writings, and the 
policies and politics they sought to advance. Spe- 
cific topics include: psychology of the traveler, 
works of travel as literature and history, the genre 
of travel literature; views of Islam, Arabs and 
Turks; the appeal of the East, response to and 
reception of the foreigner, Muslim travelers in the 
West, the romantic impulse for travel and the 
Industrial Revolution. Readings will be drawn 
largely from such writers as Lawrence himself, 
Richard Burton, Charles Doughty, Wilfrid 
Thesiger, and William Gifford Palgrave. 

Benjamin Braude 



66 • College of Arts & Sciences • Histom 



HS 311 The African Slave Trade (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

From antiquity to the late nineteenth century 
black Africans were sold as slaves to the far cor- 
ners of the world. This course examines the ori- 
gins of this nefarious trade with particular empha- 
sis on the trans- Atlantic slave trade that began in 
the sixteenth century. Topics include the eco- 
nomic, political, and moral dimensions of the 
trade, including ways in which slaves were ob- 
tained in Africa, their transport to the New 
World, the slave systems that were established 
there, and the campaign to end the trade in Afri- 
can slaves. The African slave trade is an excellent 
introduction to the changing geography, econom- 
ics, and ideas of the modern world. 

David Nortbrup 

HS 314 (FA 327) Early Medieval Art in Ireland 
and Britain (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094.' 

This seminar will examine the origins and 
development of art in Ireland and Britain in the 
Early Medieval period and the production of Irish 
and English missionaries on the Continent. Em- 
phasis will be placed on manuscripts, sculpture, 
and metal-work of the sixth to ninth century, on 
understanding works of art in their historical con- 
texts, and on their sources in the Celtic, Germanic 
and Mediterranean worlds. Students will work on 
individual research projects. Nancy Netzer 

HS 326 History of Modern Iran (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094.' 

The primary objective of this course is to pro- 
vide an analysis of the trends and transformations 
in the political, social and cultural history of Iran 
from the late nineteenth century to the present. 
Particular emphasis will be placed on the follow- 
ing topics: major structural changes in the Iranian 
economy and society in the latter part of the 1 9th 
century; social and religious movements in the 
19th century; the constitutional revolution of 
1905-191 1; the changing relations between Iran 
and the West; Iran's experience as a "moderniz- 
ing" state, 1925-1979; the cultural roots and the 
social-structural causes of the Iranian Revolution 
of 1 977-79; economic and political developments 
in Iran since the revolution; and Iran's current 
regional and international role. Ali Banuazizi 

HS 363 Modern India I: India Under the British 

(F:3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through 1 IS 094. 

The recent spate of popular films ("Gandhi," 
" \ Passage to India," "1 leaf and Dust") and tele- 
vision series ("The Jewel in the Crown") on In- 
dia prompted the Indian-born writer Salman 
Rushdie to comment on the phenomenon of the 
"revival of the Raj" in the West. This course will 
try to understand the implications of this renewed 
interest by starting with an exploration of the 
myth and the reality of the British Raj or rule in 
India. This course is designed as an historical sur- 
vey of British rule in India, from the take-over of 
India by the British Crown in 1858 to Indian in- 
dependence in 1947. We will look at British co- 
lonial policy as well as at various responses to 



colonial rule in India, such as the social and reli- 
gious reform movements, peasant and anti-caste 
movements, the women's movement and the na- 
tionalist movement. We will also focus on the 
alternative to the Raj offered by the Indian nation- 
alist movement which, especially under the lead- 
ership of M.K. Gandhi, had come to encompass 
the various other movements. Mrinalini Sinha 

HS 364 Modern India II: India After 
Independence (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

Although "India Under the British" is not a 
requirement for taking "India After Indepen- 
dence," the latter is a continuation of the former 
which deals with the period leading up to Indian 
independence in 1947. This course focuses on the 
modern developments in the Indian nation after 
1 947. It begins with an evaluation of the ideologi- 
cal foundations of the modern Indian state and its 
ability to deal with the many challenges to its le- 
gitimacy. In this context we will study the threats 
posed by various regional and secessionist move- 
ments, the resurgence of virulent communal or 
religious ideologies and the increase in violence 
against backward castes and groups and against 
women. We will also examine the vitality of sev- 
eral grass roots social movements in India, most 
notably Dalit (backward caste) and peasant move- 
ments which are addressing a wide range of issues 
from economic and political empowerment to 
gender, caste and environmental issues. 

Mrinalini Sinha 

HS 392 Immigration Since 1900 (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

An examination of "the new migration," 
1890-1927; exclusion; hyphenated Americans 
(1927-1945); post- World War II "100% Ameri- 
cans;" the 1960s black-ethnic turmoil; the new- 
est arrivals (Puerto Rican, Cuban, Mexican, Latin 
Americans, Southeast Asian), and the "undocu- 
mented" since the 1970s. Andrew Buni 

HS 394 The Age of Jackson (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094 

A study of the Jacksonian period of American 
History, with particular emphasis upon the way 
in which new political ideologies influenced 
changing patterns of thought in social, economic, 
and cultural affairs during the 1830s and 40s. 
Special consideration will be given to historical 
developments in New England and the North- 
east. Thomas H. O'Connor 

HS 399 The Gilded Age (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through I IS 094.' 

A survey of major political, social, economic, 
and cultural developments in the United States 
from 1877 to 1897. The course will focus on the 
aftereffects of national Reconstruction policy; the 
impact of industrialization and the philosophy of 
Big Business; the nature of literary and cultural 
standards during a period of conspicuous con- 
sumption; and the response of farmers, laborers, 
and immigrants that led to the Populist crusade. 

Thomas H. O'Connor 



HS 401 (TH 444) The Reformation (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course will explore the religious and so- 
cial history of the Protestant and Catholic Ref- 
ormations. We shall examine in detail the major 
theological and ecclesiological questions of the 
sixteenth century: How is a human being saved? 
What is the proper relationship between person 
and God? What is the status of earthly life in re- 
lation to eternal, heavenly life? How should hu- 
man beings organize their knowledge and wor- 
ship of God, their administration of the spiritual 
life? We shall consider these questions by focus- 
ing on the ideas and activities of Erasmus, Luther, 
Calvin, Ignatius Loyola, and Teresa of Avila. 
However, we shall also devote considerable atten- 
tion to the opinions and religious practices of the 
ordinary believer — Protestant and Catholic, fe- 
male and male, peasant and aristocrat. Thus the 
relationship between theology and religious ex- 
perience will be an important theme of the course. 
We will also consider in some depth the impact 
of the Reformation on local religious life. 

Virginia Reinburg 

HS 406 Irish Society, Culture and Women 

1 848-1 970 (F: 3) Margaret MacCurtain 

HS 418 (EN 500) Politics and Literature in 18th 
and 19th Century Ireland (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course will examine the relationship be- 
tween literature and politics in 18th and 19th cen- 
tury Ireland. Major works of Irish literature of this 
period will be considered in the light of their so- 
cial and political origins, their subsequent effect 
on political conceptualization and action, and 
their place in the development of the Irish liter- 
ary tradition. Among the writers to be considered 
are Swift, Merriman, Maria Edgeworth, William 
Carlton, Charles Kickham. This course is taught 
jointly with Professor Adele Dalsimer of the En- 
glish Department. Kevin O'Neill 

HS 421-422 Modern England (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

After a look at the medieval background, the 
course will deal with the period from 1485 to the 
present. Emphasis will be mainly on political and 
constitutional history, but with attention to social 
and intellectual developments as well, and also to 
the British Empire of the 19th-20th centuries and 
British influence on the world at large. 

Thomas W. Perry 

HS 441-442 Rise of Modern Germany (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A two-semester survey of the political, cul- 
tural, economic, and intellectual factors which 
comprise the so-called "German Problem." This 
course will provide the historical background for 
understanding the current dilemma of German 
re-unification. The first semester will concentrate 
on the developments from Napoleon's conquests 
to World War I, and will stress the search for 
unification. The second semester will begin with 
the Weimar Republic and continue through the 
Nazi Dictatorship up to contemporary develop- 
ments. John L. Heineman 



College of Arts & Sciences • History • 67 



HS 453 Russian History up to the Revolution (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A study of the major cultural and social devel- 
opments in Russia from the formation of the first 
Russian state to the Bolshevik Revolution of 1 9 1 7. 
Special emphasis will be placed upon recent re- 
search concerning select problems in the field of 
Russian history. Raymond McN ally 

HS 454 Twentieth-Century Russia (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A survey of Russian history from the 1 905 and 
1917 Revolutions to the present day, with an 
emphasis on the relation of social and political 
developments. Special attention will be paid to the 
Russian Revolution of 1917 and its causes, the 
NEP, the power struggle of the 1920s, women's 
liberation, the rise of Stalin, industrialization, 
collectivization, political terror, World War II, 
the Cold War, Khrushchev and de-Stalinization, 
the "normalcy" of the Brezhnev era, Gorbachev 
and Perestroika and the end of the Soviet period. 

Roberta Manning 

HS 462 High Middle Ages (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

The first half of this course will examine the 
reasons behind the appearance of a new and vital 
civilization in Europe during the twelfth century. 
This civilization was accompanied by the appear- 
ance of powerful feudal kingdoms, written gov- 
ernment, ordered legal systems, universities, and 
scholasticism. The second half of the course will 
explore the problems that arose because of these 
developments, in particular heresy, and-semitism, 
and aristocratic, popular, and communal revolts. 
Readings will include epics, romances, legal and 
commercial documents, crusader chronicles, a 
medieval auto-biography, and saints' lives. 

Robin Fleming 

HS 463 The End of the Ancient World: East and 
West (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

How was power acquired, lost, flaunted, and 
ultimately transformed in Late Antiquity? That 
is the focus of the course. Rome competed with a 
new imperial capital at Constantinople. Barbar- 
ian invaders settled in the West. New aristocra- 
cies competed with older ones. Power over the 
East was contested by Persians and Arabs. Holy 
men arose whose power sometimes equalled that 
of emperors and bishops. From the third to the 
eighth century, the Roman Empire broke apart, 
and was transformed in fundamental ways. The 
struggle for power, and its new manifestations is 
one way of looking at this transformation. 

Robin Fleming 
John Rosser 

HS 466 Europe 1871-1914 (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094.' 

This course will explore the development of 
Europe from the end of the Franco-Prussian War 
in 1871 to the outbreak ofWorld War I in 1914, 
years when Europe had attained a position of 
unparalleled prosperity and world domination, 
but which ended disastrously with its plunge into 



war in 1914. Particular emphasis will be given to 
the following themes: the political and diplomatic 
developments that first gave Europe one of its 
longest periods of peace, and then plunged it into 
its most disastrous war; the political progress that 
led to the apparent triumph of liberalism and 
democracy in most of Europe by 1914; the eco- 
nomic and technological progress that gave Eu- 
rope unprecedented prosperity, and the rise of 
European domination of the world. 

Alan Reinerman 

HS 467 Sixteenth-Century Catholicism (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This is a lecture course dealing with the phe- 
nomenon commonly known as the Catholic Ref- 
ormation. Topics will include lay confraternities, 
the new catechesis, Humanism and the reform of 
ministry, the Council of Trent, the new religious 
orders, Teresa of Avila, Carlo Borromeo. 

John O'Malley, S.J., Gasson Professor 

HS 468 Russian Intellectual History (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course is concerned with writings of signifi- 
cant Russian thinkers from the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries, in particular, the relationship 
among their ideas and concrete social, economic 
and political changes in Russia. Raymond McN ally 

HS 469 Intellectual History of Modern Europe 

(F:3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

This course traces the main contours and vari- 
ous nooks and crannies in the development of 
thought and culture in Western Europe from the 
Age of the French Revolution to the present day. 
It examines the 19th century, moving from the 
decades (1800-1848) marked by idealist philoso- 
phies, romantic aesthetics and Utopian social theo- 
ries, to the triumph of positivism and the new 
religion of science between 1850 and the 1880s, 
and ending with the emergent crisis of Western 
culture at the century's close. Readings will in- 
clude works by Hegel, Schopenhauer, George 
Sand, Flaubert, Mill, Nietzsche, Engels, Gustav 
LeBon, Oscar Wilde and Andre Gide. 

Paul Breines 

HS 470 Intellectual History of Modern Europe 

(S:3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

Although HS 469 is not a requirement for tak- 
ing HS 470, the latter is a continuation of the 
former, which deals with the 19th century. This 
course focuses on the 20th. It begins with the 
cultural crises and transformations of the turn of 
the last century, especially the works of Freud, 
Einstein, and the Cubists, viewing these as the soil 
for the growth of what is now called post-mod- 
ernism. It traces developments through World 
War I and its impact through the politicization 
of intellectuals in the 1920s and '30s, World War 
II, genocide, post-war affluence and anti-colonial- 
ism, to the 1960s upheavals and the subsequent 
emergence of post-modernist ways of experienc- 
ing. Attention is given to the formation of sub- 
cultures around the artistic avant-garde, the po- 
litical "ultra-left," and gay and lesbian life in Eu- 
rope. Paul Breines 



HS 488 The French Revolution (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094.' 

A social and political history of France dur- 
ing the turbulent decade, 1789 to 1799. The 
course will consider the origins of the Revolution, 
the reconstruction of France by the National As- 
sembly, the failure to regain stability in 1791-92, 
the rise of the radical Jacobins and the Reign of 
Terror, the Thermidorian Reaction, the winding 
down of the Revolution, and the rise of Napoleon 
Bonaparte. It will conclude with an examination 
of the consequences of these events. 

Paul Sptignoli 

HS 500 International Studies: Humanities 
Seminar (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A cross-cultural and interdisciplinary over- 
view of how language and literature, religion and 
ideology, history and the fine arts shape human 
interaction across political and national bound- 
aries. The course is intended as the coordinating 
seminar for students minoring in International 
Studies who are interested in topics that are pri- 
marily non-governmental and non-economic. 
During the first part of the course patterns of glo- 
bal humanistic communication and interaction 
will be introduced in readings, lectures, and dis- 
cussions. In the second half students will prepare 
and present research papers on some aspects of 
cross-cultural humanistic studies. 

David Northrup 

HS 501 Roots of Revolution: Central America 

(S:3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

The peoples of Central America have faced 
difficult revolutionary conflicts in recent decades. 
The nations of the region share common histori- 
cal experiences from Spanish colonialism to twen- 
tieth-century U.S. economic expansion and po- 
litical intervention. Yet the nations of Central 
America remain very diverse. National political 
systems vary, economic histories differ across re- 
gions within small nations, and sharp cultural di- 
versities persist. This course explores compara- 
tively the histories of Guatemala, El Salvador, and 
Nicaragua seeking an understanding of the ori- 
gins of their diverse yet simultaneous revolution- 
ary conflicts. John Tutino 

HS 503 The Civil War (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094.' 

An analysis of the Civil War in the United 
States from 1845 to 1877 in terms of the back- 
ground and causes of the conflict, the principal 
military theaters of operation, and the main events 
of the Reconstruction period that followed the 
war. Thomas H. O'Connor 

HS 516 American Revolution (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094.' 

This course will analyze the political, social, 
and economic causes and consequences of the 
American Revolution. It is a course intended pri- 
marily for advanced history majors and graduate 
students. Alan Rogers 



68 • College of Arts & Sciences • Honors Proorwi 



HS 537 The United States Since 1929 (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094.' 

This course is designed for history majors and 
others interested in the significant political, eco- 
nomic and social developments in the United 
States over the past half-century. The course will 
focus mainly on domestic affairs, but one of the 
themes will be the increasing role the United 
States played in world politics during this period. 
Among the topics to be covered are: the Great 
Depression; Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New 
Deal; World War II; the Cold War; the Red 
Scare; the civil rights movement; student protest 
in the 1960s; the struggle for sexual equality; 
Johnson, Nixon, Vietnam and the problem of the 
modern presidency; the contemporary crisis in the 
American economy and Reaganomics. One of the 
issues we will be examining throughout the course 
is the ability of American liberalism to meet our 
society's problems and its efforts to adapt to 
changing conditions. Mark Gelfand 

HS 545-546 American Ideas and Institutions 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A history of thought as it has developed within 
the framework of American society. The course 
will compare ideas of several distinct kinds: those 
which have expressed the prevailing ways of each 
period; those which have offered alternatives; and 
those which have sought artistically to mirror 
dreams and realities. Alan Lawson 

HS 549-550 U.S. Military History (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

The military tradition in the United States is 
older than the country itself. Out of this tradition 
grow many of the ideas and assumptions which 



still shape current military policy. This course will 
examine the military history, both in war and in 
peace, and the attitudes to which it gave shape, 
particularly emphasizing military leaders, institu- 
tional developments, and the social and political 
context in the years between 1607 and 1991. 

Carol M. Petillo 

HS 575 Concerrworks in Europe and the United 
States, 1930-1945 (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

A survey of major works, most musical, cre- 
ated during the crisis years of the Great Depres- 
sion and of World War II. The course will be built 
around compositions by Shostakovitch, 
Prokofiev, Bartok, Kodaly, Orff, Weill, Ravel, 
Stravinsky, Britten, Gershwin, Ellington, Basie, 
Holiday, Copland, Bernstein. Some of the ways 
in which the often traumatic experiences of the 
period may have affected cultural activity will be 
one of the central concerns of the course. Since 
many of the compositions were presented in col- 
laborative productions, contributions by direc- 
tors, choreographers, designers of stage and film 
productions, and others will be included in the 
course as subordinate topics. Each student will put 
together a collection of "images" from the period 
(on paper, in a sequence of slides, in a computer 
presentation, or in some other suitable format to 
be worked out in cooperation with the professor) 
corresponding "appropriately" to the "content" 
of one of the musical works and/or to the "con- 
text" in which it was composed. Scott Van Doren 

HS 691-692 Honors Project (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

Proposals should be submitted, accompanied 
by a supporting letter from the directing faculty 
member, to the Chairman of the departmental 



Honors Committee no later than April 1st. All 
proposals for honors projects must be approved 
by that committee. The Department 

HS 694 Honors Thesis (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

Students who have the approval of the Depart- 
ment to enroll in a special honors project will 
carry this course as the credit vehicle for the pa- 
per produced in that project. This course is open 
only to students who have been given approval to 
enroll in an honors project (HS 691-692). 

The Department 

HS 695-696 Scholar of the College Project 
(F: 6-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

Proposals for possible designation as scholar's 
projects should be submitted to the Director of 
Undergraduate Studies early in the spring. De- 
tails of dates and required materials are available 
either from the Director's office or from the of- 
fice of the Dean of Arts and Sciences. All propos- 
als must be approved by the Director and the 
Departmental honors committee. 

The Department 

HS 698 Scholar of the College Thesis (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 
through HS 094. 

Students who are enrolled in an approved 
Scholar of the College Project (HS 695-696) will 
carry this course as the credit vehicle for the final 
thesis submitted to the Department in comple- 
tion of that project. This course is open only to 
students who have been designated as candidates 
for the title of Scholar of the College. 

The Department 



Honors Program 



Director: Joseph Appleyard, S.J., Gasson 102 

HP 001-004; 031-034 Western Cultural 
Tradition l-VIII (F: 6-S: 6) 

All students in the Honors Program are required 
to take Cultural Tradition I-IV (HP 001 -HP 004) 
as freshmen and Cultural Tradition V-VIII (HP 
031-034) as sophomores. These are two three- 
credit courses each semester (a total of 24 cred- 
its;, and they substitute for the normal Core re- 
quirements in Theology, Philosophy, English, 
and (for non-majors) Social Science. They are 
open only to students (about nine percent of the 
freshman class in A&S) who have been selected 
by the director in collaboration with the Office 
of Admission. All have been contacted by letter 
during the summer with instructions on registra- 
tion. 



Advanced Honors Seminars 1992-93 

HP 103 Women, 20th-century Theory, and the 
Western Cultural Tradition (S: 3) Mary Joe Hughes 

HP 109 Dostoevsky (S: 3) Richard Hughes 

HP 1 10 Literature and Medicine: The Human 
Experience (F: 3) Helle Mathiasen 

Joseph Alpert 

HP 116 Political Literature and Cinema (F: 3) 

John Michalczyk 

HP 1 18 The Closing of the American Mind (F: 3) 

David Borwinik 

HP 123 Reconsidering the Canon: Structuralist 
Theory, Totalitarian Practice, and the Central 
European Response (F: 3) Mark O'Connor 

I IP 124 Conscience and Christendom (F: 3) 

Francis Sullivan SJ. 

HP 125 Reading Joyce (S: 3) Joseph Appleyard, S.J. 

I IP 127 Autobiographical Literature (S: 3) 

Susan Michalczyk 

IIP 1 28 Bureaucracy and Western Cultural 
Tradition (F: 3) John Joseph Burns 

I IP 129 Law, Medicine, Ethics (S: i)John Paris, S.J. 
HP 1 30 Musical Thinking (S: 3) Peter Kugel 



NOTE: Normally H.P. seminars are restricted 
to students in the Honors Program. Other stu- 
dents interested in taking these courses should see 
the Director for permission. 
HP 199 Readings and Research (F, S: 3) 
HP 299 Senior Honors Thesis (F: 3-S: 3) 
HP 399 Scholar of the College (F: 6-S: 6) 



College of Arts & Sciences • Mathematics 



69 



Linguistics 



The description of the major program in General 
Linguistics appears under the Department of Slavic 
and Eastern Languages. 



Mathematics 



FACULTY 

Jenny A. Baglivo, Professor; B.A., Fordham 
University, MA., M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse Uni- 
versity 

Gerald G. Bilodeau, Professor; A.B., University 
of Maine; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Richard L. Faber, Professor; B.S., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology; A.M., Ph.D., 
Brandeis University 

Margaret J. Kenney, Professor; B.S., M.A. Bos- 
ton College; Ph.D., Boston University 

John H. Smith, Professor; A.B., Cornell Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Joseph A. Sullivan, Professor; A.B., Boston 
College; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Paul R. Thie, Professor; B.S., Canisius College; 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Robert J. Bond, Associate Professor; A.B., Bos- 
ton College; Ph.D., Brown University 

Daniel W. Chambers, Associate Professor; A.M., 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Richard A. Jenson, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Dartmouth College; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois at Chicago Circle 

William J. Keane, Associate Professor; A.B., Bos- 
ton College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Notre 
Dame 

Gerard E. Keough, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Boston College; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Charles Landraitis, Associate Professor, Chair- 
person of the Department; A.B., Wesleyan Uni- 
versity; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., 
Ph.D., Dartmouth College 

Harvey R. Margolis, Associate Professor; M.S., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Rennie Mirollo, Associate Professor; B.A., Co- 
lumbia College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Nancy E. Rallis, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana Univer- 
sity 

Ned I. Rosen, Associate Professor; B.S., Tufts 
University; M.A, Ph.D., University of Michi- 
gan 

John P. Shanahan, Associate Professor; B.S., 
M.S., University College, Galway; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University 



Robert H. Gross, Assistant Professor; A.B., 
Princeton University; Ph.D., Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology 

Joseph F. Krebs, Assistant Professor; A.B., 
A.M., Boston College 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The mathematics program for majors is designed 
to provide a solid foundation in the main areas of 
mathematics and mathematical applications. 
Course work is offered in preparation for careers 
in mathematics as well as for graduate study in 
pure and applied mathematics, computer science, 
operations research, and quantitative business 
management. 

The following courses or their equivalents are 
required for the major: MT 063, Mathematical 
Analysis and the Computer; MT 102-103, Cal- 
culus (Math/Science Majors) I, II; MT 202-203, 
Multivariate Calculus I, II; MT 216-217, Ab- 
stract and Linear Algebra I, II; MT 302, Intro- 
duction to Analysis; and three MT electives num- 
bered between 400 and 499 or above 800. At least 
one of the following must be included in the three 
electives: MT 430, MT 435, MT 445, MT 451, 
MT 816, MT 840, MT 860. A grade point aver- 
age of at least 1.667 is required for courses ful- 
filling the major. 

MT063 andMT 102-103 are normally taken 
in the freshman year, MT 202-203 in the sopho- 
more year, and MT 302 in the junior year. MT 
2 1 6-2 1 7 is normally taken in the sophomore year. 
Well-prepared students can omit some of these 
courses and be placed direcdy into more advanced 
courses upon the recommendation of the Chair- 
person. However, students placing out of the first 
calculus course are required to substitute MT 
electives (between 400 and 499, or above 800) for 
the omitted course(s). 

Generally, majors take more mathematics 
courses than the minimum required for the ma- 
jor. The Department also strongly recommends 
that its majors take courses in Physics or in some 
other area that uses a substandal amount of math- 
ematics and is outside of the Department of Math- 
ematics. 

The Department offers to qualified students 
the opportunity to graduate with Departmental 
Honors. For this a student must: (a) complete 
succesfully MT 312-3 13, MT 316-317; (b) com- 
plete successfully at least six other courses at the 
level of 400 or above including at least one two- 
semester course from among MT 814-815, MT 



816-817, MT 840-841, or MT 860-861, and at 
least one elective from among MT 430, MT 435, 
MT445, MT 451, MT 816, MT 840, MT 860; 
at least three of the six electives must be non-com- 
puter courses; i.e. not among the courses MT 
500-599; (c) maintain at least a B average in the 
courses listed in (a) and (b); (d) complete the 
Honors Seminar, MT 694-695, in the senior year. 

Departmental Honors 

The Department offers to qualified students the 
opportunity to graduate with Departmental Hon- 
ors. For this a student must: (a) complete success- 
fully MT 312-313, MT 316-317; (b) complete 
successfully at least six other courses at the level 
of 400 or above including at least one two-semes- 
ter course from among MT 814-815, MT 816- 
817, MT 840-841, or MT 860-861, and at least 
one elective from among MT 430, MT 435, MT 
445 , MT 45 1 , MT 8 1 6, MT 840, MT 860; at least 
three of the six electives must be non-computer 
courses ( i.e., not among the courses MT 500- 
599) (c) maintain at least a B average in the courses 
listed in (a) and (b); (d) complete the Honors 
Seminar, MT 694-695, in the senior year. 

Core and Service Courses 

The Mathematics Department offers various ser- 
vice courses to meet special needs. In particular, 
there are course sequences in mathematics de- 
signed for science majors (MT 102, 103, 202, 
305), for biology majors and pre-medical students 
(MT 100-101, 200-201), for Carroll School of 
Management students (MT 172-173), and for 
School of Education students (MT 190-191, 290, 
291). All of these courses satisfy Core require- 
ments for students in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences. Students in other schools should familiar- 
ize themselves with the Core requirements of 
these schools before electing courses in math- 
ematics. 

Other Core courses are offered for students 
with less specialized needs. Courses such at MT 
004-005, Finite Mathematics, MT 006-007, 
Ideas in Mathematics, MT 008, Introduction to 
Computers and Programming, and MT 014-015, 
Calculus for the Non-Science Major, are designed 
especially for humanities and social science ma- 
jors, and for School of Education students seek- 
ing to develop a broad background in mathemat- 
ics. 

There are several introductory' calculus 
courses and course sequences: MT 014-01 5, MT 
100-101, MT 1 10-1 1 1, MT 173, MT 184, MT 
102-103, and MT 1 12-1 1 3 . They vary in content 
and purpose. Some are targeted at specific groups 
of students. A selection should be based on a read- 



70 • College of Arts & Sciences • Mathematics 



ing of the course descriptions and the mathemat- 
ics requirements of the student's intended pro- 
gram of study. In some cases the student will take 
MT 010, Pre-Calculus Mathematics, before un- 
dertaking a calculus sequence. However, most 
students will be able to proceed directly to a cal- 
culus sequence. 

After completing any course or course se- 
quence numbered below MT 200, additional 
courses should generally be selected from those 
numbered above MT 200. Students are advised 
to obtain approval at the Mathematics Office, 
Carney 318, before departing from this rule, since 
credit toward graduation cannot be granted for 
any mathematics course overlapping substantially 
with one previously completed. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

MT 004-005 Introduction to Finite Mathematics 
I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course sequence is for students in the hu- 
manities, social sciences, and the School of Edu- 
cation. The objective is to expose the student to 
mathematical ways of thinking and to the relation 
of mathematics to real world problems. Topics 
include set theory, finite probability theory, vec- 
tors and matrices, linear programming, and 
Markov chains. 

MT 006-007 Ideas in Mathematics I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course sequence is for students in the hu- 
manities, social sciences and the School of Edu- 
cation. It is designed to introduce the student to 
the spirit of mathematics, its beauty and vitality, 
and to challenge him or her to do mathematics. 
Topics vary, but may be chosen from elementary 
number theory', geometry, and graph theory. 

MT 008 Introduction to Computers and 
Programming (F, S: 3) 

This course is for students in the humanities and 
social sciences. The student will learn how to pro- 
gram at an elementary level using the BASIC lan- 
guage. Through use of the language, the student 
will be led to an appreciation of the power and 
versatility of the computer as a general problem 
solving tool. In addition, some of the following 
topics will be discussed: history of the computer, 
computer organization, representation and stor- 
age of data, peripheral devices, files, other pro- 
gramming languages. 

MT 010 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (F, S: 3) 

I his is a one-semester course designed for stu- 
dents who wish to take an introductory calculus 
course, particularly MT lOOorMT 173, but have 
an inadequate background in high school math- 
ematics. Other students should proceed directly 
to the appropriate calculus course. Topics include 
functions and graphs, exponential and logarith- 
mic functions, and trigonometry. 

MT 014-015 Calculus (Non-Science Majors) I, II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

1 his course sequence is for students in the hu- 
manities, the social sciences and the School of 
Education. It includes a discussion of standard 
topics m differential and integral calculus. The 
treatment of the derivative includes the differen- 
tiation of algebraic and transcendental functions 
along with applications. The study of the integral 
includes a brief survey of methods of integration 



together with applications. A short discussion of 
analytic geometrv is included where required. 
The approach is informal and concrete rather 
than rigorous and theoretical. 

Students with a strong secondary school back- 
ground or who may wish to take additional 
courses in mathematics should consider MT 100 
or MT 1 10 instead of MT 014. MT 014 is not 
open to students who have completed a calculus 
course at the college level. 

MT 063 Mathematical Analysis and the 

Computer (S: 3) 

This course is open only to mathematics majors. 

This course is intended to give the student an 
introduction to computers and programming and 
to demonstrate the use of the computer in solv- 
ing mathematical problems. In addition, it is in- 
tended to enhance and supplement the calculus 
courses for mathematics majors by using the com- 
puter to illustrate theoretical concepts and to 
present additional theory and applications. 
Theory and applications will involve areas se- 
lected from the following: numerical calculus, 
number theory, discrete mathematics, computer 
science, and probability theory. 

MT 100-101 Calculus I, II (F, S: 3-F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Trigonometry 

This is a course in the calculus of one variable 
intended for biology, economics, and premedical 
students, but open to all who are qualified. Stu- 
dents who have completed a year course in cal- 
culus at the secondary level should consider the 
accelerated version of this course, MT 1 10-1 1 1. 
Topics covered include limits, derivatives, inte- 
grals, transcendental functions, techniques of in- 
tegration, and applications. MT 100 is not open 
to students who have completed a calculus course 
at the college level. 

MT 102-103 Calculus (Math/Science Majors) I, 
II (F: 4-S: 4) 

This course sequence is for students majoring in 
mathematics, chemistry, geology, geophysics, 
computer science, or physics. Topics covered in- 
clude the algebraic and analytic properties of the 
real number system, functions, limits, derivatives, 
integrals, applications of the derivative and inte- 
gral and sequences and series. MT 1 02 is not open 
to students who have completed a calculus course 
at the college level. 

MT 1 10-1 1 1 Calculus/Accelerated (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is an accelerated version of MT 
100-101, and is designed for students who have 
had the equivalent of a one-year course in Calcu- 
lus in secondary school. Topics include those 
listed for Calculus I and II plus sequences and 
series and conic sections. MT 1 10 is not open to 
students who have completed a calculus course at 
the college level. 

MT 1 72 Finite Mathematics for Management 
Sciences (F, S: 3) 

A survey of applied finite mathematical techniques 
useful for management students. Topics include 
rules of summation, linear systems and inequali- 
ties, linear programming (graphical solution), 
mathematics of finance, set theory and counting, 
elementary probability theory, and the applica- 
tions of these topics in business and economics. 
Not open to students who have completed MT 
005. 



MT 1 73 Calculus for Management Sciences 
(F, S: 3) 

A survey of one-variable calculus, primarily for 
students in the School of Management. Topics 
include differentiation of elementary, exponential, 
and logarithmic functions, curve sketching, ap- 
plied optimization, and integration. Applications 
to business and economics will be stressed. Stu- 
dents who may wish to go on in calculus should 
elect another course. MT 173 is not open to stu- 
dents who have completed a calculus course at the 
college level. 

MT 1 82 Finite Mathematics for Management 
Sciences (Honors) 

This course is an honors version of MT 172. 
Topics covered are the same as in MT 172, but 
the material is covered in more depth. Not open 
to students who have completed MT 005. Not 
offered 1992-93 

MT 1 84 Calculus for Management Sciences/ 
Accelerated 

This course is an accelerated version of Calculus 
for Management Sciences, MT 173, and is de- 
signed for students who have had the equivalent 
of a one-year course in calculus in secondary 
school. The calculus of functions of one variable 
is thoroughly reviewed in one semester. Not open 
to students who have completed a calculus course 
at the college level. Not offered 1992-93 

MT 190-191 Mathematics for Teachers I, II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course has been designed for those who plan 
to teach mathematics in grades K-9. The empha- 
sis is on the content of mathematics in the emerg- 
ing K-9 curriculum and its interface with current 
major issues in mathematics education-problem 
solving and technology. Topics to be covered 
include the real number system-with motivational 
activities and applications, functions and their 
graphs, problem solving with calculators and 
computers, and elements of probability and sta- 
tistics. 

MT 200-201 Intermediate Calculus I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 100-101 

This course sequence is a continuation of MT 
1 00- 101. Topics include vectors and analytic ge- 
ometry of three dimensions, partial differentiation 
and multiple integration with applications, infi- 
nite series, and an introduction to differential 
equations. 

MT 202 Multivariate Calculus I (F, S: 4) 

Prerequisite: MT 102-103 or MT 1 10-1 1 1 

This course is a continuation ofMT 102-103 
or MT 1 10-1 1 1 for those students majoring in 
mathematics, chemistry, geology, geophysics or 
physics. Topics include vectors in two and three 
dimensions, analytic geometry of three dimen- 
sions, curves and surfaces, partial derivatives and 
multiple integrals. 

MT 203 Multivariate Calculus II (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 202 or MT 1 1 3 

This course is a continuation of MT 202 for 
mathematics majors. Topics include the calculus 
of vector fields, line and surface integrals, differ- 
ential equations and additional topics as time per- 
mits. 



College of Arts & Sciences • Ma 1 1 n \i vncs • 71 



MT 2 1 5 Elementary Linear Algebra 

This course is designed to satisfy the needs of stu- 
dents wanting an elementary introduction to 
matrix theory and linear algebra. This includes 
students in the natural sciences, social sciences, 
and the Carroll School of Management. Topics 
include matrices, vector spaces, determinants, lin- 
ear equations and applications. There are no pre- 
requisites although some college level mathemat- 
ics is desirable. Not offered 1992-93 

MT 216-217 Abstract and Linear Algebra I, II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is designed to develop the student's 
ability to do abstract mathematics through the 
presentation and development of the basic notions 
of algebraic structures and linear algebra. Topics 
include logic, sets, mappings, the integers, rings, 
fields, vector spaces, basis and dimension, systems 
of linear equations, linear transformations, matri- 
ces, eigenvalues and inner product spaces. 

MT 243 Foundations of Discrete Mathematics 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: One year of college mathematics. 

This course introduces students to the funda- 
mental notions of discrete mathematics. The ru- 
diments of set theory and mathematical reason- 
ing will be studied and the student will become 
conversant with both the language and methods 
of proof employed in discrete mathematics. Math- 
ematical structures to be covered include 
orderings, matrices, and Boolean algebras. 

MT 244 Discrete Structures and Applications 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: MT 243 or MT 216 

The objective of this course is to develop pro- 
ficiency in solving discrete mathematics problems 
in the areas of enumeration, finite probability, and 
graph theory. Topics include permutations, com- 
binations, counting methods such as the pigeon- 
hole principle and the inclusion-exclusion prin- 
ciple, finite probability theory, graph theory, and 
possibly recurrence relations and generating func- 
tions. 

MT 290 Number Theory for Teachers (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 090-091 

This course is intended to focus on the wealth 
of topics that relate specifically to the natural 
numbers. These will be treated as motivational 
problems to be used in an activity-oriented ap- 
proach to mathematics in grades K-9. The course 
will demonstrate effective ways to use the calcu- 
lator and computer in mathematics education. 
Topics include prime number facts and conjec- 
tures, magic squares, Pascal's triangle, Fibonacci 
numbers, modular arithmetic and mathematical 
art. 

MT 291 Geometry for Teachers (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 090-091 

This course is intended to fill a basic need of 
all teachers of grades K-9. Geometry now occu- 
pies a significant role in the elementary math- 
ematics curriculum. The course will treat content 
but ideas for presenting geometry as an activity- 
based program will be stressed. Topics to be cov- 
ered include the geoboard and other key 
manipulatives, elements of motion and Euclidean 
geometry, and suggestions for using Logo as a 
tool to enhance teaching geometry. 



MT 302 Introduction to Analysis (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: MT 203 and either MT 2 16 or MT 
316 

The purpose of this course is to give students 
the theoretical foundations for the topics taught 
inMT 102-103. It will cover algebraic and order 
properties of the real numbers, least upper bound 
axiom, limits, continuity, differentiation, the Ri- 
emann integral, sequences and series. Definitions 
and proofs will be stressed throughout the course. 

MT 305 Advanced Calculus (Science Majors) (S: 4) 

Prerequisite: MT 201 or MT 202 

Topics include: linear second order differen- 
tial equations, series solutions of differential equa- 
tions including Bessel functions and Legendre 
polynomials, solutions of the diffusion and wave 
equations in several dimensions, the basic prop- 
erties of the Laplace transform with applications. 

MT 312-313 Introduction to Analysis (Honors) 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: MT 203 and MT 316 

This course is a two-semester honors version 
of MT 302. It will cover the same topics as MT 
302 but in more depth and will also cover addi- 
tional topics in the second semester such as met- 
ric spaces and the Lebesgue integral. 

MT 316-317 Abstract and Linear Algebra 
(Honors) I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is a two-semester honors version of 
MT 216-217, with similar content. 

MT 410 Differential Equations (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Linear Algebra and MT 203 

This course is a junior-senior elective in- 
tended primarily for the general student who is 
interested in seeing applications of mathematics. 
Among the topics covered will be: first order lin- 
ear equations, second order linear equations, gen- 
eral nth order equations with constant coeffi- 
cients, series solutions, special functions. 

MT 414 Numerical Analysis (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 201 or MT 203, and a program- 
ming course, such as MT 063, MT 550 or MC 
140 

Topics include the solution of linear and non- 
linear algebraic equations, interpolation, numeri- 
cal differentiation and integration, numerical so- 
lution of ordinary differential equations, approxi- 
mation theory. 

MT 420 Probability and Statistics (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 201 or MT 202 

This course is introductory but assumes a cal- 
culus background. It is open to any mathematics 
or science major who has not taken MT 426. Its 
purpose is to provide an overview of the basic 
concepts of probability and statistics and their 
applications. Topics include probability functions 
over discrete and continuous sample spaces, in- 
dependence and conditional probabilities, ran- 
dom variables and their distributions, sampling 
theory, the central limit theorem, expectation, 
confidence intervals and estimation, hypothesis 
testing. 

MT 426 Probability (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 202 

A general introduction to modern probabil- 
ity theory. Topics studied include probability 
spaces, distributions of functions of random vari- 



ables, weak law of large numbers, central limit 
theorems and conditional distributions. 

MT 427 Mathematical Statistics (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 426 

Topics studied include: sampling distribu- 
tions, introduction to decision theory, paramet- 
ric point and interval estimation, hypothesis test- 
ing and introduction to Bayesian statistics. 

MT 430 Introduction to Number Theory (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 2 1 6-2 1 7 

Topics covered include divisibility, unique- 
factorization, congruences, number-theoretic 
functions, primitive roots, diophantine equations, 
continued fractions, quadratic residues, and the 
distribution of primes. An attempt will be made 
to provide historical background for various prob- 
lems and also to provide examples useful in the 
secondary school curriculum. 

MT 435-436 Mathematical Programming I, II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

By providing an introduction to the theory, tech- 
niques, and applications of mathematical pro- 
gramming, this course demonstrates how math- 
ematical theory can be developed and applied to 
solve problems from management, economics, 
and the social sciences. Topics studied from lin- 
ear programming include a general discussion of 
linear optimization models, the theory and devel- 
opment of the simplex algorithm, degeneracy, 
duality, sensitivity analysis, and the dual simplex 
algorithm. Integer programming problems, and 
the transportation and assignment problems are 
considered, and algorithms are developed for their 
resolution. 

Other topics are drawn from game theory, 
dynamic programming, Markov decision pro- 
cesses (with finite and infinite horizons), network 
analysis, and nonlinear programming. 

MT 445 Applied Combinatorics (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: A year of calculus and a course in 
linear algebra, abstract algebra or multivariable 
calculus. 

This course introduces graph theory and enu- 
meration theory with an emphasis on problem- 
solving. Topics include graphs, trees, counting 
methods for arrangements and selections, inclu- 
sion-exclusion, generating functions and recur- 
rence relations. Representative applications to 
other areas, such as geometry, probability, com- 
puter science, operations research and recre- 
ational mathematics will be included. One or 
more additional topics may be introduced as time 
permits. Not open to students who have com- 
pleted MT 244. 

MT 451 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: MT 201 or MT 202, or the equiva- 
lent. 

This course surveys the history and founda- 
tions of geometry from ancient to modern times. 
Topics will be selected from among the follow- 
ing: Mesopotamian and Egyptian mathematics, 
Greek geometry, the axiomatic method, historj 
of the parallel postulate, the Lobachevskian plane, 
Hilbert's axioms for Euclidean geometry, ellip- 
tic and projective geometry, the trigonometric 
formulas, models, geometry and the study of 
physical space. 



72 • College of Arts & Sciences •Mathematics 



MT 452 Differential Geometry and Relativity 

Prerequisite: MT 203 and MT 2 1 5 or MT 2 1 7, or 
the equivalent 

An introduction to the differential geometry 
of surfaces and to the special and general theory 
of relati\'ity. Topics include curves in the plane 
and 3-space, the first and second fundamental 
forms of a surface, curvature, geodesies, Rieman- 
nian manifolds, inertial reference frames, the 
postulates of relativity, relativity of simultaneity, 
Lorentz geometry, the equivalence principle, 
gravity as spacetime curvature, the field equations, 
the Schwartzschild solutions, the consequences of 
Einstein's theory. Not offered 1992-93 

MT 470 Mathematical Modeling (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: MT 202, MT 2 1 7 

Mathematical Modeling is the process of ap- 
plying mathematical techniques to resolve prac- 
tical problems. Steps involved include 1) the iden- 
tification of a particular problem; 2) the making 
of assumptions and the collection of data; 3) the 
formulation of a specific mathematical problem; 
4) the resolution of the problem; and 5) the trans- 
lation of this solution into a practical course of 
action. Model construction and its various com- 
ponents will be demonstrated by means of ex- 
amples and exercises and students will be actively 
engaged in the modeling process through indi- 
vidual and group projects. Special modeling tech- 
niques as, for example, curve fitting, dimension 
analysis, and simulation, will be discussed along 
with important model types such as optimization 
problems, queues, and interactive dynamic sys- 
tems. 

MT 480 Mathematics Seminar (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 2 1 7 or permission of the instruc- 
tor. 

Topics of this one-semester seminar course vary 
from year to year according to the interests of 
faculty and students. With department permission 
it may be repeated. Topic for fall, 1992: dynami- 
cal systems. 

MT 490 Reading and Research in Algebra (F, S: 3) 

MT 49 1 Reading and Research in Analysis ( F, S: 3 ) 

MT 492 Reading and Research in Geometry (F, S: 3) 

MT 493 Reading and Research in Number 
Theory (F, S: 3) 

MT 494 Reading and Research in Operations 
Research (F, S: 3) 

MT 495 Reading and Research in Probability/ 
Statistics (F, S: 3) 

MT 496 Reading and Research in Topology (F, S: 3) 

MT 499 Reading and Research (F, S: 3) 

A reading and research course is open to a student 
on the recommendation of a member of the fac- 
ulty and with the approval of the Chairperson or 
Assistant Chairperson. The student will work in- 
dependently in some advanced or special area of 
mathematics under the guidance of a faculty 
member. 



MT 550 (MC 140) Computer Science I (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Some computer experience, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

This course is an introduction to the art and 
science of computer programming and to some 
of the fundamental concepts of computer science. 
Students will write programs in the language Pas- 
cal; good program design methodology will be 
stressed throughout. There will also be study of 
some basic notions of computer science, includ- 
ing computer systems organization, files, and 
some algorithms of fundamental importance. 

MT 551 (MC 141) Computer Science II (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science I. 

In this course, students will write programs 
which employ more sophisticated and efficient 
means of representing and manipulating informa- 
tion. Part of the course is devoted to a continued 
study of programming, in particular the use of 
linked storage and recursive subprograms. The 
principle emphasis, however, is on the study of the 
fundamental data structures of computer science 
(lists, stacks, queues, trees, etc.), in terms of both 
their abstract properties and their implementa- 
tions in computer programs, and the study of fun- 
damental algorithms for manipulating these struc- 
tures. 

MT 566 Programming Languages 

Prerequisites: MT 551 orMC 141 

The course will focus on the essential concepts 
which are common to modern programming lan- 
guages and the run-time behavior of programs 
written in such languages. By understanding these 
concepts and their implementations in the differ- 
ent languages the student will be able to evaluate 
the advantages and disadvantages of a language for 
a given application. Strong programming skills 
are required. Offered in alternate years. Not offered 
1992-93 

MT 568 Computer Graphics 

Prerequisites: One year of college mathematics and 
MT551 orMC 141 

Computer graphics involves human-com- 
puter communication based on visual rather than 
textual representation. This course presents a 
broad introduction, with emphasis on software 
and interactive graphics. Topics include applica- 
tion programming, architecture of graphics sys- 
tems, geometric algorithms, (such as clipping, 
transformations, and scan conversion), graphical 
input, and geometric modeling. If there is time, 
three-dimensional graphics will be introduced. 
Programming projects are in Pascal. Offered in 
alternate years. Not offered 1992-93 

MT 572 (MC 260) Computer Organization and 
Assembly Language (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science II 

This course is a study of the organization of 
computers at the "low level" of the processing of 
machine instructions. Topics include the organi- 
zation of the CPU and memory, computer rep- 
resentation of numbers, the instruction execution 
cycle, traps and interrupts, implementations of 
arithmetic operations, complex data structures, 



and subroutine linkage, and the functioning of 
assemblers and linkers. Students will write pro- 
grams in the assembly language of a particular 
computer. 

MT 577 Microcomputer Systems 

Prerequisite: MT 572 or MC 260, or permission 
of instructor 

This course is designed to investigate the 
complete programming environment of a micro- 
computer. Topics to be covered will be chosen 
depending on available hardware, but will nor- 
mally include study of the following: a particular 
microcomputer operating system; memory man- 
agement; microprocessor access to various I/O, 
graphics, and support chips; the construction of 
a disk operating system; and comparative evalua- 
tion of other microcomputer systems. Not offered 
1992-93 

MT 583 Algorithms (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science II, and either 
Discrete Mathematics, MT 420, MT 426, or MT 
445. 

This course is a study of algorithms for, 
among other things, sorting, searching, pattern 
matching, and manipulation of graphs and trees. 
Emphasis is placed on the mathematical analysis 
of the time and memory requirements of such 
algorithms and on general techniques for improv- 
ing their performance. 

MT 585 Theory of Computation (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science II, and either 
Discrete Mathematics, MT 420, MT 426, or MT 
445. 

This course is an introduction to the theoreti- 
cal foundations of computing, through the study 
of mathematical models of computing machines 
and computational problems. Topics include 
finite-state automata, context-free languages, 
Turing machines, undecidable problems, and 
computational complexity. 

MT 599 Reading and Research in Computer 
Science (F, S: 3) 

MT 694-695 Honors Seminar I, II (F: 1-S: 1) 

All seniors planning to graduate with Departmen- 
tal Honors should register for this course, which 
is one credit each semester. In the seminar, stu- 
dents will carry out an independent reading or 
research project in some area of mathematics 
under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The 
student's project will be presented orally in the 
seminar and also as a written paper. 

MT 804-805 Analysis I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is intended to emphasize the basic 
ideas and results of calculus and to provide an 
introduction to abstract analysis. The course be- 
gins with an axiomatic introduction of the real 
number system. Metric spaces are then intro- 
duced. Theoretical aspects of convergence, con- 
tinuity, differentiation and integration are treated 
carefully and are studied in the context of a met- 
ric space. The course includes an introduction to 
the Lebesgue integral. 

Open to undergraduates only with permission 
of the department. 



College of Arts & Sciences • Music • 73 



M 



u 



MT 8 1 4-8 1 5 Theory of Functions of a Complex 
Variable I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Differentiation and integration of a function of a 
complex variable, series expansion, residue theory. 
Entire and meromorphic functions, multiple-val- 
ued functions. Riemann surfaces, conformal map- 
ping problems. 

MT 816-817 Modern Algebra I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: An introductory course in modern or 
linear algebra. 

This course will study the basic structures of 
abstract algebra. Topics will include groups, rings, 
ideal theory, unique factorization, homomor- 
phisms, field extensions and possibly Galois 
theory. 

MT 840-841 Topology I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is a first course in topology for both 
undergraduate and graduate students. Topology 
is the study of geometric phenomena of a very 
general sort, and as such, topological notions ap- 
pear throughout pure and applied mathematics. 
The first semester is devoted to General or Point- 
Set Topology with emphasis on those topics of 
greatest applicability. The subject will be pre- 
sented in a self-contained and rigorous fashion 
with stress on the underlying geometric insights. 
The content of the second semester varies from 
year to year. In general it will be an introduction 
to a specialized area of topology; for example al- 
gebraic, differential or geometric topology. 

MT 860 Mathematical Logic 

This course is a mathematical examination of the 
way mathematics is done: of axiom systems, logi- 
cal inference, and the questions that can (or can- 
not!) be resolved by inference from those axioms. 
Specific topics will include the propositional cal- 
culus, first order theories, decidability, and 
Godel's Completeness Theorem. Not offered 
1992-93 

MT 861 Foundations of Mathematics 

Prerequisite: An introductory course in math- 
ematical logic or the consent of the instructor 

Topics to be treated in this course will be se- 
lected from one or more of the following areas: 
formal number theory, axiomatic set theory, ef- 
fective computability and possibly recursive func- 
tion theory. Not offered 1992-93 

MT 899 Reading and Research (F, S: 3) 



FACULTY 

T. Frank Kennedy, S.J., Associate Professor, 
Chairperson of the Department; B.A., Boston Col- 
lege; M.F.A., Tulane University; Diploma in 
Pastoral Theology, University of London; 
Ph.D., University of California 

Thomas Oboe Lee, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
University of Pittsburgh; M.M., New England 
Conservatory; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jeremiah W. McGrann, Assistant Professor; 
B.A., Austin College; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity 

C. Alexander Peloquin Composer-in-Residence 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department of Music offers courses in West- 
ern and non-Western musics — history, theory, 
composition, and performance to educate both 
listeners and musicians. All students, regardless of 
musical background, are welcome in any course, 
unless a prerequisite or consent of instructor is 
indicated. 

The introductory courses give students a 
broad background in concepts, methods, and rep- 
ertoires from which they may choose more spe- 
cialized courses. Theory and performance courses 
focus on the technical tools of music, with Fun- 
damentals of Music covering the basics as a pre- 
requisite to Tonal Harmony, Jazz Harmony, 
Chromatic Harmony, and Counterpoint, as well 
as Instrumentation, Analysis, and the Seminar in 
Composition. Credit for performance is offered 
through Individual Instruction, Orchestra Prac- 
ticum, Voice for Performance, and Improvisation, 
which are one-credit courses to be taken for three 
semesters in order to count for a full course credit. 
Individual Instrumental Instruction, either credit 
or non-credit, and Voice for Performance both 
involve an extra fee. 

In addition, several free, non-credit perfor- 
mance courses offer instruction and/or coaching 
in various instruments and ensembles. 

The Major in Music 

A music major within a liberal-arts framework is 
broader than that offered by either a conservatory 
or a school of music. 

In a liberal arts framework, courses offer stu- 
dents historical, theoretical, cultural and perfor- 
mance perspectives on music. The student major- 
ing in music at Boston College may find employ- 
ment in teaching, in communications or arts ad- 
ministration, in liturgical music, or may major in 
music simply to provide a firm discipline for the 
mind and as a source of lifelong enjoyment. Some 
students may go on to graduate school or a con- 
servatory to become professional performers, 
composers, musicologists, or ethnomusicologists. 
Within the major, all students receive a common 
core of knowledge with specialization at the 
higher levels in such areas as composition, per- 
formance, music history or cross-cultural studies. 



As we approach the 21st century, a ground- 
ing not only in the traditional musical skills of 
Western fine-art music, but also knowledge of 
music of the 20th century, of American music, and 
of the traditions of other cultures is considered an 
indispensable tool for every music major. 

Required Courses for the Music Major (a 
minimum of 12 courses): 

• Optional Introductory Courses: Fundamentals of 
Music Theory (MU 070) may be substituted for 
one of the electives, with approval of the Chair. 

• Theory, Analysis, and Composition Courses (4 
courses total) 

Prerequisite: MU 070 Fundamentals of Music 
Theory, or equivalent 

• Required of all majors: MU 1 10 Harmony; MU 
211 Chromatic Harmony; MU 3 12 Counterpoint 

• Choice of any one: MU 212 Instrumentation; 
MU 2 1 3 Analysis for Performers; MU 214 
Form and Analysis; MU 2 1 5 Jazz Harmony and 
Arranging; MU 315 Composition Seminar 

• Historical Courses (3 courses total): 
Required of all majors: MU 209 20th Century 
Music 

•Choice of any two*: MU 201 Medieval- 
Renaissance Music; MU 203 Music of the 
Baroque; MU 205 Music of the Classic Era; 
MU 207 Music of the Romantic Era 
*With permission of the Chair, a composer or 
genre course may be substituted for one of these 

• Cross-Cultural Courses (2 courses total): 

Required of all majors, a choice of one from 
each of the following two groups: 

Group I: 

MU 301 Introduction to World Music 

MU 302 Music and Ritual 

MU 304 Chinese Music 

MU 400 Research and Readings — Fieldwork 

Tutorial 

Group 11: 

MU 320 Musics of the Americas 

MU 322 Jazz in America 

MU 330 Irish Traditional Music 

• Peiformance Ensemble Experience (A minimum 
of two semesters): Choose from Boston College 
Symphony Orchestra; Boston College Chamber 
Orchestra; Chamber Music Ensemble or Flute 
Choir; University Chorale; Madrigals; or other 
approved singing group; Concert band or Jazz 
band; Popular Styles Ensemble; Irish 
Traditional Fiddling Class; or a folk, rock, or 
non- Western ensemble (by consultation with 
Chair). 

• Required Senior Seminar (1 semester): The Senior 
Seminar (MU 405) will ordinarily be open only to 
senior music majors; it will allow them a 
framework for synthesizing their various courses 
into a coherent whole, with special emphasis in one 
of the areas listed above (theory and composition, 
history, cross-cultural, or performance) and serve 



74 • College 01 Arts & Sciences • Music 



as preparation for senior exams and/or a senior 
project, with supervised reading, research, writing 
and discussion and/or performance. 

• Electives (2 courses): The student will choose a 
minimum of two semester courses in whatever 
category is appropriate to his or her particular 
interest, whether it be in music-theory and 
composition, performance, history, or cross- 
cultural studies. 

Students with performance emphasis must 
have three semesters of private instruction for 
credit. The three credits for private instruction 
will be granted only upon completion of the third 
semester of lessons. Students with performance 
emphasis will also fulfill the required two semes- 
ters of ensemble participation. 

• Cumulative Listening Competency: Listening based 
on the Required Repertoire for Listening given to 
all majors at the beginning of sophomore year (or 
whenever the major is declared). Each year of the 
music major (normally three), a short list of works 
will be given the student to be acquainted with by 
the end of the year. A listening test on these works 
will be administered until the student passes. In 
addition, all seniors will be expected to have passed 
the minimum competence requirements for Ear 
Training and Sight-Singing (MU 081-082 are 
offered to help the student meet this requirement) 
before graduation. 

Honors 

In order to graduate with departmental honors a 
music major must maintain a B+ grade average, 
pass the ear-training and Listening Repertoire 
requirements with a high score, and produce a 
final project, recital, or paper deemed worthy of 
honors. 

The Recommended Course of Study, Year 
by Year 

• Preliminary Courses, Freshman Year: Freshmen 
who feel they may wish to consider majoring in 
music should, if possible take MU 005, "The 
.Musical Experience" which is a general introduc- 
tion to the field and its various methodologies, and 
may receive retroactive credit for the major if 
passed with a B+ or higher. All students declar- 
ing the music major should try as freshmen to take 
or test out of Fundamentals of Music Theory, a 
course covering the notation of music and funda- 
mental ear-training, or should consider taking it 
in summer school before the commencement of 
the major. 

• Sophomore Year: Harmony and Chromatic Har- 
mony should be taken in sequence. Two history 
courses in Western Music (selected from Medi- 
eval-Renaissance, Baroque Music, Music of the 
Romantic Era, Music of the 20th Century, or a 
composer or genre course) or one history course 
and one cross-cultural course should he taken. 

The first year's required Listening Repertoire 
should be mastered. Some performance experi- 
ence (Orchestra, Chorale, Band, Chamber Mu- 
sic, non-Western performance, and/or private 
lessons) should be started and pursued through- 
out the rest of the major. 

•Junior Year: Counterpoint and a choice of Jazz 
Harmony and Arranging; form and Analysis, 

Transcription of Non-Western Musics, Instru- 
mentation, or Composition and a second or third 
history' course and/or a cross-cultural course. The 



second year of the required Listening Repertoire 
should be mastered. 

• Senior Year: Any advanced courses in the De- 
partment relevant to the particular emphasis the 
student has chosen — performance, composition, 
history, or cross-cultural — and the Senior Semi- 
nar, which will help the student synthesize previ- 
ous coursework. The final year of the required 
Listening Repertoire should be mastered. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
Introductory 

MU 005 The Musical Experience (F: 3) 

This is an introductory course to music in the 
broadest terms possible. We will approach music 
from three vantage points — that of listener, critic, 
and composer — and will look at how music is 
made, what it might mean, and its functions in 
society. The music itself will vary greatly, rang- 
ing from the folk traditions of various cultures, 
pop music, and the Western art tradition. View- 
ing music from these vantage points allows one 
to come away with a broad and well-rounded 
understanding of the musical experience. No pre- 
vious knowledge of music is necessary. 

Jeremiah McGrann 

MU 048-049 Music in Western Civilization 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

A general introduction to Western art music from 
Gregorian Chant to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. 
Continues in spring semester to modern period. 

C. Alexander Peloquin 

MU 050 The Boston College Madrigal Singers 
(F, S: 0) 

A mixed-voice singing group which comes to- 
gether to sing repertoire from the 1 6th to the 20th 
centuries. The group performs on campus for 
various University functions. Laetitia Blain 

MU 066 Introduction to Music (S: 3) 

This course will attempt to develop essential and 
critical listening faculties by employing a chrono- 
logical survey of the elements, forms and various 
types of music that the serious listener is exposed 
to today. The principal emphasis of the course will 
be on traditional Western art music from medi- 
eval Gregorian Chant to 20th century electronic 
music, but certain excursions into the world of 
non-Western musics, jazz and American popular 
song will be included in the syllabus to diversify 
and enrich the experience of listening critically to 
music. T. Frank Kennedy, S.J. 

MU 070 Fundamentals of Music Theory (F, S: 3) 

The course objective is to master the fundamen- 
tal vocabulary of tonal music. The subject area 
covered will be the notation of pitch and rhythm, 
major and minor scales, intervals, triads and el- 
ementary keyboard harmony. This course will 
focus on developing a strong foundation of intel- 
lectual and aural skills. Margaret McAllister 

Performance Courses 

MU 076 Orchestra Practicum (F, S: 1 ) 

Regular, graded participation in the Boston Col- 
lege Orchestra will be given one credit up to the 
limit of three credits during a student's career at 
BC. Consent of Orchestra Director required. 

Neal Hampton 



MU 077 Chamber Music Ensembles (F, S: 0) 

A non-credit course. Regular participation and 
coaching in chamber ensembles. The course is 
offered without credit, and is open to any quali- 
fied student. It will fulfill the music major require- 
ment for ensemble performance. No fee. 

Neal Hampton 

MU 078 Traditional Irish Fiddle Class (F, S: 0) 

A non-credit course. Class and individual instruc- 
tion in the art of Irish fiddle-playing, with oppor- 
tunities to play with instrumental ensembles in 
sessions. Open to any level, no previous experi- 
ence required; violin may be rented at nominal 
cost. No fee. Seamus Connolly 

MU 079 Popular Styles Ensemble (F, S: 0) 

A non-credit course. Regular participation and 
coaching in jazz, rock, and fusion styles in small 
group sessions. Any appropriate instruments are 
welcome. No fee. The Department 

MU 081 Ear Training/Sight-Singing Lab (F, S: 1) 

A twice-weekly opportunity to develop skills of 
sight-singing and ear-training; for students who 
are taking theory or other music courses or who 
are in singing groups and wish to improve their 
skills. Students will learn to sing melodies on sight 
by drilling scales and intervals. Ear-training will 
focus on melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dicta- 
tion. Highly recommended for students taking 
Fundamentals of Music and Tonal Harmony. 

Michael Burgo 

MU 082 Advanced Ear Training/Sight-Singing 
Lab (F, S: 1 ) 

A privately arranged tutorial to continue the skills 
begun in MU 08 1 . Michael Burgo 

MU 083 Introduction to Improvisation (F, S: 1 ) 

Improvisation is a central feature of many West- 
ern musical styles. This course offers students the 
opportunity to learn how to improvise in jazz, 
blues and rock. In a "hands-on" manner, students 
are introduced to the fundamental concepts of 
improvising. No prior experience is necessary, 
and there is no prerequisite, but you should have 
at least some experience playing an instrument or 
singing. The first goal of this course is to estab- 
lish a flow of improvised melody using a simple 
pitch-set like the "blues scale." Students learn how 
to shape a melody that makes sense and are in- 
troduced to the basics of harmony and form. In 
addition to extensive in-class performance, ac- 
companiment recordings are provided for prac- 
tice outside of class. This course may be repeated 
for credit. Bruce Torff 

MU 084 Intermediate Improvisation (F, S: 1 ) 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Improvisation and/or 
consent o/7nstructor 

Elaborating the basic concepts of improvisa- 
tion introduced in Introduction to Improvisation, 
this course focuses in a "hands-on" manner on 
three elements of improvisational skill in jazz, 
blues and rock. First, the course works to develop 
a working knowledge of form and harmony as 
they are manifested in improvisational music; this 
entails learning to recognize musical forms and 
to interpret chord symbols and cadences. Second, 
focus remains on melody-shaping techniques such 
as melodic spacing, phrase length variation, and 
antecedent-consequent phrasing. Finally, the 
course embraces different styles of improvisa- 



College of Arts & Sciences • Ah si< 



75 



tional music and directs attention to recognizing 
and responding to these styles in performance 
situations. Course materials include accompani- 
ment recordings, listening assignments, and read- 
ings. This course may be repeated for credit. 

Bruce Torjf 

MU 085 The Boston College Flute Choir (F, S: 0) 

An ensemble devoted solely to music for multiple 
flutes. Meets once a week with a coach. Public 
performances at B.C. and in the community. 

Maryjo White 

MU 096 (BK 290) Gospel Workshop (F, S: 1 ) 

Study and performance of the religious music of 
the Black Experience known as Spirituals and 
Gospels. One major performance is given each 
semester. Concerts and performances at local 
Black churches are also presented with the Voice 
of Imani Gospel Choir. The Gospel Workshop 
will provide the lab experience for MU 321 (BK 
266) and MU 322 (BK 285). Members of these 
classes will be required to attend a number of re- 
hearsals and performances of the Gospel Work- 
shop. Members of the classes may sing in the choir 
but it is not required for the course. No experi- 
ence is required for membership, but a voice 
placement test is given to each student. 

Hubert Walters 

MU 098 Voice for Performance (F, S: 1 ) 

Emphasis on individual coaching and training in 
developing vocal qualities for performance. Tu- 
torial fee per semester: $ 1 00.00. Laetitia Blain 

MU 099 Individual Instrumental/Vocal 
Instruction (F, S: 1 ) 

Weekly private lessons will receive a single credit 
on approval of the Department Chairperson. Up 
to six units of credit may be received for lessons. 
Lessons must be arranged through the Music 
Department before the end of the drop/add pe- 
riod. Tutorial fee per semester: $330.00 

The Department 

MU 100 Individual Instrumental/Vocal 
Instruction (F, S: 3) 

Weekly private lessons on an instrument or in 
voice or composition for an hour, 45 minutes or 
half an hour. Lessons must be arranged through 
the Music Department before the end of the drop/ 
add period. Tutorial fee per semester: $165.00- 
330.00, depending on length of lesson. 

The Department 

Theory Courses 

MU 110 Harmony (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MU 070 or consent of Department. 
Harmony will cover the principles of diatonic 
harmonic progression, four-part writing from a 
figured bass, and harmonization of chorale melo- 
dies. We will increase our vocabulary to include 
modes and seventh chords, and continue to de- 
velop skills in analysis, keyboard harmony, and 
ear-training. The Department 

MU 21 1 Chromatic Harmony (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MU 1 10 

This course will cover the basic principles of 
chromatic progression. Maintaining the format of 
four-part writing from a figured bass, we will in- 
corporate secondary dominants, diminished sev- 
enth chords, and augmented sixth chords. The 
concepts of modulation and modal interchange 



will be covered, and studies in keyboard harmony, 
ear-training, and analysis will be continued. 

The Department 

MU 212 Orchestration (S: 3) 

The study of the instruments of the symphony 
orchestra, their character, timbre, range; students 
will acquire the ability to read an orchestral score, 
transpose and write instrumental music. 

Margaret McAllister 

MU 215 Jazz Harmony and Arranging (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: MU 070 and proficient performance 
ability on a musical instrument or voice. 

This course will concentrate on the study of 
chord structures, chord scales, the improvised 
line, and how to incorporate these into compos- 
ing and arranging for the jazz combo. Special at- 
tention will be placed on writing for horns, the 
jazz bass line, trap set, the "lead" sheet, rehar- 
monization of "standards," composing new tunes 
based on chord structures of familiar tunes from 
Cole Porter to the Beatles, and the study and 
analysis of the music of Ellington, Monk, Parker, 
Evans, Shorter, and Miles Davis. Student projects 
will be tried out in bi-weekly workshop sessions. 

Tho?nas Oboe Lee 

MU 312 Counterpoint I (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MET 070 or consent of Department 
In this course we will study the fundamentals 
of the two-voice polyphonic style. The course 
objective will be to build a dependable contrapun- 
tal technique using the principles of species coun- 
terpoint. The course will include a brief survey of 
the historical origins of Western polyphony, and 
analysis of ecclesiastical compositions of the last 
half of the sixteenth century. The Department 

MU 315 Seminar in Composition (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of Department 

An introduction to the principles of compo- 
sition. Analysis of representative works in both 
tonal and 20th century idioms. Works by Haydn, 
Mozart, Ravel, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Bartok, 
and others will be analyzed and used as models for 
student compositions. The Department 

Historical Periods 

MU 207 Music of the Romantic Era (F: 3) 

A study of the new concepts, genres, and musical 
institutions that grew up in the 19th century, as 
exemplified by such composers as Schubert, 
Schumann, Mendelssohn, Berlioz, Chopin, Liszt, 
Wagner, Brahms, and Mahler. 

Jeremiah McGrann 

MU 209 Music of the 20th Century (S: 3) 

A study of the music of the 20th century, includ- 
ing concepts, ideas, techniques, compositional 
materials, analytical principles of the music, as 
well as an historical, chronological survey of the 
composers and compositions of the modern era. 
The course will include a study of the 20th cen- 
tury masters Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, and 
Schoenberg, as well as nationalist composers like 
Bartok, Britten and Copland, and the flowering 
of avant-garde music since 1945, including elec- 
tronic music. A discussion of the development of 
jazz and American popular song will be included. 

T. Frank Kennedy, S.J. 



Genres 

MU 206 Opera (S: 3) 

Comedy, tragedy, love, death, vengeance, gods, 
heroines, men who eat nothing but peas — it's all 
the stuff of opera. As one commentator said "You 
can do anything in opera as long as you sing it." 
Operatic references still permeate our culture 
from the use of Wagner's "Ride of the Valkyries" 
in Apocalypse Now to Porky Pig singing Figaro in 
cartoons. In this course we will look at how text 
and music combine to relate a drama, concentrat- 
ing on five representative masters of the 17th 
through 19th centuries — Monteverdi (1567- 
1643), Handel (1685-1759), Mozart (1 756-1 791), 
Verdi (1813-1901), and Wagner (1813-1883). 
This course will take excursions into other 
works — the operas created for the court of Louis 
XIV, the vocal pyrotechnics of the Italian golden 
age of singing, the spectacle of French grand op- 
era, and the operatic qualities of the modern 
Broadway musical. No previous musical training 
is necessary. Jeremiah McGrann 

MU 221 Concerto (F: 3) 

A study of the evolution of the concerto from its 
inception in the early Baroque through the mas- 
terpieces of Vivaldi, Bach, and Handel, to the 
Classic period concerti of Haydn, Mozart, and 
Beethoven, the extension of the solo concerto in 
the Romantic era, and its continuation and 
reinterpretation in the 20th century. 

T. Frank Kennedy, S.J. 

MU 222 Symphony (S: 3) 

A study of selected symphonies from the 18th 
through the 20th centuries by such composers as 
Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Mahler, 
Ives, and others. Students will acquire an under- 
standing of evolving compositional procedures, 
the changing orchestra, as well as social institu- 
tions surrounding symphonic composition. 

Jeremiah McGrann 

Composers 

MU 268 Bach and Handel (F: 3) 

A study ot the lives and works of the two giants 
of the late Baroque. J. S. Bach and G. F. Handel 
led very different lives. Both were born in Ger- 
many in 1685, but Bach remained a local figure 
until after his death, while I landel became an in- 
ternational celebrity, completing his career in 
London. Using a chronological approach, the 
study will include comparison and contrast of 
their keyboard, instrumental, and choral works, 
as well as a consideration of the genres unique to 
each composer. T. Frank Kennedy, S.J. 

MU 270 Beethoven (S: 3) 

An introduction to the life and music of Ludwig 
van Beethoven (1770-1827), tracing his intellec- 
tual development within the culture and society 
of the Rhenish Enlightenment, his musical en- 
richment of the High Classicism of Mozart and 
Haydn (among others), and the "heroic" style of 
his best known works, to his feelings and expres- 
sions of musical and social isolation in his last 
years, and his problematic identity with the bur- 
geoning romantic movement in Germany. Em- 
phasis will be on the music itself, concentrating 
on compositions from three genres: piano sonata, 
string quartet and symphony. Also covered will 
be the concerto, his opera Fidelio, and the Missa 



76 • College of Arts & Sciences • Philosoph\ 



Solemn is. Class time will be spent on perceiving 
the construction and organization of his music 
and its expressive character and power. Readings 
and lectures will touch tangentially on the En- 
lightenment, Kant's moral philosophy, and 
changing aesthetic attitudes towards instrumen- 
tal music as they relate to the composer. 

Jeremiah McGrann 

MU 280 Russian Music (F: 3) 

Russian composers have produced some of the 
most moving and astounding masterworks of 
music from the dark lyricism of Tchaikovsky's 
Pathetique Sy?npbony to the violent brilliance of 
Stravinsky's revolutionary ballet, the Rite of 
Spring. This survey will look at the different iden- 
tities of Russian music as they begin to emerge in 
the 19th century, the problematic relationship of 
a nationalist school to other European musical 
traditions, Russia's exploration of its own multi- 
ethnic culture, the reliance on its folk and litur- 
gical musical traditions, the mystical and revolu- 
tionary creations in the first decades of the 20th 
century, and the struggle of the individual creative 
artist within a Marxist and Soviet society. Some 
of the composers to be studied are Tchaikovsky, 
Rimsky-Korsakov, Mussorgsky, Scriabin, 
Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and 
Shostakovich. Jeremiah McGrann 

Cross-Cultural Courses 

MU 304 Chinese Music (S: 3) 

An introduction to the major vocal and instru- 
mental styles of Chinese music. The Department. 



MU 321 (BK 266) Rhythm and Blues in American 
Music (F: 3) 

This course examines the elements of "rhythm" 
and "blues" in the Afro-American sense, and 
traces the influence of these elements on Ameri- 
can popular and classical music from the early 
1900s to the present. Records, tapes, and audio- 
visual material which include music from the early 
New Orleans period to present day jazz/rock and 
music videos will be used throughout the course. 

Hubert Walters 

MU 322 (BK 285) Jazz in America (S: 3) 

This course provides a thorough and detailed 
study and examination of the black music that has 
come to be known as "jazz." The socio-political 
nature of black music in America, black music in 
education, and the relations of black music and the 
mass media are considered. Students will have the 
opportunity to experience live performances of 
jazz, and will be asked to do a general analysis of 
at least one recording (LP) of a jazz performance. 
There are no prerequisites and students from 
all classifications are welcome. The Department 

MU 330 Introduction to Irish Folk Music (F: 3) 

An introduction to Irish music from two perspec- 
tives: 1) an historical examination of the music and 
its indigenous instruments, and 2) a close study 
of contemporary developments arising from the 
folk music revival of the 1960s, particularly in 
relation to ensemble performance. Both dance 
music and the vocal tradition will be surveyed, 
with an emphasis on the former. 



Live performance will be incorporated where 
possible in class, combined with extensive use of 
audio material as a basis for discussion and analy- 
sis. No previous background is required. 

Me'abh Ni'Fbuarthain 

MU 400 Readings and Research (F, S: 3) 

The Department 

MU 405 Senior Seminar (F: 3) 

For music majors in their senior year (exception 
only by special permission). Through supervised 
reading, research, writing, discussion and perfor- 
mance, this seminar will help' majors develop a 
framework for synthesizing their various courses 
into a coherent whole, with special emphasis in 
the area of strongest interest (theory, composi- 
tion, history, cross-cultural studies, or perfor- 
mance). It will also help prepare students for ex- 
aminations in listening repertoire and ear-train- 
ing (see major requirements above). 

The Department 

Other courses which the Department offers on a 

non-periodic basis include: 

MU 205 Music of the Classic Period 

MU 2 1 3 Analysis for Performers 

MU 220 Song 

MU 227 Keyboard Music 

MU 223 Music and Theater 

MU 3 1 3 Transcription of non-Western Musics 



H I L O 



O 



H Y 



FACULTY 

James Bernauer, S.J. Professor; A.B., Fordham 
University; A.M., St. Louis University; M.Div., 
Woodstock College; S.T.M., Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary; Ph.D., State University of New 
York 

Oliva Blanchette, Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 
College; S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., 
Universit Laval; Ph.L., Collge St. Albert de 
Louvain 

Richard Cobb-Stevens, Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Boston College; Ph.D., Sorbonne 

Hans-Georg Gadamer, Visiting Professor; Hei- 
delberg University 

Peter J. Kreeft, Professor; A.B., Calvin College; 
\.\1., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Richard T. Murphy, Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Boston College; S.T.L., Weston College; 
Ph.D., Fordham University 

Joseph L. Navickas, Professor; Ph.B., Ph.L., 
Louvain University; Ph.D., Fordham Univer- 
sity 

Thomas J. Owens, Professor; A.B., A.M., Bos- 
ton College; Ph.D., Fordham University 

David M. Rasmussen, Professor; A.B., Univer- 
sity of Minnesota; B.D., A.M., Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Chicago 



William J. Richardson, S. J., Professor; Ph.L., 
Woodstock College; Th.L., Ph.D., Mai'tre- 
Agrege, University of Louvain 

Jacques M. Taminiaux, Professor; Doctor 
Juris, Ph.D., Maitre-Agrege, University of 
Louvain 

Norman J. Wells, Professor; A.B., Boston Col- 
lege; L.M.S., Pontifical Institute of Medieval 
Studies; A.M., Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Patrick Byrne, Associate Professor; B.S., A.M., 
Boston College; Ph.D., New York State Uni- 
versity 

John J. Cleary, Associate Professor; A.M., Uni- 
versity College, Dublin; Ph.D., Boston Univer- 
sity 

Joseph F.X. Flanagan, S.J., Associate Professor, 
Chairperson of the Department; A.B., A.M., Bos- 
ton College; S.T.L., Weston College; D.D.S., 
Washington University; Ph.D., Fordham Uni- 
versity 

Arthur R. Madigan, S.J., Associate Professor; 
A.B., Fordham University; A.M., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Toronto; M.Div., S.T.B., Regis Col- 
lege, Toronto 



Stuart B. Martin, Associate Professor; A.B., Sa- 
cred Heart College; L.M.H., Pontifical Insti- 
tute of Medieval Studies; A.M., Ph.D., 
Fordham University 

Francis Soo, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Berchmans College; A.M., University of Philip- 
pines; B.S.T., Fu-Jen University; A.M., 
Harvard University; Ph.D., Boston College 

Eileen C. Sweeney, Associate Professor; B.A., 
University of Dallas; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Texas at Austin 

Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J., Associate Professor; 
A.B., Boston College; M.Div., Weston College; 
Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Ronald Anderson, S.J., Assistant Professor; 
B.Sc, University of Canterbury; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Melbourne; M.Div., Weston School 
of Theology; Ph.D., Boston University 

Thomas S. Hibbs, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
M.A., University of Dallas; M.A.,Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame 

Gerald C. O'Brien, S.J., Assistant Professor; 
A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Fordham 
University 

Vanessa P. Rumble, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Mercer University; Ph.D., Emory University 



College of Arts & Sciences • Philosophy • 77 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Philosophical study at Boston College provides 
the opportunity for open-ended inquiry and re- 
flection on the most basic questions that concern 
man and the ultimate dimensions of his world. In 
this quest for new and fuller meanings, the Phi- 
losophy Department offers a balanced program 
of courses allowing for concentration in the fol- 
lowing specialized areas: Ancient, Medieval and 
Contemporary; American and Contemporary 
Continental Philosophy; Philosophy of Religion, 
Philosophy of Science and Russian Philosophy. In 
addition to these areas of specialization, provision 
is made for interdisciplinary programs. Working 
under the guidance of a faculty advisor students 
can design a well-balanced program that will thor- 
oughly ground them in the history of philosophy 
and yet allow for development of their major in- 
terests. 

Special sections of Core philosophy courses 
are also planned for philosophy majors. Under- 
graduate students may, with the approval of the 
Chairperson and the individual professor, enroll 
in certain of the graduate philosophy courses. 

The Department offers to qualified students 
the opportunity to do independent research un- 
der the direction of a professor and replace one 
course for three credits, extendable to six credits. 
Senior majors may work out a special research 
program as a substitution for normal course re- 
quirements. The Department also participates in 
the Scholar of the College Program, details of 
which are to be found in the general Catalog de- 
scription of the Program. 

Undergraduate majors who plan to do gradu- 
ate work in philosophy will be prepared more than 
adequately to meet all requirements of graduate 
schools. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

The courses listed for the 1992-93 cycle are ten- 
tative. These are courses that the professors have 
given in the past and will be repeated at some 
future date. If a desired course is not offered, 
please consult with the appropriate professor; it 
may be possible to arrange a Readings and Re- 
search course on the desired topic. 

Core Courses 

PL 070-071 Philosophy of the Person I and II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is based on two Socratic sayings: 
"know thyself," and "the unexamined life is not 
worth living." This course, therefore, will analyze 
the key thinkers in Western culture who have 
contributed to our knowledge of ourselves and 
our society. Specific considerations will be given 
to the problem of the human person along with 
the basic rights and responsibilities that each one 
has to himself, herself, and to others. 

The Department 

PL 090-09 1 (TH 090-09 1 ) Perspectives on Western 
Culture I and ll/Perspectives I (F: 6-S: 6) 

This is a special two-semester, twelve-credit 
course that fulfills all the Core requirements in 
philosophy and theology. The course will intro- 
duce the students into their philosophical and 
religious heritage through a study of the writings 
of the major thinkers who have formed our cul- 
tural traditions. The purpose of the course is to 



encourage students to discover the sources of 
those values that have formed their lives as well 
as to develop a critical and creative perspective 
toward themselves and their future. 

The Department 

UN 104-107 Perspectives on Modernism/ 
Perspectives II (F: 6-S: 6) 

A full-year course in the literature, music, and 
visual arts usually connected with the term mod- 
ernism. The first eight weeks of the term will be 
devoted to literature, the last five of the first term 
and the first five of the second to music, and the 
last eight of the second term to the visual arts. 
Among authors read during the literature seg- 
ment will be Baudelaire, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Eliot, 
Kafka, and Joyce. The composers listened to dur- 
ing the music segment will include Wagner, 
Debussy, and Stravinsky; there will also be at least 
one week of jazz. The visual arts segment will 
emphasize not only painting but also sculpture 
and architecture. This course fulfills six credits of 
the Philosophy Core requirement, six credits of 
the English Core requirement, or three credits of 
each requirement. The Department 

UN 109-1 12 Horizons of the New Social 
Sciences/Perspectives III (F: 6-S: 6) 

The course is designed to lead the student to an 
understanding of the unity that underlies the di- 
versity of the separate social sciences of econom- 
ics, sociology, political science, and law from a 
viewpoint that does not prescind from theologi- 
cal issues. The Department 

UN 1 19-122 New Scientific Visions/ 
Perspectives IV (F: 6-S: 6) 

Can the study of modern mathematics and the 
natural sciences prove to be a genuine liberation 
of the human spirit? This unusual question will 
form the central theme of this course. The course 
will explore major developments in the fields of 
mathematics, biology, physics, chemistry and the 
earth and space sciences from ancient Greece, 
through the modern scientific revolutions of the 
seventeenth century, into the twentieth century 
achievements and paradoxes of modern number 
theory, the discovery of DNA, relativity theories, 
quantum mechanics and contemporary 
cosmologies. In particular, the startling innova- 
tions wrought by the concepts of function, energy 
and randomness in the fields of mathematics, bi- 
ology, physics and chemistry will be explored. 
These developments will be presented in their 
mutually conditioning relationships to one an- 
other, and in terms of their impacts upon our 
philosophical world-view. The Department 

PULSE Courses 

PL 088-089 (TH 088-089) Person and Social 
Responsibility (F: 6-S: 6) 

This is a two-semester, twelve-credit course that 
fulfills all the Core requirements in philosophy 
and theology. The course requirements include 
both ongoing involvement in one of the field 
projects available through the PULSE Program 
(see Special Programs section), as well as partici- 
pation in a correlated class. The course will focus 
on problems of social injustice, and the possibili- 
ties of surmounting those injustices. The field 
projects will put students directly in contact with 
people experiencing the consequences of one or 
another form of social injustice — delinquency, 



poverty, psychological problems, prejudice, alien- 
ation. The classes will attempt to take a deeper 
look into these, especially with regard to their 
individual, group and cultural origins. Drawing 
on the works, both contemporary and traditional, 
of key philosophical and religious figures, the 
classes will engage students in the challenge of 
personal self-discovery and growth as they relate 
to the question of what it really means to assume 
responsibility for overcoming these injustices. 

The Department 

PL 202 Housing and Reality (S: 3) 

In-depth analysis of urban housing conditions 
with views to housing sites within the city. Re- 
search into causes of historical, architectural, gov- 
ernmental, financial and neighborhood action to 
maintain and/or create alleviation of the deepen- 
ing housing crisis in our society. Discussion and 
research into possible means of relief. 

Harry Gottschalk 

PL 205 Housing: A Guide for the Perplexed (F: 3) 

In-depth analysis of urban housing conditions 
with views to housing sites within the city. Re- 
search into causes of historical, architectural, gov- 
ernmental, financial and neighborhood action to 
maintain and/or create alleviation of the deepen- 
ing housing crisis in our society. Discussion and 
research into possible means of relief. 

Harry Gottschalk 

PL 216 Boston: An Urban Analysis (S: 3) 

This course is intended for PULSE students who 
are willing to investigate, analyze, and understand 
the history, problems, and prospects of Boston's 
neighborhoods. Assignments will require that you 
spend time observing, researching, and writing 
about the neighborhood in which your PULSE 
placement is located. David Manzo 

PL 233 Values in Social Services and Health 
Care (F: 3) 

This course is designed to: communicate an un- 
derstanding of the health care and social services 
delivery system; explore ethical problems of allo- 
cations of limited resources, regulations, experi- 
mentation, the press, the homeless, the provider- 
patient relationship, the responsibility for the 
dependent person; consider possibilities for posi- 
tive changes in the social service and health care 
system. David Manzo 

PL 291-292 Philosophy of Community I and II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Limited to members of the PULSE 
Council. 

A study of community: its structure, power 
and change. The dynamics of community will be 
examined by sharing impressions and insights 
with various teachers and community workers. 
Specific theoretical models of analysis will be 
studied and critiqued. The purpose of the course 
is to begin developing new approaches for learn- 
ing about social change and for building new vi- 
sions for the direction that a PULSE student's 
responsibility to social change might take. 

Joseph Flanagan, S.J. 

PL 293-294 Culture and Social Structure: 
Philosophy of PULSE I and II 

Prerequisite: Membership on PULSE Council. 

The course will concentrate on the interrela- 
tionships between American political, economic, 



78 • Collect 01 Arts & Sciences • Philosoph\ 



social and military institutions. As these interre- 
lations are explored on a macro scale, a micro- 
analysis of like patterns at the neighborhood and 
city level will also be undertaken. Not offered 
1 992- 9 3 Joseph Flanagan, S.J. 

Electives 

PL 165 The Human Person and Love (F: 3) 

The course will examine the mystery of love in 
its multiple human expressions. The study will be 
from a philosophical and psychological point of 
view, through a consideration of selected readings 
from some classical and modern authors, e.g., 
Luijpen, Fromm, Lewis, Peiper, Plato, Aristotle, 
etc. Daniel J. Shine, S.J. 

PL 168 Philosophy in the Bible 

Exploration of philosophical questions about 
Meaning, God, Truth, Humanity, Morality, 
Love, and Death in 14 books of the Bible from 
Genesis to Revelation. Sot offered 1992-93 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 193 Chinese Classical Philosophy: 
Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism (F: 3) 

Starting from a general introduction to Chinese 
philosophy as a whole, the course will focus on 
three of the most important philosophical schools: 
Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism. Emphasiz- 
ing social harmony and order, Confucianism deals 
mainly with human relationships and human vir- 
tues. Centered on the harmony between Nature, 
Man and Society, Taoism teaches the most natu- 
ral way to achieve this harmony, i.e., Tao. 
Sinicized as soon as it arrived in China, Buddhism 
reveals that the ultimate reality both transcends 
all being, names and forms, and remains empty 
and quiet in its nature. Francis Y. Soo 

PL 194 Contemporary Chinese Philosophy: 
Neo-Confucianism and Maoism (S: 3) 

Within the historical context of modern China 
(from 1840 up to the present), the course will 
focus on contemporary philosophical trends. Two 
of them are of particular importance. One is Neo- 
( lonfucianism which tries to revive or modernize 
not only traditional Confucianism but also Chi- 
nese Classical philosophies in general. 

The other is Chinese Marxism, which under 
Mao, tries to "substitute" Chinese Marxism for 
the Classical Chinese philosophies. It is very in- 
teresting to study how contemporary Chinese 
philosophers have tried to philosophize in con- 
temporary China. Francis Y. Soo 

PL 203 Analytic Philosophy 

1 low to describe the indescribable? This course — 
partly historical, partly systematic — is about the 
limits of language and the limits of the world: how 
the one influences the other. Not offered 1992-93 

Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J. 

PL 251 Political Philosophy: Machiavelli to 
Burke (S: 3) 

This course traces the origins ot some modern 
conceptions of law and the state, the sources and 
limits of political authority through some of the 
great modern political philosophers, relating 
these to the classical Aristotelian tradition. 

Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PL 254 After Death and Dying 

An exploration of life after death, including such 
questions as: What difference does confronting 



death make? Is death a hole or a door? How are 
the meaning of life and the meaning of death con- 
nected? Do we really want to live forever? How 
is Heaven different from the genetic promise of 
an immortality pill? Not offered 1992-93 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 259 (SC 250) (TH 327) Perspectives on War, 
Aggression, and Conflict Resolution I (F: 3) 

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of 
various alternatives to war, evaluated on the ba- 
sis of both practical and ethical criteria. Topics 
include ethics of war and conflict, mutual deter- 
rence, arms control and disarmament, economic 
conversion, world government, regionalism, and 
nonviolent resistance. Rein A. Uritam 

PL 264 Logic (F, S: 3) 

This course will consider the principles of correct 
reasoning together with their application to con- 
crete cases. The Department 

PL 268 (BK 268) (SC 268) The History and 
Development of Racism (F, S: 3) 

To increase participant awareness of the interre- 
lationships of individual and institutional forms 
of racism and to deepen participant understand- 
ing of how to combat racism today. The course 
will survey historical forms of racism in the 
United States and will identify past and present 
methods of opposing racism. Horace Seldon 

PL 269 (SC 251 ) (TH 328) Perspectives on War, 
Aggression, and Conflict Resolution II (S: 3) 

An interdisciplinary course that is concerned pri- 
marily with alternatives and solutions to the prob- 
lem of war, including those advanced in the past 
and present, but also ones that may be required 
to meet the needs of the changing world of the 
future. Rein A. Uritam 

PL 271 (UN 508) Capstone: A Holistic 
Philosophy of Life: East and West (F: 3) 

See course description under the "University 
Courses" section of this Catalog. Francis Y. Soo 

PL 273 (UN 503) Capstone: Private Life/Public 
Life (F: 3) 

See course description under the "University 
Courses" section of this Catalog. Patrick H. Byrne 

PL 275 Philosophy in Literature: Tolkien 

A complete philosophical world and life view 
underlies Tolkien's two great epics, The Lord of 
the Rings and The Silmarillion: a synthesis of in- 
gredients in Plato (exemplarism), Jung (arche- 
types); Romanticism (sehnsucht) and Norse my- 
thology (a Stoic heroism) catalyzed by a Biblical 
imagination and a Heideggerian linguistic. The 
student will learn to recognize these and many 
other strange creatures in exploring Tolkien's 
world. Not offered 1992-93 Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 299 Readings and Research (F, S: 3) 

By arrangement The Department 

PL 303 Philosophical Questions in Religion 

This course is for students who want to form their 
individual opinions rationally on such controver- 
sial religious topics as the psychology of belief, the 
problem of evil, arguments for Clod's existence, 
our knowledge of God, predestination and free 
will, time and eternity, life after death, miracles, 
the reliability of the Bible, mysticism, Eastern vs. 
Western religions. A problem-oriented textbook 



is supplemented by readings in C. S. Lewis and 
Thomas Aquinas. Not offered 1992-93 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 308 Political Thought of the Greeks 

An examination of Greek political philosophy, 
with special emphasis on Plato's Republic and 
Aristotle's Politics; an attempt to apply the re- 
sources of Greek thought to some of the peren- 
nial issues of political philosophy. 
Not offered 1992-93 Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 309 Marriage and the Family (S: 3) 

The course is designed, from a philosophical per- 
spective, to explore the full significance of the 
most fundamental and intimate human relation- 
ship: Marriage/Family, on both institutional and 
personal levels. 

The entire course consists of four parts: 1) It 
begins with a cross-cultural understanding of 
marriage/family by examining some of its many 
cultural variations. 2) Next, we will focus on the 
American traditional marriage/family and see why 
and how it has evolved into its present form, i.e., 
nuclear system. 3) Thirdly, we will try to exam- 
ine the personal dimension of marriage/family 
and study how interpersonal interactions take 
place within the context of marriage/family. 4) 
Finally, we will organize a two-day seminar to 
which students will invite speakers of different 
marital (and non-marital) status to share their 
personal experience (both positive and negative) 
as well as their insights into this very foundation 
of human life. Francis Y. Soo 

PL 31 Genealogy and the History of Ethics (F: 3) 

The course will begin by reading selections from 
Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals and Beyond Good 
and Evil. The remainder of the course will be 
spent testing Nietzsche's account of the history 
of ethics against representative texts and testing 
the texts against Nietzsche's problematic. We will 
focus on texts (to be read in reverse chronologi- 
cal order) of Kant, Aquinas, and Aristotle. Short 
readings from other authors, for example, Hume 
and Luther, will be assigned to fill in gaps in the 
history. The course will end where it began, with 
Nietzsche, by reading The Advantage and Disad- 
vantage of History for Life. Thomas S. Hihhs 

PL 312 Christianity for Pagans (S: 3) 

Pascal, Kierkegaard, and G.K Chesterton offer 
three ways to think and live Christianity in a post- 
medieval, post-Christian world: a way for the 
heart, a way for the will, and a way for the mind, 
respectively; or a way of passion, a way of "sub- 
jectivity," and a way of common sense. This 
course sympathetically explores all three ways. 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 314 The Mind and Its Body (S: 3) 

Am I my body and nothing more? Is there such a 
thing as a souR If there is, can I know anything 
about it? What is the relationship between "mind" 
and "body?" Is the unity between them what ac- 
counts for their existence? Are they separable? 
Could the soul possibly survive the dissolution of 
the body? Can I know any of this? 

These are some of the questions we will 
raise — and try to answer. Ronald K Tacelli, S.J. 

PL 330 Philosophy of Communication (F: 3) 

This course involves both a theoretical and prac- 
tical study of the art of verbal persuasion, com- 



College of Arts & Sciences • Philosophy • 79 



bining the reading of historical texts on rhetoric 
with exercises in the art itself. As expected, we 
begin with selections from Greek and Roman 
thinkers like Plato, Aristotle, Isocrates, Cicero, 
Quintilian and Augustine. Then we study the 
Renaissance thinkers who rediscovered the im- 
portance of rhetoric for the humanist tradition. 
Finally, we consider the function of rhetoric in the 
development of modern democratic societies like 
that of America, where the various media of com- 
munication play an increasingly important role in 
social and political decisions. Along with reflect- 
ing philosophically on rhetoric, the student will 
also be expected to compile "commonplace" 
books and to prepare a verbal presentation in one 
rhetorical genre. JohnJ.Cleary 

PL 335 Platonic Dialogues 

This course is an inquiry into the developing 
thought of Plato, stressing particularly Plato's 
probing into the questions of the nature of man, 
the relation of the individual to society, the na- 
ture of human knowing, the foundation of judg- 
ments of value, and the meaning of a virtuous life. 
The course will include nearly all of what are 
called the early and middle dialogues of Plato, up 
to and including the Republic. The basic thrust 
of the course will be two-fold: first, to understand 
Plato's thought as this unfolds in each dialogue, 
and second, to appropriate this thought in an 
understanding of the context of our own time. 

This course is intended for students who are 
beginning Plato or at least have not studied him 
in depth. No knowledge of Greek is required. Not 
offered 1 992-93 Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PL 338 The Heidegger Project I (F: 3) 

This is a course designed to allow undergraduates 
an opportunity to work closely with the major 
texts of Martin Heidegger, one of the leading 
twentieth-century philosophers. Students will be 
expected to participate in assessing Heidegger's 
relevance to contemporary issues and in develop- 
ing their own philosophical views vis-a-vis 
Heidegger's. Some knowledge of traditional phi- 
losophy (e.g. Aristotle, Descartes, etc.) would be 
helpful, but is not an absolute prerequisite. 

Thomas J. Owens 

PL 339 The Heidegger Project II (S: 3) 

A continuation of PL 338, open only to students 
participating in the course. Thomas J. Owens 

PL 341 Philosophy in the Middle Ages II (S: 3) 

The examination of the perspectives on God, man 
and the cosmos from Augustine to Ockham. 

Norman J. Wells 

PL 344 The Aristotelian Ethics 

Reading of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, and 
examination of its principle themes: happiness, 
virtue, responsibility, justice, moral weakness, 
friendship, pleasure, contemplation. 
Not offered 1 992-93 Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 351 Life, Values, and Morality 

The objective of this course is the examination of 
the meaning of life. A number of problems will 
be discussed: the general notion of value, differ- 
ent types and families of values, including mor- 
ally significant goods and moral obligation. Some 
modern philosophers will be introduced: Nicolai 
Hartmann, Max Scheler, Dietrich von 
Hildebrand, and Alexander Pfander. 



Not offered 1 992-93 Joseph L. Navickas 

PL 358 The Confessions of St. Augustine (F: 3) 

The reflective study of the Christian 
Neoplatonism of Augustine's Confessions with a 
stress on understanding Augustine in the light of 
his background of conservative African Christi- 
anity, Manicheanism, classical literary education 
and Neoplatonic philosophy. The chief empha- 
sis will be on the text of the Confessions in transla- 
tion, but there will also be some reading of other 
texts of Augustine's early works. 

Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PL 379 Socrates and Jesus 

Purpose: to make the acquaintance of and to com- 
pare the two most influential people who ever 
lived — the inventor of reason and the object of 
faith; philosophy and religion compared at their 
source. Intensive reading and discussion of Great 
Dialogues of Plato and John's Gospel. 
Not offered 1 992-93 Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 381-382 After Metaphysics I & II (F:3-S:3) 

Starting from Heidegger and other decon- 
structionists of the metaphysical tradition, this 
course will attempt to reopen the question of be- 
ing as an issue of rational discourse and propose 
a method for dealing with the question scientifi- 
cally in terms of the transcendental properties of 
Being, the One, the True, and the Good. It will 
argue that not "the forgetfulness of being" but the 
forgetfulness of the transcendentals has led to the 
demise of metaphysics in Western philosophy and 
that a refocusing on the transcendentals can open 
the way to a more adequate discourse on Being, 
as such. Oliva Blanchette 

PL 395 Philosophy of Dostoevsky 

The aim of this course is the examination of the 
major philosophical positions of Dostoevsky. The 
course will offer a detailed analysis of the Grand 
Inquisitor. The following issues will be examined: 
the critique of the Catholic Church, the struggle 
between good and evil, the conflict between free- 
dom and happiness, and Dostoevsky's dialectical 
approach. Not offered 1992-93 Joseph L. Navickas 

PL 402 Kant's Moral Philosophy 

How we make moral decisions warrants close 
examination. Often we experience a conflict be- 
tween what seems the best and what seems the right 
thing to do. Kant offers a theory to substantiate 
our choice for what is right — our duty. This view 
has been challenged. The course seeks to present 
and evaluate Kant's theory of duty. 
Not offered 1992-93 Richard T Murphy 

PL 403 Does God Exist? (F: 3) 

An intensive examination of arguments for and 
against God's existence. Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J. 

PL 404 Philosophical Autobiography (S: 3) 

We will examine the philosophical anthropologies 
of Augustine, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and Sartre and 
discuss the manner in which their understandings 
of human nature find expression in their autobi- 
ographies. Vanessa P. Rumble 

PL 405 Self-Deception and Morality 

At the heart of our western tradition is the belief 
that moral endeavor and self-understanding are 
inseparable. Particularly in Kantian and Post- 
Kantian philosophy, the avoidance of self-decep- 
tion has assumed central importance. 



This course will deal with the main moral and 
anthropological perspectives on self-deception 
that have emerged in western philosophy, particu- 
larly in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Two related questions will be posed to each of the 
thinkers studied: 1) how must the human self be 
constituted in order for self-deception to be pos- 
sible? 2) is the self-deceiver morally responsible? 
Not offered 1992-93 Vanessa P. Rumble 

PL 415 Great Trials in Western Civilization (S: 3) 

Since the time of Socrates, many of the central 
issues of human existence have been raised and 
treated in judicial trials. After an initial consider- 
ation of Kafka's The Trial, this course will exam- 
ine the development of our sense of moral judg- 
ment by a study of significant trials which have 
taken place in western civilization. Among those 
to be considered and the issues raised by them are: 
the trial of Galleo (science and religion), Dred 
Scott (racism), Louis XVI (revolution and justice), 
Dreyfus (anti-semitism), Nuremberg trials (war 
and responsibility), Eichmann (modern forms of 
evil). James IV. Bernauer, S.J. 

PL 416 Hannah Arendt: Human Condition and 
The Life of the Mind 

Though still controversial, Hannah Arendt is now 
recognized as one of the major thinkers of this 
century in areas such as political philosophy and 
deconstruction of metaphysics. The purpose of 
the course is to offer an introduction to the main 
topics in her inquiry into first, the structures of 
active life (labor, work, action, the private and 
public) and second, her criticism of several con- 
stantly recurring prejudices in the works of those 
who are entirely dedicated to the activity of think- 
ing; that is, the professional philosophers. 
Not offered 1992-93 Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 420 Legacy of Plato and Aristotle in 
Christian Fine Arts into the Renaissance 

A study of the theological and philosophical back- 
ground of Christian painting, sculpture, and ar- 
chitecture. Not offered 1992-93 

Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 421 Nietzsche (S: 3) 

Through a chronological analysis of the basic texts 
of Nietzsche, this course aims at discussing the 
meaning of his attempt to overcome platonism. 

Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 428 Introduction to Phenomenology 

An historical and textual survey of the develop- 
ment of the Phenomenological movement from 
Husserl to Heidegger. Not offered 1992-93 

Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 434 (UN 502) Capstone: Ethics in the 
Professions (F: 3) 

This course will focus on controversial moral di- 
lemmas which arise in the professions of law, 
business, medicine, education, and journalism. In 
addition to considering some key ethical theories 
(e.g., pluralism and utilitarianism) which can be 
used as a framework for addressing these prob- 
lems, it will also dwell on relevant moral notions 
such as virtue and collective responsibility. The 
course will deal extensively with issues such as 
privacy and confidentiality, deception, whistle- 
blowing, preferential hiring, and so forth. Cases 
will be used to help students develop analytical 
skills and enhance their capacity for making 



80 • College of Arts & Sciences • Philosophy 



sound, moral judgments in different situations. 
Speakers representing some of these professions 
will discuss their conceptions of professional re- 
sponsihility along with the ethical dilemmas 
which they have encountered. Readings will in- 
clude: Ethical Issues in Professional Life; Lying: A loral 
Choice in Public and Private Life; and a number of 
case studies. Richard A. Spinello 

PL 435 Theory of the Novel (F: 3) 

This course will consider the relationship between 
the production of literature and philosophy. Al- 
though writers do not intend to be philosophers, 
they do isolate and present a specific vision of 
reality. This course will concentrate on the philo- 
sophic vision presented in specific literary texts 
such as: One Hundred Years of Solitude, Crime and 
Punishment, The Sun Also Rises, Death in Venice, 
Light in August, and Madame Bovary. 

David M. Rasmussen 

PL 436 The Development of American 
Pragmatism (F: 3) 

A critical study of the main ideas of the pragma- 
tists — Peirce, James and Dewey. Topics to be 
considered are Experience; Meaning and Truth; 
Freedom, Theory and Practice; and the role of 
Scientific Inquiry. John S?//ith 

PL 439 Existentialism and Art (Nietzsche to Sartre) 

(S:3) 

An examination of key existentialist theories of art 
from Nietzsche and Kierkegaard to Sartre and 
Merleau-Ponty. 

PL 442 Search for Selfhood: Romanticism and 
German Idealism (F: 3) 

Kant's transcendental idealism has been charged 
with divorcing the subject of understanding from 
the subject of moral experience. We shall exam- 
ine the basis of this claim, as well as the attempts 
by Romantic writers and German Idealists to pro- 
vide a fresh account of the integrity of human 
experience. Vanessa P. Rmiible 

PL 449 Corporations and Morality (F, S: 3) 

This course will begin with a reflection on the 
main ethical theories which can be used as frame- 
works for making moral judgments. To test the 
efficacy of such theories, we will examine several 
cases dealing with moral dilemmas which can arise 
in the workplace. At this point, our focus shifts 
to the corporation as a special entity in society 
which has the same autonomy and moral agency 
as the human person. After delineating a tenable 
theory of corporate responsibility, we will exam- 
ine how the corporation functions as both a moral 
agent in the larger society and as a moral environ- 
ment to be managed with a view to the freedom 
and well-being of its members. The main focus 
will be on managing the corporation's relation- 
ship with the social and natural environment in 
which it operates. Issues to be considered in this 
regard will include marketing and advertising, 
product safety, environmental pollution, bank- 
ruptcy, and international business. Since the trend 
of globalization in the business environment re- 
mains so predominant, special attention will be 
paid to the peculiar problems which often surface 
when doing business in the international market- 
place. Richard A. Spinello 



PL 452 Perspectives on Addiction 

This course attempts to apply the ordering and 
integrating function of philosophy to the multi- 
faceted problem of addiction. The chief focus is 
on alcoholic addiction, but includes addiction to 
other drugs as well. Not offered 1992-93 

Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PL 455 Kierkegaard and Nietzsche (F: 3) 

Kierkegaard and Nietzsche are the two most im- 
portant giants of thought in the nineteenth cen- 
tury and the two leading influences on contem- 
porary thought. This course will study their lives 
and the predominant themes of their thought 
along the lines of Christian belief and Atheistic 
Humanism. The class will include lectures, stu- 
dent reports, and analyses of some of their impor- 
tant writings. Stuart B. Martin 

PL 465 Sexuality: New Histories, Old Ethics? 
(S:3) 

The last twenty years have witnessed an explosion 
of historical investigations of sexuality in western 
culture. This course will examine several of these 
studies in the interest of appreciating the histori- 
cal development of anxiety toward and acceptance 
of sexual activity. We will attempt to explore the 
implications of these historical visions for an ethi- 
cal approach to sexual conduct. 

James W. Bemauer, S.J. 

PL 467 Jean-Paul Sartre (S: 3) 

An analysis of Sartre's early writings on imagina- 
tion and consciousness. Emphasis will be placed 
upon his penetrating studies of freedom, bad faith 
and the sado-masochistic dimensions of interper- 
sonal relations. Both literary and philosophical 
texts will be discussed. Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PL 475 Philosophy of Language 

This course will focus on the major strands in 20th 
century philosophy of language, beginning with 
Bertrand Russell and ending with Jacques 
Derrida. Along the way we will study the views 
of I. A. Richards, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Kenneth 
Burke, J. L. Austin, and Paul Ricouer. We will try 
to understand these different accounts of language 
as texts which form some of the roots of both 
"analytic" and "continental" philosophy of lan- 
guage, and which span the distance between "lit- 
erary" and "philosophic" reflections on language. 
Our goal will be to see these thinkers in conver- 
sation with one another, as offering different 
models to illustrate the nature of language, its 
possibilities and limitations. Not offered 1992-93 

Eileen C. Sweeney 

PL 476 Hume 

At this time, there has arisen from diverse philo- 
sophical traditions a renewed interest in I lume. 
This course will undertake to investigate I Iume's 
contributions both in the epistemological and in 
the moral sphere. Thereby, Hume's study of the 
human person will emerge — a study now chal- 
lenging contemporary thinkers. 
Not offered 1992-93 Richard T. Murphy 

PL 479 Contemporary German Philosophy (S: 3) 

In this course, consideration will be given to cur- 
rent developments within German philosophy. 
Husserl, Heidegger, Gadamer, and Habermas 
will be among the philosophers considered. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to current movements 



within German philosophy, including phenom- 
enology, hermeneutics and critical theory. 

David M. Rasmussen 

PL 482 Political Philosophy: Hobbes to Hegel 

(F:3) 

Through an analysis of the basic political concepts 
of major thinkers like Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, 
Rousseau, Kant and Hegel, this lecture course 
aims at an introduction — both historical and 
philosophical — to current issues like technocracy, 
consumerism, the private and the public, politi- 
cal judgment, freedom of expression, etc. 

Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 485 Philosophy of Comparative Religions — 
East and West 

This course has a twofold purpose. First, it ex- 
plores one of the fundamental questions in phi- 
losophy: the religious or a-religious nature of 
man. Is man essentially a religious being, and 
hence is self-sufficient per se. Or is man essentially 
an a-religious being, and hence is not self-suffi- 
cient per se. Secondly, this course is also a com- 
parative study of philosophies of Western and East- 
ern religions. Five of the world's major living re- 
ligions (Judaism, Christianity, Taoism, Buddhism 
and Shintoism) will be studied separately, and 
then follows a comparative evaluation of them. It 
is hoped that a synthetic understanding of the 
religious or a-religious nature of man would be 
achieved. Not offered 1992-93 Francis Y. Soo 

PL 490 Aquinas and Pascal: Styles of 
Philosophical Theology 

This course will compare and critically appraise 
two approaches to philosophical theology. Top- 
ics to be considered: the intelligibility of the cos- 
mos, the limits of human reason, the viability and 
efficacy of natural theology, the relation between 
philosophy and theology. Texts will be taken from 
Pascal's Pense'es and Provincial Letters and from 
Aquinas's Summa Theologiae and Summa Contra 
Gentiles. We will consider the Aristotelian basis 
of Aquinas's thought, the Cartesian influences on 
Pascal, and the influence of Augustine on both. 
Attention will also be given to the relevant, recent 
literature in the growing field of philosophical 
theology. Not offered 1992-93 Thomas S. Hibbs 

PL 497 Parmenides (S: 3) 

An investigation of the background, life and phi- 
losophy of the greatest of the Greek philosophers 
before Socrates. Parmenides was thoroughly a 
man of his time; yet, against the tide of Greek 
physical speculation, he launched the science of 
metaphysics; in a polytheistic society, he was a 
monotheist; in a male-oriented society, he envi- 
sioned reality under the guise of a woman. Some 
elementary Greek grammar will be taught in con- 
junction with this course so that we can together 
share the authentic vision of Parmenides. 

Stuart B. Martin 

PL 529 Philosophy of Action (S: 3) 

A study of the concrete approach to transendence 
through human action as found in Maurice 
Blondel's science of practice and its relation to 
practical science. Oliva Blanchette 

PL 532 Issues in Science and Religion 

While science and religion have often been seen 
as separate enterprises in conflict with each other, 
this course will seek to develop the ways in which 



College of Arts & Sciences • Philosophy • 81 



they may interrelate and engage with each other. 
The issues will be focused by addressing the topic 
of how God's action within the world can be un- 
derstood. It will be argued that this topic, which 
is foundational for developing a religious perspec- 
tive on the world, requires treatment within the 
context of the natural sciences. At the same time, 
it will be argued that natural science must be open 
to entertaining this question if it is to be consis- 
tent with the presuppositions that have directed 
its growth and success. Not offered 1992-93 

Ronald Anderson, S.J. 

PL 535 Scientific Revolutions I 

This course will study the development of the 
Copernican revolution against the background of 
the ancient and medieval views of the universe. 
We will read selections from the original works 
of Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Kepler; along with 
two major works by Galileo, who was chiefly re- 
sponsible for the consolidation of the new world 
view. In studying these works, we shall focus on 
the following problems: a) the problem of plan- 
etary motion and b) the problem of terrestrial 
motion. The guiding theme of the course is the 
fruitful interaction of problems and theories. Not 
offered 1992-93 John J. Cleary 

PL 536 Scientific Revolutions II 

This course will continue and complete our study 
ot the Copernican Revolution which was begun 
in Scientific Revolutions I. We will read closely 
some of the key scientific works of both Descartes 
and Newton — the two central figures for the 
completion of the scientific revolution heralded 
by Copernicus. Finally, we will consider its most 
important philosophical implications as spelled 
out in the works of Kant, who self-consciously 
introduced a "Copernican Revolution" in philoso- 
phy. Not offered 1992-93 John J. Cleary 

PL 538 Law, Business and Society (F: 3) 

This course makes use of an interdisciplinary ap- 
proach to studying society and social issues related 
to Law, Business, and Society, i.e., the political, 
economic and social spheres of human life. 

Starting from the notion of "law" and "right," 
the course will first study the American legal sys- 
tem. We will examine its historical roots, its Con- 
stitution, various legal theories and their practice 
(i.e., cases). Then, we will move into a critical 
study of the major economic thoughts or theories: 
Classical, Neoclassical, Marxist, and Supply-side 
economics. Finally, we will examine the Ameri- 
can social system in terms of its class structure, 
power elite, bureaucratization, and social status. 

Throughout the course, the students will be 
asked to develop critical thinking and reflect on 
important social issues such as equality, crime, 
family crisis, and justice. Francis Y. Soo 

PL 544 St. Thomas Aquinas 

Prerequisites: a knowledge of Aristotelian logic and 
Aristotelian philosophical terminology, e.g., 
Kreyche's Logic for Undergraduates and Adler's 
Aristotle for Everybody. 

This course is a survey of the distinctive teach- 
ings of Aquinas' metaphysics, cosmology, anthro- 
pology, epistemology, ethics, politics, and philo- 
sophical theology. Not offered 1992-93 

Peter J. Kreeft 



PL 554 Philosophy of Poetry and Music (S: 3) 

This course will deal with the history of poetry, 
painting, sculpture, architecture, music and dance. 
A major perspective will be the interrelation of 
these art forms to their respective cultural peri- 
ods. Students will be encouraged to work out their 
own projects or to select studies on Eastern or 
Western Art. Joseph F. Flanagan, S.J. 

PL 557 Modernism and Philosophy 

This course deals with the origins and develop- 
ment of the "Modernist" movement during the 
past century. We shall consider examples of the 
fiction, poetry, painting, music, and architecture 
of the period. Special attention will be paid to the 
ethical and other philosophical implications of the 
modernist movement. Not offered 1992-93 

Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PL 561 Freud and Phenomenology 

The course will present the chief principles and 
concepts belonging to the method of psycho- 
analysis developed by Sigmund Freud. After the 
close examination of his general psychological 
theory a philosophical critique of the Freudian 
method will be given from the phenomenologi- 
cal viewpoint. This critique will introduce a brief 
sketch of the phenomenological method as ap- 
plied in existential analysis. Not offered 1992-93 

Richard T. Murphy 

PL 563 The Great Philosophers I (F: 3) 

This course is not a survey of the history of phi- 
losophy but an interpretation of the history of 
philosophy. That is, it does not survey the whole 
course of ancient and medieval philosophy, but 
rather traces a theme through ancient and medi- 
eval philosophy. The theme to be studied will vary 
from year to year. Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 564 The Great Philosophers II (S: 3) 

This course is a continuation of the Great Phi- 
losophers I. The purpose of the present course is 
to exhibit philosophy as the thought of remark- 
able individuals, not as an integral part of cultural, 
social, and political life. This purpose demands 
more account of individual thought than is usu- 
ally given by the historians. 

Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J. 

PL 577 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (S: 3) 

An introduction to modern formal logic designed 
to familiarize students with both the methods for 
expressing ordinary language arguments in sym- 
bolic form and with the various techniques used 
to analyze and evaluate the validity of arguments 
expressed in symbolic form. The course will cover 
propositional and predicate logic, some of the 
subtleties involved in the way we use ordinary 
language in reasoning, and some of the horizons 
of 20th century logic such as the interesting para- 
doxes of self-reference, "formal systems," and the 
limits of logic in human thought. 

Ronald Anderson, S.J. 

PL 584 C.S. Lewis (F: 3) 

Lewis wrote poetry, literary criticism, science fic- 
tion, fantasy, philosophy, theology, religion, lit- 
erary history, epics, children's stories, historical 
novels, short stories, psychology and politics. He 
was a rationalist and a romanticist, a classicist and 
an existentialist, a conservative and a radical, a 
pagan and a Christian. No writer of our century 
had more strings to his bow, and no one excels 



him at once in clarity, in moral force, and in 
imagination: the true, the good, and the beauti- 
ful. This course is a total immersion experience 
in this remarkable man through his writings — 
aiming not primarily at him but at ourselves and 
our world seen through his eyes. Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 593 Philosophy of Science (F: 3) 

An introduction to the various themes concerned 
with the interplay between philosophy and sci- 
ence. The nature of scientific explanations and the 
cognitive status of scientific theories will be con- 
sidered. The roles of induction and deduction in 
scientific discovery will be examined as well as a 
number of metaphysical questions raised by the 
natural sciences such as the ontological status of 
the various entities which make up scientific theo- 
ries. Examples will be considered from both the 
biological and physical sciences, with a particular 
focus on evolutionary theory and modern cosmo- 
logical theories about the universe. 

Ronald Anderson, S.J. 

PL 595 Kant's Critique (F: 3) 

An analysis of the major theme of Kant's philoso- 
phy as expressed in his first critique, including a 
study of its antecedents and consequences in the 
history of philosophy. Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J. 

PL 602 Philosophy of World Religions (F: 3) 

A sympathetic, objective but "existential" com- 
parative exploration of eight of the world's 
"higher religions," beginning with readings from 
each religion's own scriptures (data) and conclud- 
ing with interpretation and discussion of ecumeni- 
cal dialog, especially between East and West. 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 603 Ancient, Medieval and Modern 
Accounts of the Will and Passions (F: 3) 

This course will examine the views of Aristotle, 
Thomas Aquinas, Rene Descartes (and some 
other modern thinkers) on the affective part of the 
human psyche, the will and the passions. We will 
be concerned with the relationship between the 
affective and intellectual capacities of the human 
person, as well as differences and developments 
in the notion of freedom of the will and the emo- 
tional composition of the person through these 
periods and thinkers. Changes in the Ancient, 
Medieval, and Modern list of the passions or 
emotions and in the relative importance of the 
different passions will also be considered. We will 
also discuss whether and to what degree pre-mod- 
ern accounts of the will and passions are subject 
to the same criticisms now being made of Classi- 
cal Modern accounts of the will, the passions and 
the unified subject. Eileen C. Sweeney 

PL 607 Seminar: Socratic Dialectic (S: 3) 

Method: Socratic dialectic and Aristotelian ordi- 
nary-language logic. Classes: informalization of 
medieval scholastic disputation. Issues: faith and 
reason; existence, nature and knowability of God; 
problem of evil; predestination and free will; soul 
and immortality; heaven and hell; miracles and 
resurrection; identity of Jesus; Bible as myth vs. 
Bible as history; relation between religion and 
morality; religious experience; comparative reli- 
gions Eastern and Western. Genre: philosophi- 
cal apologetics. Peter J. Kreeft 



82 • College of Arts <Sc Sciences • Physics 



PL 608 Humanism and Anti-Humanism 

This course will examine contemporary notions 
of humanism (e.g., Sartre, Heidegger) and the 
critique that has been made of humanism by such 
thinkers as Althusser, Foucault, Derrida and 
Lacan. Not offered 1992-93 

William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PL 614 Hussert and Hume 

Descartes and Hume exerted the greatest influ- 
ence on Husserl's development of phenomenol- 
ogy. This course, after beginning with a brief 
exposition of Husserl's version of the phenom- 
enological method, will examine Hume's positive 
impact on Husserl's thought, especially in its later 
stages. It is anticipated that Hume's contribution 
to Husserl's turn to radical subjectivism will be 
documented. Not offered 1992-93 

Richard T. Murphy 

PL 615 British Empiricism (S: 3) 

This course introduces British empiricism 
through the epistemological theories of Locke, 
Berkeley, and Hume. Within this historical con- 
text, the representationalist theory of perception 
developed by Locke and criticized by Berkeley 
and Hume will be presented. The contemporary 
discussions concerning the correct interpretation 
of these thinkers will be examined. 

Richard T. Murphy 

PL 618 The Process of Becoming 

Scientific developments such as the theories of 
evolution, relativity, and quantum mechanics have 
forever changed the ways we view reality. This 
course traces the attempts of twentieth-century 
philosophers and theologians such as Bergson, 
Whitehead, Teilhard, and Hartshorne to forge 
new conceptions of reality adequate to these in- 
tellectual breakthroughs. Not offered 1992-93 

Patrick H. Byrne 

PL 620 The Eclipse of the Good: New 
Orientations in Contemporary Ethics 

This course is directed to upper-division under- 
graduate as well as graduate students. It will ex- 
amine major theories in contemporary ethics 
from the perspective that these theories have been 
provoked by novel experiences of evil. Among the 
authors to be considered are Alasdair Maclntyre, 
.Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Martha 
Xussbaum, Robert Lifton and Piaget. Other re- 
sources utilized by the course will include contem- 
porary literature and film. Not offered 1992-93 
James W. Bernauer, S.J. 

PL 625 The Problem of Self-Knowledge (F: 3) 

"The unexamined life is not worth living." 
Socrates' proclamation forms the basic assump- 
tion of this course. However, important develop- 
ments in Western culture have made the approach 
to self-knowledge both more difficult and more 
essential. Students will be invited to discover in 
themselves dimensions of their subjectivity which 
lead to resolution of fundamental issues. The 
work of Bernard Lonergan will serve as a guide. 

Joseph F. Flanagan, S.J. 

PL 626 Hannah Arendt: Learning to Love the 
World 

An examination of Arendt's philosophical 
achievement: her treatment of the active life of 
labor, work, action, and the mind's life of think- 
ing, willing, judging. The specific theme for the 
course will be this contemporary thinker's effort 



to renew a love for the world and an appreciation 
of the worldly traits of those who call it home. In 
addition to reading her major texts, there will be 
consideration of the political and philosophical 
contexts within which she formulated her 
thought. Not offered 1992-93 

James W. Bernauer, S.J. 

PL 629 Introduction to Hermeneutics (F: 3) 

An examination of the contemporary problem of 
hermeneutics in light of its historical antecendents 
for entry-level M.A. students and advanced un- 
dergraduates. William J. Richardson 

PL 632 The Later Heidegger 

This course will consider major themes in 
Heidegger's development after the so-called 
"turning" in his way (circa 1930). These will be- 
come manifest in certain selected representative 
texts. 

Required: a serious knowledge of Being and 
Time, such as gained from "The Heidegger 
Project" or its equivalent. Not offered 1992-93 

William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PL 633 Metaphysics: Selected Texts (F: 3) 

A diligent examination of selected classical meta- 
physical texts, chosen for intrinsic importance and 
for historical influence. Texts to be studied will 
vary from year to year. Proficiency in Greek will 
be an asset. Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 634 The Philosophy of Jurgen Habermas 

A seminar on the more recent (1981 and later) 
writings of Jurgen Habermas. We will consider 
the following topics: the theory of communica- 
tive action; the theory of modernity; theories of 
law and politics; aesthetics. Not offered 1992-93 

David M. Rasmussen 

PL 637 Hegel's Philosophy of Law (F: 3) 

This seminar will consider Hegel's philosophy of 
law from both historical and contemporary per- 
spectives. The seminar will concentrate on a read- 
ing of The Philosophy of Right. Special emphasis will 
be given to Hegel's contribution to the current 
discussion of the relationship between law and 
philosophy. Topics of interest will include: the 
link between law and morality, law and political 
philosophy, law and the problem of interpreta- 
tion, contextualization and neo-Aristotelian as- 
sumptions about the nature of law versus univer- 
salist (Kantian and neo-Kantian) perspectives on 
law and the Hegelian and current discussion of 
Civil Society. David M. Rasmussen 



PL 638 Plato: Selected Dialogues 

A study of (at most) a half-dozen Platonic dia- 
logues, chosen to suit the philosophical interests 
of instructor and students. For students with some 
background in Plato. Not offered 1992-93 

Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 641 Ethics and Psychoanalysis 

An examination of the ethical problem as posed 
by psychoanalysis. Not offered 1992-93 

William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PL 643 Great Contemporaries 

A study of one or more authors who have made 
or are making a significant contribution to phi- 
losophy in the twentieth century. Authors to be 
studied will vary from year to year. The focus will 
be on authors such as Alasdair Maclntyre, Martha 
Nussbaum, and Charles Taylor who 1 ) assimilate 
the Western philosophical tradition in a creative 
way; 2) present a substantive and well-argued 
philosophical position (a "live option"); and 3) 
refine the style and enrich the language of phi- 
losophy itself ("purify the dialect of the tribe"). 
Not offered 1 992-93 Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 680 The Phenomenology of Edmund Husserl 

A study of the major themes of Husserl's early 
works: intentionality, time-consciousness, the 
interplay of experience and language, seeing as 
interpretation. Emphasis will be placed upon the 
ontological implications of phenomenology. Not 
offered 1992-93 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PL 681-682 Symbols (Perspectives II) and 
Science (Perspectives IV) 

This is a two-semester, 12-credit course. The 
syllabus is taken from Perspectives II (Modern- 
ism & the Arts) and Perspectives IV (New Scien- 
tific Visions). We will explore the ways in which 
artistic and scientific understanding compliment 
and enhance one another. Not offered 1 992-93 

Joseph Flanagan, S.J. 

PL 691 Kant's Critique of Judgment (S: 3) 

This seminar will focus on a reading of Kant's 
famous "Third Critique." We will also consider 
contemporary readings of The Critique of Judge- 
ment. We will also be interested in both the im- 
pact of this work on contemporary "aesthetic 
theory" and its contribution to recent debates on 
ethics, politics and contemporary democratic 
theory. David M. Rasmussen 



H 



Y 



FACULTY 

Frederick E. White, Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
Boston University; B.S., Ph.D., Brown Univer- 
sity 

Solomon L. Schwebel, Associate Professor 
Emeritus; B.S., City College of New York; 
M.S., Ph.D., New York University 

Francis A. Liuima, S.J., Assistant Professor 
Emeritus; M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., St. 
Louis University 

Robert L. Carovillano, Professor; A.B., Rutgers 
University; Ph.D., Indiana University 



c 



Joseph H. Chen, Professor; B.S., Saint Procopius 
College; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Baldassare Di Bartolo, Professor; Dott. Ing., 
University of Palermo; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

George J. Goldsmith, Professor; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Vermont; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue Univer- 
sity 

Rein A. Uritam, Associate Professor, Chairperson 
of the Department; A.B., Concordia College; 
A.B., Oxford University; A.M., Ph.D., 
Princeton University 



College of Arts & Sciences • Physics • 83 



David A. Broido, Assistant Professor; B.S., Uni- 
versity of California, Santa Barbara; Ph.D., 
University of California, San Diego 

Michael J. Graf, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Sc.M., Ph.D., 
Brown University 

Krzysztof Kempa, Assistant Professor; M.S., 
Technical University of Wroclaw; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wroclaw 

Pradip M. Bakshi, Research Professor; B.S., 
University of Bombay; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Gabor Kalman, Research Professor; D.Sc, Israel 
Institute of Technology 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department of Physics offers a rich and com- 
prehensive program of study leading to a B.S. 
degree in physics. 

This program is designed to prepare a student 
for advanced graduate studies and a professional 
career in physics. Minimum requirements in the 
B.S. program are adequate tor students planning 
on immediate employment upon graduation or 
undertaking certain career directions outside ot 
physics. Courses are in classical and modern phys- 
ics and emphasize physical concepts and experi- 
mental methods. The laboratory program offers 
broad experience in experimental physics and 
opportunity to work closely with faculty and 
graduate students on advanced research projects. 

The minimum requirements ot the physics 
major program include eleven lecture courses in 
physics of which nine are numbered above 300. 
Among these the following seven are required: 
PI I 303, 304, 401, 402, 403, 411, and 420. In ad- 
dition, a physics major must choose at least two 
of the following elective courses: PH 404, 412, 
425, 441, 480, or 525. The required laboratory 
courses are PH 203-204, PH 405-406, and PH 
535. In addition, especially for students concen- 
trating in experimental physics, either PH 536 or 
(with approval) PH 538 is strongly recommended. 
PH 532, Senior Thesis, is recommended for stu- 
dents planning graduate work in physics. Math- 
ematics through the level of advanced calculus is 
required; the Mathematics Department offers 4- 
credit calculus courses (MT 102, 103, 202, 305) 
and physics majors are encouraged to enroll in 
these rather than in the 3 -credit course sequence. 
The final requirement is two approved courses in 
a science other than physics, normally General 
Chemistry, CH 109-1 10, along with the associ- 
ated laboratory. 

A physics major with a satisfactory scholastic- 
average (3.3 or higher) may apply for entry into 
the Departmental honors program. Application 
must be made to the Undergraduate Affairs Com- 
mittee no earlier than the beginning of junior year 
and no later than the first quarter of senior year. 
Each applicant must solicit a faculty advisor to su- 
pervise the proposed research project. Honors 
will be granted upon: a) Satisfactory completion 
of a thesis based on the research project; b) Dem- 
onstration through an oral examination of a broad 
comprehension of physics in general and the spe- 



cial field of the thesis. The examining committee 
shall be appointed by the Chairperson and con- 
sist of a two-member faculty Honors Committee 
and one additional examiner from the physics fac- 
ulty or graduate student body. 

Advanced undergraduate physics majors may, 
with the approval of the Chairperson, enroll in 
first-year graduate courses, such as PH 711, 732, 
or 741, described in the Graduate Catalog. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Courses numbered below 200 are introductory 
courses directed generally at non-science majors. 
These courses have no prerequisites and utilize 
no mathematics beyond ordinary college entrance 
requirements. Introductory physics courses may 
be used to fulfill the Science Core requirement. 
PH 209-2 10 Introductory Physics I, II (Calculus) 
or PH 2 1 1 -2 1 2 Introduction to Physics I, II (Cal- 
culus) and PH 203-204 Introductory Physics 
Laboratory I, II are required of all biology, chem- 
istry and physics majors. Courses numbered above 
300 are advanced offerings primarily for physics 
majors. 

Introductory Courses (Core) 

PH 1 1 1 -1 1 2 Physics for the Curious I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is designed to introduce the non- 
technically oriented student to physics. Despite 
the fact that physics can most elegantly be de- 
scribed mathematically, this course emphasizes 
the concepts behind the equations. Shunning the 
math, a gut feeling for the concepts is developed 
in lieu of number-crunching solutions. The pur- 
pose is to broaden your thinking and to answer 
questions like: Why does a supertanker shut its 
engines off 16 miles from port? How do cats "al- 
ways" land on their feet? Why do ice cubes sink 
in an alcoholic drink? Why are steam radiators 
white? Why do birds not get electrocuted sitting 
on high-voltage wires? Why is the sky blue? 

David Broido 
Michael Graf 

PH 115-116 Structure of the Universe I, II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

An introductory course directed at non-science 
majors. Physical principles are developed and 
applied to our space and astrophysical environ- 
ment. Topics include: structure and evolution of 
the solar system, physics of the sun and planets, 
space discoveries, creation and structure of stars 
and galaxies, relativity and cosmology, extrater- 
restrial life, astronomical concepts. 

Krzysztof Kempa 

PH 1 30 Ideas of 20th-century Physics (S: 3) 

A course for non-science majors who wish to be- 
come conversant with some of the leading ideas 
in contemporary science that have had a major 
impact on the modern world, presented in a way 
that a non-mathematically inclined student can 
understand. Some of the topics covered include 
the new ideas of space and time in Einstein's rela- 
tivity, the nonintuitive concepts of causality in 
quantum physics, applications of these to atomic 
physics, nuclear weapons and nuclear power, and 
the highly exciting new discoveries and theories 
in space, such as pulsars, quasars, and black holes. 

Gabor Kalman 



PH 131 Development of Scientific Thought (F: 3) 

The objective of this course is to illuminate those 
concepts and views of the physical world that play 
so large a part in our lives. Starting with the 
contributions of the Greeks and bringing it up to 
the present, the course will outline the role of 
mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, physics, 
chemistry, biology and geology in the formation 
of our present view of the world about us and the 
view we have of ourselves. The course is open to 
all students; there are no prerequisites. The em- 
phasis will be on the concepts of the various sci- 
ences, not on their techniques. Rein A. Uritam 

PH 1 36 Space Exploration (F: 3) 

This course deals with Space Age discoveries. 
Satellites have been used to explore wide areas of 
the solar system and of deep space; the results 
from space missions and from dramatic develop- 
ments in ground based observational capabilities 
provide the basis of the course. Physical concepts 
are developed in context, with an historical per- 
spective provided from the ideas of the early as- 
tronomers and philosophers to the current space 
findings. Topics include the Sun-Earth system, 
including" solar flares, the solar wind, the mag- 
netosphere and auroras; comparative studies of 
the other planets; the Moon and planetary satel- 
lites; comets; X-ray, gamma ray and radio wave 
pictures of deep space. Robert L. Carovillano 

PH 171-172 Energy and the Environment, a 
Technoscientific Perspective I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

A course primarily for nonscience majors in which 
the cultural, historical and scientific origins of our 
contemporary technological society are explored; 
the fundamental principles of energy utilization 
examined; and the impact of technology on re- 
sources and the environment studied. Emphasis 
is on the people and processes of science-technol- 
ogy, and on the fundamental limitations to the 
availability of energy as a background to the in- 
vestigation of problems of population, resources, 
and pollution. Three lectures per week. 

Brian Boivlby 

PH 173-174 Nuclear Power and Nuclear 
Weapons I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will cover the basic physical principles 
and technology of nuclear reactors, nuclear power 
systems, and nuclear weapons. Emphasis will be 
on equipping each student to find a reasonable 
position between the poles of purely "pro" and 
purely "anti"; to acquire a sound understanding 
of the benefits and costs of nuclear power and 
nuclear weapons; to sort out the important dif- 
ferences between nuclear armaments policy and 
nuclear electric power policy; and to have respon- 
sible, well-informed, opinions on these critical 
issues. There are no science or math prerequi- 
sites. George Goldsmith 

PH 1 83-1 84 Foundations of Physics I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

An introduction to the principal concepts of clas- 
sical and modern physics. Elementary algebra is 
used in this course but emphasis is on physical 
understanding rather than mathematical manipu- 
lation. Topics include mechanics, electricity and 
magnetism, heat, sound, optics, and some revo- 
lutionary 20th century ideas in relativity and 
quantum physics and their application to the sub- 
atomic world. Recommended Laboratory (op- 
tional): PH 1 1 - 1 02 . Clyfe Bechvith 



84 • Coli it. i of Arts & Sciences • Physics 



PH 199 Special Projects (F: S) 

Individual programs of study and research under 
the direction of physics faculty members. Cred- 
its and requirements by arrangement with the 
approval of the Chairperson. The Department 

PH 209-210 Introductory Physics I, II (Calculus) 
(F: 4-S: 4) 

Prerequisite: MT 100-101 (may be taken concur- 
rently) 

A course primarily intended for those major- 
ing in the physical sciences. The principal areas 
of physics will be covered at the introductory level 
with an orientation toward future study of these 
areas. Primary emphasis will be on classical me- 
chanics and on electricity and magnetism, and also 
on wave phenomena, thermodynamics, kinetic 
theory, optics, and topics in modern physics. Four 
lectures per week. Recommended laboratory (op- 
tional): PH 203-204. Joseph Chen 

Michael Graf 

PH 21 1-212 Introduction to Physics I, II 
(Calculus) (F: 4-S: 4) 

Prerequisite: MT 100-101 (may be taken concur- 
rently) 

First semester: An introduction to classical 
mechanics, including Newton's laws, energy, an- 
gular motion, oscillations and gravitation; wave 
motion acoustics, the kinetic theory of gases and 
thermodynamics. Second semester: The funda- 
mentals of electricity and magnetism, electrical 
and magnetic properties of matter, electromag- 
netism, electromagnetic oscillations and waves, 
geometrical optics and optical instruments, the 
wave properties of light, and selected topics in 
modern physics. Four lectures per week. Recom- 
mended laboratory (optional): PH 203-204. 

Changgeng Du 
Francis A. Liuima, S.J. 

Laboratory Courses 

PH 101-102 Basic Laboratory I, II* (F: 1-S: 1) 

A course which provides laboratory demonstra- 
tion of physical principles and demands minimal 
use of mathematics in interpreting the results of 
experiments or demonstration experiments. One 
two-hour laboratory period per week. Lah fee pet- 
semester: $1 1 5.00 George Goldsmith 

PH 203-204 Introductory Physics Laboratory I, 
II* (F: 1-S: 1) 

A laboratory course which provides an opportu- 
nity to perform experiments on a wide range of 
topics in mechanics, electricity and magnetism, 
optics, acoustics, heat, and modern physics. One 
two-hour laboratory period per week. This lab is 
intended for students in PI 1 209-2 10 or PH 2 1 1- 
212. Lab fee per semester: $ 1 3 0.00 

George Goldsmith 

PH 405-406 Modern Laboratory Techniques I, 
ll» (F: 1-S: 1) 

Introduction to the methods of contemporary 
physics research; the use of meters, oscilloscopes, 
electrometers, photocells, vacuum apparatus, low 
temperature techniques, control circuitry, the 
application of microcomputers to measurement, 
circuit design and construction. Lab fee per semes- 
ter. $150.00 Hut Wang 



PH 535-536 Experiments in Physics I, II* 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Experiments in optics, solid state physics, nuclear 
physics, spectroscopy, x-ray and electron diffrac- 
tion. Students will carry out independent projects 
aimed at acquiring a sound understanding of both 
the physical principles involved in each subject 
area, and of the principles and problems of mod- 
ern experimental physics. 

Lab fee per sem ester: $150.00 George Goldsmith 

Pin Hong 

PH 538 Projects in Experimental Physics* (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of Chairperson 

A major individual research problem in an area 
such as atomic, nuclear, or solid state physics. 
Project approval must be obtained prior to the 
beginning of the semester, normally at the time 
of pre-registration. Lab fee per semester: $150.00 

The Department 

Electives (Primarily for Majors) 

PH 303 Introduction to Modern Physics I, II 
(F: 4-S: 4) 

A transition between introductory and advanced 
physics courses, for science majors. The basic 
subject matter includes the two principal physi- 
cal theories of the twentieth century, relativity and 
quantum mechanics. The Lorentz transforma- 
tion, kinematic consequences of relativity, origin 
of the quantum theory, one-dimensional quantum 
mechanics. Quantum mechanics of a particle in 
three dimensions. Applications to the hydrogen 
atom and to more complex atoms, molecules, 
crystals, metals, and semiconductors. 

David Broido 
Michael Graf 

PH 399 Scholar's Project (F: S) 

Reserved for physics majors selected as Scholars 
of the College. Content, requirements, and cred- 
its by arrangement with the approval of the chair- 
person. The Department 

PH 401 Mechanics (S: 4) 

Classical mechanics at the intermediate level. 
Particle dynamics and oscillations in one dimen- 
sion. Conservative forces. Conservation prin- 
ciples: energy, momentum, angular momentum. 
Particle dynamics, orbit theory, and stability for 
central forces; the Kepler problem; Rutherford 
scattering. Accelerating frames of reference. Rigid 
body dynamics. Introduction to Lagrange's equa- 
tions. Joseph Chen 

PH 402-403 Electricity and Magnetism I, II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Electricity and magnetism at the intermediate 
level. Electrostatics; Laplace's equation. 
Magnetostatics. Maxwell's equations; electromag- 
netic waves. Electron theory; dispersion; theory 
of the dielectric constant. Electromagnetic radia- 
tion. Joseph Chen 

PH 404 Spacetime Physics: Relativity 

The principle of relativity. The spacetime inter- 
val, proper time, the light cone. The Lorentz 
transformation, transformation properties of ki- 
nematic variables. Invariance and conservation 
laws. Collisions, binding energy of composite 
systems. Offered 1993-94 



PH 41 1 Atomic and Molecular Physics (F: 4) 

A course at the intermediate level: Simple and 
multi-electron atoms; Schrodinger equation; 
Pauli principle; atomic spectra, Zeeman and Stark 
effects; selection rules; x-rays; molecular physics. 

David Broido 

PH 412 Nuclei and Particles (S: 3) 

A course at the intermediate level: Structure of the 
nucleus. The neutron; the deuteron. Alpha decay; 
beta decay. Nuclear models. Nuclear reactions; 
collision theory. Nuclear forces. High energy 
physics; systematics and properties of elementary 
particles; symmetries. Rein Uritam 

PH 420 Statistical Mechanics and 
Thermodynamics (F: 3) 

The laws and theorems of thermodynamics. 
Revisibility and irreversibility. Change of phase. 
Entropy. Ideal gases and real gases. Maxwell- 
Boltzmann distribution. Fermi-Dirac statistics, 
Bose-Einstein statistics. Statistical basis of ther- 
modynamics. David Broido 

PH 425 Introduction to Solid State Physics (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 100-101; one year of physics 

A survey of solid state physics, including: crys- 
tal structure; phonons and lattice vibrations; band 
theory; thermal, optical, electrical and magnetic 
properties of solids and superconductivity. Physi- 
cal characterization of materials. Open to all sci- 
ence majors. Krzysztof Ken/pa 

PH 441 Optics 

A modern treatment of geometrical and physical 
optics, with emphasis on contemporary topics 
including applications. Optical systems, 
Frauenhofer and Fresnel diffraction, interference, 
polarization, Fourier transform spectroscopy, 
holographs, and lasers. Offered 1993-94 

PH 480 Introduction to Mathematical Physics 

(F:3) 

Determinants, matrices and their application to 
the solution of linear differential equations. Other 
areas to be studied are: Fourier series, Laplace and 
Fourier transforms. The Department 

PH 525 Plasma Physics (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: PH 402, MT 204 or 201 

An introduction to the study of many charged 
particle classical systems. Motions of single par- 
ticles. Plasma as a fluid. Interaction of plasma and 
waves. Properties of the plasma diffusion, resis- 
tivity and stability. Introduction to kinetic theory. 
Problems related to fusion. The Department 

PH 532 Senior Thesis (S: 3) 

A semester-long project in the course of which a 
student carries out investigation and research of 
an original nature or formulates a mature synthe- 
sis of a topic in physics. The results are presented 
as a written thesis, which the student will defend 
in an oral examination. Highly recommended for 
majors considering graduate study in physics. 

Rein A. Uritam 

PH 599 Readings and Research in Physics (F, S) 

Individual programs of study and research for 
advanced physics majors under the direction of a 
physics faculty member. Credits and require- 
ments by arrangement with the approval of the 
Chairperson. The Department 



College of Arts & Sciences • Political Science 



85 



Political Science 



FACULTY 

Peter S. H. Tang, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Na- 
tional Chengchih University; A.M., Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia University 

Christopher J. Bruell, Professor; A.B., Cornell 
University; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Robert K. Faulkner, Professor; A.B., 
Dartmouth College; A.B., Oxford University; 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Donald L. Hafher, Professor; A.B., Kalamazoo 
College; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Marc K. Landy, Professor; A.B., Oberlin Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Harvard University 

David Lowenthal, Professor; A.B., Brooklyn 
College; B.S., New York University; A.M., 
Ph.D., New School for Social Research 

Marvin C. Rintala, Professor; A.B., University 
of Chicago; A.M., Ph.D., Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy 

Kay L. Schlozman, Professor; A.B., Wellesley 
College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

William Schneider, O'Neill Professor B.A., 
Brandeis College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Robert Scigliano, Professor; A.B., A.M., Uni- 
versity of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 

Donald S. Carlisle, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Brown University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

David A. Deese, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Dartmouth College; M.A., M.A.L.D., Ph.D., 
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy 

Dennis Hale, Associate Professor, Chairperson of 
the Department; A.B., Oberlin College; Ph.D., 
City University 

David R. Manwaring, Associate Professor; A.B., 
A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin 

Susan M. Shell, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Cornell University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

John T. Tierney, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Kenji Hayao, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Dartmouth College; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor 

Duane Oldfield, Assistant Professor; B.A., Reed 
College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California 

Robert S. Ross, Assistant Professor; B.A., Tufts 
University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Students majoring in Political Science are pre- 
pared for political and administrative careers, for- 
eign service, law, journalism, graduate work, and 
teaching in the social sciences. 



Requirements: Majors are normally to take 
Fundamental Concepts of Politics (2 semesters) 
as the first course. At least 8 electives are to be 
taken, including one from each subfield: Ameri- 
can Government, Comparative Government, 
Political Theory and International Politics. 

Departmental Honors 

The Department of Political Science sponsors an 
honors program for a small number of junior and 
senior majors. Admission to the honors program 
is by invitation of the Department on the basis of 
GPA in the major and overall GPA. 

Students in the honors program are also ex- 
pected to take a total of two honors seminars dur- 
ing their junior and senior years, in addition to 
the 10 courses required for the major. These 
seminars, considered electives in the major, do not 
exempt students from the requirement of taking 
one course in each of four subfields. Honors semi- 
nars receive a special designation on the tran- 
script. 

To graduate with one of the two highest lev- 
els of departmental honors, students must com- 
plete twelve courses within the Department, in- 
cluding two honors seminars, and must write an 
honors thesis. The level of departmental honors 
depends upon the quality of work in the thesis, 
the honors seminars, and courses in general. Stu- 
dents who opt not to write the thesis but who have 
taken twelve courses and demonstrated excellence 
in the major and in the two honors seminars, are 
eligible for the lowest level of departmental hon- 
ors. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Core Courses: Introductory 

For freshmen and sophomores; juniors and se- 
niors by department permission only. Note: These 
are the only departmental courses open to fresh- 
men. 

PO 041-042 Fundamental Concepts of Politics 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Introduction to governments, political ideas and 
theories, and the study of politics. For majors 
only. Counts toward Core requirement. 

Kathleen Bailey 

Christopher Bruell 

Kenji Hayao 

Stephen Knott 

Marc Landy 

John Tieniey 

Duane Oldfield 

PO 061 American Politics: The Organization of 
Power (F: 3) 

This course examines how constitutional struc- 
ture and procedure operate to allocate power and 
influence among competing interests in society. 
Stress is on those aspects of the system that make 
it work the way it does, and on the moral pros and 
cons of both process and results. PO 061 is not 
open to students who have taken PO 024. Counts 
towards Core requirement. For non-majors. 

David R. Manwaring 



PO 062 American Politics: Major Issues of 
Public Policy (S: 3) 

A survey of public policies in selected areas (in- 
cluding monopoly control, labor-management 
relations, protection and promotion of civil rights, 
land and water management, social welfare, de- 
livery of health and education services). Exami- 
nation of cultural, social and political factors will 
attempt to demonstrate how public policies are 
defined, resolved and administered, and by whom. 
Counts towards Core requirement. For non-majors. 

Marie Natoli 

PO 071 Political Classics (S: 3) 

A one-semester introduction to the study of po- 
litical matters through the careful analysis and 
discussion of several outstanding writings, ancient 
and modern. Special emphasis is given to the 
problem of determining the nature, aim and forms 
of the political community. Readings will be 
drawn from Plato, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Ba- 
con, Locke, Lincoln, Marx, Churchill, Orwell. 
The class will divide into small discussion sections 
on Friday. Counts toward Core requirement. Non- 
majors only. David Lowenthal 

PO 080 (HS 272) Introduction to Russian, 
Soviet and East European Studies (F: 3) 

This course provides the student with the key 
themes, theories and approaches necessary for 
further detailed study of Russia, the former 
USSR, and the East European states. The major 
findings and methods used by specialists in vari- 
ous disciplines will be previewed and presented. 
Open to freshmen and sophomores. Juniors and 
seniors by permission only. Counts toward Social 
Science Core requirement. (May receive Politi- 
cal Science or History credit: for History credit, 
History Core is prerequisite, but may be taken si- 
multaneously.) DonaldS. Carlisle 

Raymond T. McNally 

Special Undergraduate Courses 

PO 281 or 282 Individual Research in Political 
Science (F, S: 3) 

One semester of research under the supervision 
of a member of the Department, culminating in 
a long paper or some equivalent. Permission of 
instructor required. The Department 

PO 291-292 Honors Thesis in Political Science 

(F, S: 3) The Department 

PO 295-296 Honors Seminar (F: 3-S: 3) 

Undergraduate Electives 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. 

Undergraduate seminars, listed at the end of 
each of the four fields, meet once a week and are 
limited to 20 students. Prerequisite: Junior stand- 
ing or higher. 

American Politics 

PO 303 The Modern Presidency (F: 3) 

An investigation of the development of the Presi- 
dency in the twentieth century. Special attention 
will be given to the manner in which the activist 
presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to Ronald 
Reagan have attempted to reconcile the role of 



86 



Coi legi of Arts & Sciences • Poi 1 1 k w. Science 



domestic steward with that of world leader. Note: 
Not open to students who have taken PC) 317. 

MarcLandy 

PO 308 Public Administration (S: 3) 

This course will be devoted to the examination of 
the behavior of public administrative agencies at 
all levels of government, with a focus on the fed- 
eral bureaucracy. Among the topics covered are: 
theories of organization and administration; lead- 
ership; communication; budgeting; administrative 
law; personnel practices; public unionism. Among 
the major themes of this course are the following: 
Is there an American science of administration? 
What is the relationship between a country's ad- 
ministrative culture and its political culture? What 
is bureaucracy for, and where did it come from? 
Are the sins of bureaucracy inevitable, or can 
bureaucracy be reformed to make it easier to live 
with? Dennis Hale 

PO 309 Congressional Politics and 
Policymaking (F: 3) 

The course examines the U.S. Congress from an 
institutional perspective. Major points of empha- 
sis include: the historical evolution of the Con- 
gress and its principal institutional changes; the 
political environment in which Members of Con- 
gress operate (focusing on congressional elections 
and on legislators' relations with their constitu- 
ents, with executive branch officials, and with rep- 
resentatives of organized interests). The course 
also examines the institutional structures and be- 
havioral patterns that shape the legislative process: 
the leadership and the parties; the organization 
and operation of congressional committees; floor 
procedures and norms; the growth and profes- 
sionalization of congressional staff; and the bud- 
getary process. Finally, the course examines dif- 
ferent perspectives on congressional policymak- 
ing. John Tierney 

PO 310 Politics and the Administration of 
Justice (S: 3) 

This course offers an intensive treatment of le- 
gal, political and moral issues in the American 
system of criminal justice, with particular empha- 
sis on the constitutional rights of criminal defen- 
dants and various factors (congestion, plea- 
bargaining, etc.) which affect the viability of those 
rights. David R. Manwaring 

PO 31 1 Urban Politics (S: 3) 

This is a general survey of the political institu- 
tions, decision-making processes, and public poli- 
cies of urban areas. Among the topics treated are: 
the economic and political development of the 
urban community; the nature of political cleav- 
age and conflict in urban areas; the institutions 
and decision-making processes of urban govern- 
ments; the public policies of the cities; and an 
assessment of political alternatives for the govern- 
ing of urban areas. Duane Oldjield 

PO 317 The American Presidency (F: 3) 

This course will focus on the historical develop- 
ment of the American presidency. Special atten- 
tion will be given to the founding period, the 
presidencies of Andrew Jackson and Abraham 
Lincoln, and the rise of the 20th century activist 
presidents. Additionally, the course will examine 
presidential emergency power and the constitu- 
tional questions which arise from the use of this 
power. Stephen Knott 



PO 319 National Security Policy (F: 3) 

An analysis of basic security policy issues facing 
the United States in the post-Cold War world, 
with a focus on such contemporary issues as: the 
connection between military and economic secu- 
rity; the spread of sophisticated weaponry to more 
and more nations; the appropriate role of covert 
action and intelligence services; and the prospects 
of enhancing U.S. security through arms control 
and other cooperative international efforts. (Ful- 
fills departmental distributional requirement in 
either American or International Politics.) 

Donald L. Hafner 

PO 320 Social Movements and American 
Politics (S: 3) 

Social movements have played a critical role in 
American politics, bringing previously unheard 
constituencies and demands to the fore, upsetting 
pre-existing political arrangements, and reshap- 
ing the political landscape. This course will com- 
bine examination of particular social movements 
(including the Civil Rights movement, the Chris- 
tian Right, and the Gay and Lesbian Rights move- 
ment) with more general theoretical analysis. Key 
questions to be considered include: Why do so- 
cial movements arise? What factors account for 
their success (or failure)? How receptive is the 
American political system to movement influ- 
ence? Duane Oldfield 

PO 321 American Constitutional Law (F: 3) 

The evolution of the American Constitution 
through Supreme Court decisions is studied, with 
emphasis on the nature and limits of judicial 
power, and the Court's special role as protector 
of individual rights. David R. Manwaring 

PO 323 Tocqueville on France and America (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Ability to read and speak French. 

The course will be conducted in French. It 
will mostly take up Tocqueville's writings on the 
French Revolution and French politics during the 
first half of the 19th century and on American 
democracy as he found it in his travels in the 
United States in the 1830s. Some current read- 
ings on French and American politics will bring 
Tocqueville's accounts down to date. 

Robert Scigliano 

PO 329 American Political Ideas and Institutions 

(S:3) 

The course has two themes: basic ideas underly- 
ing American political institutions, and defenses 
and critiques of those institutions. The first theme 
is examined in some of the writings of Jefferson 
and Lincoln, and the second theme is examined, 
more extensively, in The Federalist and works by 
Walter Bagehot, Woodrow Wilson, Charles 
Beard, and a contemporary author. 

Robert Scigliano 

PO 330 The Politics of Health Care Policy (S: 3) 

This course considers how and why health policy 
issues become political issues and how federal 
health care policy has developed programmati- 
cally over the past 3 5 years, focusing on: biomedi- 
cal research, Medicare and Medicaid, health 
maintenance organizations, health planning and 
regulation, and hospital cost containment. In our 
examination of each program area, we shall con- 
cern ourselves principally with the politics of con- 
gressional action, but shall also examine the role 



of interest groups, presidents, and executive agen- 
cies in shaping these policies. John Tierney 

PO 339 (EC 359) Economics and Politics of the 
Environment (S: 3) 

This course examines environmental issues from 
the perspectives of both economics and political 
science. A wide variety of specific environmental 
issues will be addressed, including hazardous 
waste, air and water pollution control, global cli- 
mate change, wilderness preservation, and land 
use. For each issue we will analyze both the po- 
litical and the economic factors that affect envi- 
ronmental policy formation and implementation. 

Marc Landy 
Stephen Polasky 

PO 344 American Legal System (S: 3) 

A comprehensive survey. Topics include: histori- 
cal origins and basic philosophy; American courts 
and legal procedure; lawyers and the legal profes- 
sion; modern comparisons (Britain and France); 
legal reasoning (common law precedent, statutory 
interpretation); some substantive manifestations 
(torts, contracts, property); and current weak- 
nesses and unsolved problems (congestion and 
delay, legal ethics, etc.). David R. Manwaring 

PO 349 (CO 290) Politics and the Media (F: 3) 

An analysis of the mass media's impact on the 
workings of the American political system. Ex- 
plored will be such topics as the media's interac- 
tion with political institutions, its role in cam- 
paigning, its use by office holders and politicians, 
its effect upon recent events in the political arena, 
e.g., its treatment of terrorism, violence, riots, etc. 

Marie Natoli 

PO 355-356 Internship Seminar: Policy and 
Administration in State and Local Government 
(F, S: 6) 

A program of study based upon work experience 
in legislative, executive, and administrative offices 
in Greater Boston. The formulation of policy, the 
nature of responsibility, and the role of bureau- 
cracy in state and local communities will be ex- 
amined with the help of public officials of those 
communities. 

Admission to this course is by application only. 
Juniors and seniors are selected on a competitive 
basis, based on their fitness for assignment to 
public offices. Marie Natoli 

PO 362 Seminar: Political Economy and Public 
Policy (S: 3) 

This seminar examines the contribution of a se- 
lected group of contemporary economists to de- 
bates about the purposes of public policy and the 
appropriate means for achieving those purposes. 
Specific topics to be analyzed include: economic 
growth; regulation of business; planning; infla- 
tion; income redistribution and the public use of 
private incentives. Marc Landy 

PO 376 Seminar: Current Constitutional Issues 

(F:3) 

An examination of major controversies regarding 
the constitutional roles of American courts. Ten- 
tative topics include judicial activism/creativeness 
vs. "original intent" interpretivism; jurisdiction, 
congestion and the problem of access; the 
Reagan/Burger "counterrevolution" in civil lib- 
erties; the rebirth as issues of state rights and eco- 
nomic liberty. David R. Manwaring 



College of Arts & Sciences • Political Science 



87 



PO 380 Seminar: Covert Action and American 
Democracy (F: 3) 

This seminar examines the use of covert opera- 
tions from the founding of the United States to 
the rise of the Central Intelligence Agency. The 
course will review a number of case studies involv- 
ing use of these operations, including some con- 
troversial operations from the recent past. These 
cases will highlight the difficulties involved in 
balancing the need for secrecy in foreign 
policymaking with the need for openness and 
accountability in a democracy. Stephen Knott 

Comparative Politics 

PO 405 Politics in Western Europe (F: 3) 

A comparative analysis of political thought, ac- 
tion, and organization in Britain and France. 
Serves as an introduction to the study of compara- 
tive politics. Counts toward Core requirement. 

Marvin Rintala 

PO 406 Politics in Western Europe (S: 3) 

A comparative analysis of political thought, ac- 
tion, and organization in Germany, Sweden, and 
Switzerland. Serves as an introduction to the study 
of comparative politics. Counts toward Core re- 
quirement. Marvin Rintala 

PO 409 Soviet Politics: From Lenin to Yelsin 
(F:3) 

This course will analyze the various stages in the 
life-cycle of the Soviet political system, from its 
origins in 1917 through its collapse in 1991. 
Throughout, special emphasis in the investigation 
will be placed on top leadership politics, the com- 
munist elite's changing composition, and the 
population's ethnic make-up. The central "main- 
spring" role of the Communist Party in sustain- 
ing the system will be examined. Stalin and 
Stalinism is considered in relation to the problems 
of consolidating and maintaining a one-party dic- 
tatorship. 

The so-called "Dilemma of the Reforming 
Despot" is central to the analysis of the 
Khrushchev and Brezhnev Eras, and patterns of 
reform and reaction will be treated in this fash- 
ion. Gorbachev's and Yelsin's roles in the demise 
of the USSR will be studied in detail; finally, the 
nationality problems that sealed the Soviet 
Union's fate will have a prominent place in our 
analysis of the system's disintegration during 
1991. Donald S. Carlisle 

PO 416 Introduction to Chinese Politics (S: 3) 

This course treats of the People's Republic of 
China after 1949. The focus is on political insti- 
tutions, the policy-making process, and state-so- 
ciety relations. The course also includes a brief 
introduction to Chinese foreign policy. 
Not open to those who have taken PO 410. 

Robert S. Ross 

PO 41 7 Government and Politics of Japan (S: 3) 

This course offers an overview of contemporary 
Japanese politics, designed for students with a 
general interest in Japan as well as political sci- 
ence concentrators. It begins with a brief histori- 
cal account, and proceeds to discussions of Japa- 
nese culture and society, electoral politics, deci- 
sion-making structures and processes, and pub- 
lic policy issues in both domestic and foreign af- 
fairs. Kenji Hayao 



PO 423 From Empires to Nations (S: 3) 

Analyses of the emergence, maintenance and de- 
cline of the major imperial systems. The bureau- 
cratic empires of antiquity, including the Chinese 
and Roman enterprises, will be treated. Modern 
continental empires such as the Austro-Hungar- 
ian and Russian will be dealt with, as well as the 
British and French overseas imperial experiences. 
Contemporary problems, including Soviet and 
American issues and the emergent nation-states 
of the so-called Third World, will be discussed. 

Donald S. Carlisle 

PO 431 Rebellion and Revolution in the Middle 
East, 1881-1992 (S: 3) 

This course will investigate the origins and evo- 
lution of rebellions and revolutionary movements 
in the Middle East. Among the topics to be dis- 
cussed are the nature of revolutionary change, the 
effects of colonialism and Western economic pen- 
etration on Middle Eastern politics, the bases and 
nature of popular resistance, the relationship be- 
tween revolutionary movements and social 
change in the Middle East, and revolutionary ide- 
ologies. Examples will include the 'Urabist Revolt 
in Egypt, the Ottoman and Iranian constitutional 
revolutions, popular resistance to French and 
British colonial policy in the post- World War I 
period, the Turkish revolution, the Palestine 
Rebellion of 1936-39, Nasserism, the Algerian 
revolution, the Iranian revolution, the Intifada, 
and the Islamicist challenge to current regimes. 

James Gelvin 

PO 441 Politics and Society in Western Europe 

(F:3) 

This course presents evaluation of the relative 
political significance of language, social class, gen- 
erational and religious similarities and differ- 
ences in Western Europe. Marvin Rintala 

PO 442 The Political Institutions of Western 
Europe (S: 3) 

A comparison of the functions and forms of suf- 
frage, electoral systems (single-member districts 
or proportional representation), parties and party 
systems, legislatures, executives, types of states 
(parliamentary or presidential, republican or 
monarchical) in Western Europe. The final insti- 
tution considered will be the state. 

Marvin Rintala 

PO 461 Seminar: Power and Personality (S: 3) 

This seminar examines both the significance of 
personality in seeking, exercising, and losing 
power and the significance of seeking, exercising, 
and losing power for personality. Class discussion 
will focus first on certain analytical, including 
psychoanalytical, hypotheses about the relation- 
ship between power and personality, then on ap- 
plying and testing these hypotheses in 
psychobiographies of particular powerful persons 
such as Woodrow Wilson, Winston Churchill, 
and Adolf Hitler, and finally on student research 
projects. Marvin Rintala 

International Politics 

PO 501 International Politics (F: 3) 

The nation-state system, its principles of opera- 
tion and the bases of national power and policy 
are examined. This course serves as an introduc- 
tion to the study of international politics. 

Donald L. Hafner 



PO 504 International Politics of Europe (S: 3) 

An analysis of the main currents of international 
relations among European nations in recent de- 
cades, focusing particularly on the rise of Europe 
as a major international actor and the problems 
of building a new European community follow- 
ing the demise of the Soviet Union." 

Donald L. Hafner 

PO 506 Soviet Foreign Policy (S: 3) 

In this course Soviet international behavior will 
be treated in terms of three sectors: 1) policy to- 
ward the West; 2) policy regarding non-Commu- 
nist underdeveloped countries; and 3) policy to- 
ward other Communist states and non-ruling 
Communist parties. Topics such as Comintern, 
Socialism in One Country, the Soviet Bloc, the 
Cold War, Peaceful Coexistence, and Polycen- 
trism, as well as other contemporary international 
problems will be considered. Donald S. Carlisle 

PO 5 1 4 Great and Local Powers in East Asia (F: 3) 

Introduction to international relations of East 
Asia since World War II, with a focus on the di- 
plomacy of Japan, China, and other powers and 
the emergence and resolution of regional con- 
flicts, including the Korean and Vietnam wars. 

Robert S. Ross 

PO 516 American Foreign Policy (S: 3) 

This course will examine the distinctive ways in 
which the American public and policy-makers 
have understood and applied principles of inter- 
national politics during our nation's history. The 
domestic political as well as the intellectual foun- 
dations of American international behavior will be 
studied. Donald L. Hafner 

PO 51 7 Middle East World Affairs I (F: 3) 

This course will trace the roots of contemporary 
Middle Eastern politics by looking at the evolu- 
tion of the "Near Eastern Question" and Middle 
Eastern politics and society until 1918. Among 
topics to be considered: great power rivalry and 
diplomacy, empire vs. state, the economic 
peripheralization of the region, Islamic reform, 
the origins of nationalism, intellectual trends. 

James Gelvin 

PO 520 (EC 396) (HS 192) (RL 300) The 
European Experience (Summer: 3) 

This interdisciplinary course is taught by Profes- 
sors David Deese, Political Science, Jeffrey Howe, 
Fine Arts, Frank Murphy, History, Robert 
Murphy, Economics, and a wide range of officials 
from the European Community and professors 
from the University of Louvain. The thematic 
focus is the European Community's single inter- 
nal market. Students live and attend classes at the 
Irish Institute of European Affairs in Louvain, 
which is a 20-minute train ride northeast of Brus- 
sels, Belgium. 

An introductory unit maps the historical and 
cultural roots of the European Community. The 
second unit reviews the economics of integration 
and the process of forging a single monetary sys- 
tem in the Community. A third section analyzes 
the political roots and motivations of the Com- 
munity, the institutions and legal process, and 
likely dimensions of future integration, including 
the common foreign policy and the entrance of 
new member states. The final unit surveys se- 
lected art and architecture of Belgium and Eu- 



88 • College of Arts & Sciences • Political Science 



rope, including guided tours of museums, 
churches, and other art and architectural treasures 
in the towns and cities of Belgium and its sur- 
roundings. Classes in various European languages 
are also offered and encouraged. David A. Deese 

PO 525 Introduction to International Political 
Economy (F: 3) 

Reviews the three contending classical approaches 
to the study of international political economy: 
liberalism, Marxism and mercantilism. Focuses on 
international trade, finance and the multinational 
corporation, and the underlying theory of inter- 
national regimes. Extends the examination of the 
specific issues involved in East- West and North- 
South relations. Demonstrates and integrates the 
key theory and trends from the course through 
applied analysis of the continuing oil crisis and 
evolution in world energy markets. 

David A. Deese 

PO 526 International and Comparative Political 
Economy II (S: 3) 

Offers students with prior coursework in interna- 
tional politics or political economy the opportu- 
nity to explore broad theoretical questions in in- 
ternational political economy. Applies emerging 
theory and modern history to the questions of 
America's international position in the late twen- 
tieth century. Explores possible patterns in the 
rise and decline of empires and preeminent na- 
tions; lessons from periods of British preponder- 
ance; extent of current U.S. decline and implica- 
tions for peaceful change and war in the interna- 
tional system. Not open to those who have taken 
PO 538. David A. Deese 

PO 553 Seminar: U.S.-Japan Relations (F: 3) 

How the current crisis in the U.S.-Japan relation- 
ship is handled is likely to affect people across the 
globe. This course analyzes the important fac- 
tors — historical, strategic, economic, and politi- 
cal — affecting the current relationship and then 
considers how the relationship can and should be 
handled in the future. Kenji Hayao 

PO 556 Seminar: International Peace and War 
in the 1990s (S: 3) 

This seminar surveys some of the classic work on 
the relationship between politics and war, high- 
lighting insights of continuing relevance in the 
twentieth century. The core units focus on the 
causes of conflict and paths to reducing the num- 
ber and intensity of international wars. Selected 
case studies include World War I, Vietnam, the 
Middle East in 1967 and 1973, Afghanistan, 1980- 
1989; Iran-Iraq, 1981-1988; and the Iraq-U.S./ 
Coalition War of 1 99 1 . The conclusion addresses 
the creation of conditions and institutions for 
peace and conflict management in the 1990s. 

David A. Deese 

PO 563 Seminar: Chinese Foreign Policy (S: 3) 

This course is a comprehensive analysis of the 
People's Republic of China's foreign policy since 
1949. It focuses on the historical, international, 
and domestic sources of Chinese policy towards 
the superpowers and towards its Asian neighbors. 
The course also covers the instruments of Chi- 
nese foreign policy, including use of force and 
economic diplomacy. Robert S. Ross 



Political Theory 

PO 606 Foundations of Modern Political 
Philosophy (F: 3) 

An introductory consideration of a few seminal 
views. In 1992-93 the course will glance at the 
post-modernist critique of modern life, by Fou- 
cault and Heidegger, and then reconsider the 
stages in the development of modern thought 
articulated by Nietzsche, Kant, and Machiavelli. 

Robert K. Faulkner 

PO 608 Introduction to Political Philosophy (S: 3) 

Can one know what is good and what is the best 
political order? A careful consideration of a few 
leading inquiries, especially in shorter writings of 
Plato, Machiavelli, and recent political thinkers. 

Robert K. Faulkner 

PO 619 Fundamentals of Classical Political 
Philosophy (F: 3) 

The course will provide a comparison of ancient 
and modern politics; readings from Plato's Laws, 
Montesquieu's Spirit of the Laws, and Mark 
Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's 
Court. With the collapse of communism, we need 
another reference point for understanding the 
essential features of our politics. This reference 
point is supplied by the ancient politics which our 
modern politics replaced. Christopher J. Bruell 

PO 627 Shakespeare's Political Wisdom I (F: 3) 

Four of Shakespeare's best-known plays studied 
to discover his understanding of political life. 

David Lowenthal 

PO 628 Shakespeare's Political Wisdom II (S: 3) 

Four other Shakespearian plays studied with care. 
This course can be taken independently of PO 
627. David Lowenthal 

PO 631 Ethics and Politics (S: 3) 

What's good and what good is it in politics: A 
consideration of the shape and possibility of a just 
political order and of whether it can adequately 
encompass what is good. Readings and discussion 
will touch contemporary proposals and discuss a 
very few major alternatives selected from novel- 
ists, playwrights, and philosophers such as 
Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edward Bellamy, Francis 
Bacon, Swift, Shakespeare, Aristotle, Plato, 
Locke, Nietzsche, and Mill. Robert K. Faulkner 

PO 641 Models of Political Phenomena (F: 3) 

This course provides an introduction to thinking 
analytically about human behavior by exposing 
students to various styles of constructing and test- 
ing models of political phenomena. It looks at a 
number of the intellectual tools that have been 
used to represent political and social processes. 
The emphasis is on improving students' skills in 
thinking about individual and collective behavior 
through the use of a few simple concepts and some 
imagination. Kenji Hayao 

PO 644 Individual and Community (F: 3) 

An introduction to various ways in which the re- 
lation between the individual and the larger po- 
litical order has been conceived. Readings to in- 
clude both classical and more recent works of 
philosophy and literature. Susan Shell 

PO 645 Kant's Political Thought (S: 3) 

A study of the political philosophy of Kant and 
its bearing on American political thought and 



practice. Part of the course will be devoted to 
various recent attempts to reconceive and/or re- 
vive American liberalism along Kantian lines. 

Susan Shell 

PO 658 Seminar: Machiavelli's Prince and 
Plays (S: 3) 

A study of Mandragola, Clizia, and The Prince. 

Robert Faulkner 

PO 659 Seminar: Edmund Burke and Modern 
Conservatism (F: 3) 

A study of the thought of Edmund Burke, the 
father of modern conservatism, using some of his 
main writings. David Lowenthal 

PO 666 Seminar: Politics, Art and Literature: 
The Russian Experience (S: 3) 

Central attention in this seminar is directed to the 
role of the intellectual, especially the writer and 
artist, in Russian and Soviet history. The inter- 
action of culture and politics will be examined. 
The unfolding of the Russian political mind will 
be traced through Muscovy, the Tsarist and So- 
viet periods. Major focus in the course will be on 
the emergence and transformation of the Russian 
intelligentsia as reflected in political thought, lit- 
erature, and the arts. 

Some of the individuals who will be dealt with 
are: Rublov, Pushkin, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, 
Gorky, Lenin, Trotsky, Zamiatin, Eisenstein, 
Pasternak, and Solzhenitsyn. Donald S. Carlisle 

The following courses are offered by the De- 
partment on a recurring basis; consult the instruc- 
tor for information about each course. 

PO 302 American National Government 

Robert Scigliano 

PO 306 Parties and Elections in America 

Kay L. Schlozman 

PO 3 1 2 Women in Politics Kay L. Schlozman 

PO 316 Topics in American Politics: The Presi- 
dent, Congress and the War Power 

Robert Scigliano 

PO 3 1 7 American Presidency Robert Scigliano 

PO 332 The "Great Rights": The First Amend- 
ment and American Democracy 

David R. Manwaring 

PO 334 Politics of Environment Marc Landy 

PO 336 Pressure Groups: Organized Interests in 
American Democracy Kay L. Schlozman 

PO 337 Judicial Process Robert Scigliano 

PO 340 Public Policy Marc Landy 

PO 341 20th-century American Political Thought 

Dennis Hale 

PO 343 Politics and Inequality Kay L. Schlozman 

PO 347 Administrative Politics and Policymaking 

John Tiemey 

PO 348 Representation/Citizenship Robert Scigliano 

PO 353 Seminar: Executive Politics and 
Policymaking John Tiemey 

PO 364 Seminar: The New Deal and the 
Transformation of American Politics Marc Landy 

PO 368 Seminar: Legislative-Executive 
Policymaking John Tierney 

PO 379 Seminar: Current Constitutional Issues II 

David R. Manwaring 

PO 422 Crisis Politics: Violence, Revolution and 
War DonaldS. Carlisle 

PO 439 Leadership in Europe Marvin Rintala 



College of Arts & Sciences • Psychology • 89 



PO 440 The National Character of Politics 

Marvin Rintala 

PO 462 Seminar: Parties and Party Systems 

Marvin Rintala 

PO 527 Comparative Foreign Policy of Developed 
and Developing Nations David A. Deese 

PO 561 Seminar: Theory in International Politics 

David A. Deese 

PO 601 Introduction to History of Political 
Philosophy Susan Shell 

PO 604 Problems of Liberal Society 

David Lowenthal 

PO 607 Democracy: Kinds, Promise, Problems 

Robert K. Faulkner 



PO 609 American Political Thought 

Robert K. Faulkner 

PO 612 Political Philosophy of Plato 

Christopher J. Bruell 

PO 61 3 Marx Susan Shell 

PO 614 Rousseau Susan Shell 

PO 615 Socrates and Athens Christopher J '. Bruell 

PO 616 Modern Political Theory Susan Shell 

PO 621 Topics in Classical Political Philosophy 

Christopher J. Bruell 

PO 623 Politics and Education David Lowenthal 

PO 624 Political Thought of Abraham Lincoln 

David Lowenthal 



PO 634 Contemporary Political Theory Susan Shell 

PO 638 Political Idealism Susan Shell 

PO 639 DeTocqueville's Democracy in America 

David Lowenthal 

PO 643 Edmund Burke and Modern Conservatism 

David Lowenthal 

PO 654 Seminar: The Political Philosophy of 
Hegel Susan Shell 

PO 656 Seminar: Plutarch's Lives David Lowenthal 



Psycho 



o g y 



FACULTY 

Marc A. Fried, Professor Emeritus; B.S., City 
College of New York; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity 

Murray Horwitz, Professor Emeritus; B.S.S., 
City College of New York; Ph.D., University 
of Michigan 

Ali Banuazizi, Professor; B.S., University of 
Michigan; A.M., The New School for Social 
Research; Ph.D., Yale University 

Randolph Easton, Professor, Chairperson of the 
Depaitment; B.S., University of Washington; 
A.M., Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

Marianne LaFrance, Professor; A.B., Univer- 
sity of Windsor; A.M., Ph.D., Boston Univer- 
sity 

G. Ramsay Liem, Professor; A.B., Haverford 
College; Ph.D., University of Rochester 

Michael Numan, Professor; B.S., Brooklyn Col- 
lege; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

William Ryan, Professor; A.B., Ph.D., Boston 
University 

Ellen Winner, Professor; A.B., Radcliffe Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Daniel J. Baer, Associate Professor; A.B., LaSalle 
College; A.M., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Norman H. Berkowitz, Associate Professor; 
A.B., University of Massachusetts at Amherst; 
A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 

Hiram H. Brownell, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University 

Donnah Canavan, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Emmanuel College; Ph.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity 

Peter Gray, Associate Professor; A.B., Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Rockefeller University 

Michael Moore, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Karen Schneider-Rosen, Associate Professor; 
B.A., Brandeis University; Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity 



M.Jeanne Sholl, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Bucknell University; M.S., Idaho State Univer- 
sity; A.M., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Joseph J. Tecce, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Bowdoin College; M.A., Ph.D., Catholic Uni- 
versity of America 

Gilda A. Morelli, Assistant Professor; B.SC, 
University of Massachusetts, Boston; Ph.D., 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Nadim Rouhana, Assistant Professor; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Haifa; M.A., University of Western 
Australia; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Kavitha Srinivas, Assistant Professor; B.A., Ban- 
galore University; M.S., Purdue University; 
Ph.D., Rice University 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The undergraduate program in Psychology is 
designed to meet the needs of three classes of stu- 
dents: a) those who wish a sound cultural back- 
ground in the study of behavior; b) those who wish 
to acquire a thorough undergraduate training in 
psychology, as majors, in anticipation of profes- 
sional graduate study; and c) those who wish a 
basic understanding of human behavior as a 
supplement to some other major field of concen- 
tration. 

The Psychology Department urges its majors 
to seek Psychology faculty advisement prior to 
each University Registration period and Psychol- 
ogy faculty provide expanded office hours for this 
purpose. 

Students majoring in Psychology must meet 
the following requirements: 

1 . Introduction to Psychology, taken as soon 
as possible after entering the major. These 
courses — Introductory Psychology I (PS 073) and 
Introductory Psychology II (PS 074) — may be 
taken in either order. 

2. Statistics (PS 190) in their second or third 
year. 

3. One of the various research practica in ei- 
ther their third or fourth year. (See 300-level 
courses, below.) 

Each research practicum course satisfies the 
departmental research methods requirement. 



Under faculty supervision, students will be ex- 
pected to complete a research study or a more lim- 
ited series of research exercises. Through such 
activities, students will participate in hypothesis 
development and testing, the development of a 
research design, the construction and/or applica- 
tion of measurement procedures, data analysis, 
and the reporting of research findings. Course 
requirements include writing a research proposal 
and a final research report. In addition, all stu- 
dents will either participate in or attend a Psychol- 
ogy Department Research Conference each se- 
mester. Although the practicum courses all share 
these learning objectives, the substantive theoreti- 
cal focus of each differs to permit the student to 
engage in research in an area of high interest. 
Each practicum presumes knowledge of theories 
relevant to its special focus. For this reason, dif- 
ferent prerequisites are specified for each. Classes 
will be limited to twenty. 

4. At least one elective from the following: 
Sensory Psychology (PS 140), Perception (PS 
143), Learning (PS 144), Cognitive Psychology 
(PS 147), Physiological Psychology (PS 150), or 
Evolution of Behavior (PS 270). 

5. At least one elective from the following 
group: Personality Theories (PS 101), Social Psy- 
chology (PS 131), Developmental Psychology (PS 
136), Abnormal Psychology (PS 139), or Cross- 
cultural Psychology (PS 145). 

6. Two additional electives, for a minimum of 
eight Psychology courses. Courses designed pri- 
marily for nonmajors (those with numbers below 
070) are not to be included among the eight 
counted toward a major. 

7. In addition, Psychology majors must take 
two departmentally approved courses in math- 
ematics (MT 004-005, MT 014-015, MT 100- 
1 1 , or any two MT courses above MT 1 00- 101, 
with the permission of the Department) and two 
courses with laboratories in either Biology (BI 
110-112, BI 200-202, BI 130-132), Chemistry 
(CH 13 1-1 32, CH 109-1 10) or Physics (PHI 83, 
184; with lab 101, 102). 

To majors who wish to focus their Psychol- 
ogy curriculum on one of the following areas, the 
following concentrations are available: 
1 . Psychology/Management — Psychology fac- 
ulty advisor: Dr. Norman Berkowitz. 



90 • College of Arts & Sciences • Psychology 



2. Psychobiology — Psychology advisor: Dr. 
.Michael Numan. 

In addition, students have the opportunity to 
undertake a five-year, joint Psychology/Social 
Work Master's degree program. Psychology fac- 
ulty advisor: Dr. Michael Moore. 

A minor in Cognitive Science is also available. 
See the section on "Minors" in the College of Arts 
and Sciences section at the front of this booklet. 

Interested students may obtain basic informa- 
tional material from the Psychology main office, 
McGuinn 300-301. 

Senior Thesis 

The Department offers majors the opportunity to 
write a thesis during the senior year. In most cases, 
the thesis will involve original, empirical research, 
although theoretical papers will also be permit- 
ted. Students must obtain the consent of a faculty 
member to serve as their thesis advisor. Those 
who are interested in writing a thesis are encour- 
aged to participate in Independent Study with a 
prospective thesis advisor during the junior year, 
to develop a thesis proposal. Seniors who are en- 
gaged in writing a thesis may enroll in PS 500, 
"Senior Thesis," in either or both semesters. Stu- 
dents whose theses are judged to be of exceptional 
merit will have "Senior thesis passed with honors" 
noted on their University transcripts. The Senior 
Thesis does not fulfill the majors' research meth- 
ods practicum requirement, and students who 
plan to write a thesis are advised to complete their 
practicum before their senior year. 

Psychology Course Numbering 

000-009: Courses for non-majors which do not 
satisfy the Social Science Core requirement and 
do not provide credit toward completion of the 
Psychology major. 

010-069: Courses primarily for non-majors 
which satisfy the Social Science Core Require- 
ment but do not provide credit toward comple- 
tion of the Psychology major. 
070-599: Courses primarily for undergraduate 
Psychology majors. These courses do not satisfy 
the Social Science Core requirement for non- 
majors. 

600-699: Courses open to advanced undergradu- 
ates and graduate students. 
700-above: Graduate level courses. 

Regarding the Social Science Core 
Requirement: 

Non-majors may fulfill the Social Science Core 
requirement with any Psychology course with a 
number between 10 and 069. These are the only 
Psychology courses which fulfill the non-major 
Social Science Core requirement. 

Psychology majors fulfill the Social Science 
Core requirement by virtue of their completion 
of the Psychology major. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

PS 005 Application of Learning Theory* (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of Learning to Learn Pro- 
gram 

The course is a practicum designed to provide 
students with strategies to improve their analyti- 
cal thinking and performance in academic course 
work. The course presents methods based on re- 
search in the psychology of learning. Practice in 
thinking skills is supplemented with related theo- 



retical readings. Because of federal funding re- 
strictions, course enrollment is limited to students 
who meet federal guidelines for the program. 

Daniel Bunch 

Dacia Gen tile I la 

Kuni Uchida 

*This course does not satisfy the Social Science 

Core requirement and does not provide credit 

toward completion of the Psychology major. 

Core Courses 

These courses satisfy the Social Science Core re- 
quirement for non-majors. They may also be 
taken by majors but do not satisfy any of the re- 
quirements for the Psychology major. Each 
course is designed to achieve considerable breadth 
of coverage organized under a guiding theme. 

PS 010 Psychology and Social Issues (F, S: 3) 

What contributions have psychologists — as theo- 
rists, researchers, and practitioners — made to the 
advancement of our understanding of real-life 
problems and phenomena? In considering issues 
such as social inequality, religious resurgence, 
family stability, deviance, social conflict, collec- 
tive violence, etc., can we turn to Psychology for 
data and analysis that will be helpful in address- 
ing such problems? AH Banuazizi 

William Ryan 

PS 039 Psychological Perspectives on Social 
Justice (S: 3) 

This course will examine the psychological re- 
search and theory on justice in relation to percep- 
tions of others and prejudice; the development of 
a sense of justice; justice in close relationships; 
aggression and violence; altruism; social persua- 
sion; justice in the environment; justice in the 
criminal system; justice and the psychological 
bases for peace. Can be taken as a Pulse course 
with field work or as an ordinary classroom 
course. Margaret Gorman 

PS 040 The Social Psychology of Religion (F: 3) 

This course will consist of three approaches to the 
social psychological study of religious experience: 
1) cognitive; 2) existential/phenomenological; and 
3) social. Each unit will begin with a discussion 
of a major theoretical construct and some of the 
issues upon which the tradition is founded. Fol- 
lowing this, a survey of some of the important 
research of each tradition will be undertaken. 
Emphasis will be placed on critical examination 
of each approach, with an eye toward seeing pos- 
sible ways of studying religious phenomena within 
the social psychological perspective. 

Timothy Shortell 

PS 044 Psychology of Art and Creativity (S: 3) 

This course examines the psychological processes 
involved in both the creation of art and in our 
response to art. We will investigate how these 
processes operate in the normal adult, how they 
develop in the child, and how they break down 
under conditions of psychosis and brain-damage. 

Ellen Winner 

PS 048 Psychology and Law (F, S: 3) 

The relationship between the scientific study of 
behavior and the institution which formally or- 
ganizes and controls human social relations is 
examined from three perspectives: psychological 
research on legal process, contributions of psy- 
chological knowledge to understanding social 

nrnhlmrn; with whirh fhp law rlf*al<; and lpcral retni- 



lation of the science and profession of psychology. 
Included is a consideration of the similarities and 
differences between the assumptions, functions, 
and methods of these two enterprises. Examples 
of specific topics include: jury decision-making, 
behavior of lawyers, judicial decision-making; 
evidence; legislative and executive behavior; vio- 
lence, aggression and criminality; social change of 
and by the law; mental health law. 

Stephen L. Jones 

PS 050 Idea of Insanity (F, S: 3) 

Ideas about insanity change dramatically over 
time and space — what causes it, what it is like, 
what to do about it. This course examines some 
of those ideas from different perspectives, with 
side trips into such issues as the philosophical 
problem of mind and body, the sociology of de- 
viance, and such controversies as those surround- 
ing the insanity defense and involuntary confine- 
ment. 

Prospective members of the course should 
understand that this is not a watered-down Abnor- 
mal Psychology course; no discussion of psychi- 
atric diagnoses, no talk about psychotherapy, no 
juicy case histories. The course is about ideas, not 
about insanity. William Ryan 

PS 055 Fundamentals of Humanistic Psychology 

(F:3) 

An overview of the philosophical and psychologi- 
cal roots of humanistic psychology together with 
a critical examination of the theories and research 
of its chief representatives: Rollo May, Abraham 
Maslow, David Bakan, Carl Rogers, Robert 
Assagioli, etc. Margaret Gorman 

PS 062 Psychobiology of Mental Disorders (F, S: 3) 

Abnormal behaviors characteristic of mental dis- 
orders are discussed with respect to psychologi- 
cal and biological origins and treatments. A relax- 
ation method is practiced in class. Lecture format. 

Joseph J. Tecce 

Majors' Courses 

The following courses may be taken by both 
majors and non-majors who have fulfilled the 
appropriate prerequisite, however diey do not sat- 
isfy the Social Science Core requirement for non- 
majors. 

Note: Courses are listed within general cat- 
egories, (General, Biopsychology, Cognitive Pro- 
cesses, Developmental Psychology, Personality 
and Clinical Psychology, Social Psychology, and 
Tutorials), and appear numerically within each 
category. 

General 

PS 073 Introductory Psychology I (F, S: 3)* 

This course provides an introduction to experi- 
mental psychology and biopsychology. The fol- 
lowing topics will be presented: scientific meth- 
odology, sensation and perception, physiological 
psychology, behavioral development, learning 
and memory, cognitive psychology, evolution and 
genetics of behavior, animal behavior, motivation 
and emotion. Students are required to fulfill a 
research participation requirement. This course 
does not satisfy the Social Science Core require- 
ment for non-majors. Peter Gray 

Gail Martino 
John B. Mitchell 
Michael Numan 
Kavitha Srinivas 



College of Arts & Sciences • Psychology • 91 



PS 074 Introductory Psychology II (F, S: 3)* 

An introduction to Psychology as a behavioral 
science, both theoretical and applied. Considers 
such topics as child development, personality, 
social psychology, abnormal behavior and men- 
tal health. Students are required to fulfill a re- 
search participation requirement. This course does 
not satisfy the Social Science Core requirement 
for non majors. Donnah Canavan 

Kyra Kulik 

Gilda A. Morelli 

Nadim Rouhana 

*The introductory courses (PS 013 and PS 074) 

may be taken in either order. 

PS 190 Statistics (F, S: 3) 

This course will present an introduction to those 
elementary statistics essential to the conduct of 
scientific research. Topics will include basic prob- 
ability, the normal distribution, standard scores, 
estimation of parameters, hypothesis-testing, t- 
scores, chi-square, analysis of variance, and simple 
correlation and regression. (The section of this 
course offered by Dr. Norman Berkowitz will 
meet for four class hours per week and provide 4 
credits.) Students are required to fulfill a research 
participation requirement. For majors only. 

Nonnan Berkowitz 
Hiram Brownell 

Randolph D. Easton 
Philip Mitchell 

PS 500 Senior Thesis (F, S: 3) 
Prerequisite: Consent of the Department 

For majors who are writing senior theses. May 
be repeated. The Department 

PS 606 Experimental Design and Statistics (F: 3) 

Pre requisite: An undergraduate statistics course 

This course focuses primarily on the design 
of research experiments and the inferential statis- 
tics used to assess their results. Analysis of vari- 
ance techniques will be emphasized which assess 
the main and interactive effects of multiple inde- 
pendent variables on single dependent variables. 

Randolph D. Easton 

PS 608 Multivariate Statistics (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: An introductory course in statistics 
This course provides a conceptual and prac- 
tical introduction to multivariate statistics. Alge- 
braic demonstrations are used to illustrate the 
inner workings of procedures, but otherwise the 
course content is not very mathematical, i.e., there 
are no discussions based on matrix algebra or cal- 
culus. The major focus is on multiple correlation 
and regression. Other procedures, which are cov- 
ered in less detail as time permits, include princi- 
pal components and factor analysis, clustering 
analysis, and multidimensional scaling. Analyses 
performed using statistical packages are discussed 
in detail. Also addressed are general research is- 
sues such as research design, the logic of hypoth- 
esis testing, and the role of statistics in psychol- 
ogy as a discipline. Hiram Brownell 

PS 621 History and Theories of Psychology (F: 3) 

Survey of the philosophical roots and develop- 
ment of psychological thought from the Grecian 
and Medieval periods to the present. Emergence 
of science in the post-Renaissance period and the 
contributions of Descartes, Locke, British Em- 
piricists and Associationists to the evolution of 



psychological theory. Review of major develop- 
ments in nineteenth-century physiology, 
Darwin's evolutionary theory and its conse- 
quences for psychology, and the emergence of 
psychology as an independent discipline in Ger- 
many and the United States. The rise and demise 
of the major systematic positions in psychology — 
Structuralism, Functionalism, Gestalt, Behavior- 
ism and Psychoanalysis. Overview of current 
theoretical developments and controversies in 
psychology. Undergraduates who desire to take 
this course must first obtain the permission of the 
instructor. AH Banuazizi 

Biopsychology 

PS 1 50 Physiological Psychology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073 or BI 1 10-112 or BI 200-202 
This course presents an introduction to the 
physiological basis of behavior. Basic neu- 
roanatomy and neurophysiology will be presented 
first. Using this background, the following top- 
ics will be discussed: (a) neuropharmacology and 
the biological bases of mental illness, (b) neu- 
roanatomy and neurochemistry of reward and 
reinforcement, (c) the physiological bases of thirst 
and body water regulation as an example of inte- 
grated homeostatic mechanisms, (d) neuroendo- 
crinology and behavior, which will include discus- 
sions of the hormonal control of reproductive 
behavior and the biological contribution to behav- 
ioral sex differences, (e) the anatomy and physi- 
ology of learning and memory. Michael Nitman 

PS 250 The Physiological Basis of Memory (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 150 or PS 273; PS 144 is recom- 
mended. 

Memory results from lasting changes in syn- 
aptic connections generated by the pattern of 
neuronal activity at the time that the memory was 
formed. The modifications that accompany 
memory formation may be as subtle as an altered 
ionic conductance or as conspicuous as the for- 
mation of new synapses. This course will present 
a discussion of how memory is encoded, stored 
and retrieved at several levels of biological com- 
plexity: the integrative functions of neural net- 
works or systems, changes at the cellular level, and 
intracellular events that regulate and modify neu- 
ronal activity. Topics given particular emphasis 
include the work of Kandel and Alkon on organ- 
isms with simple nervous systems, electrophysi- 
ological models of memory, and recent neural- 
network models of memory. John B. Mitchell 

PS 262 Psychophysiology of Stress (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073 or PS 062 or BI 1 10-1 12 or 
BI 200-202 or permission of the instructor 

Psychological, social, and biological stressors 
are discussed in the context of how they impair 
behavior and how they can be controlled. A re- 
laxation method is practiced in class. Seminar 
format. Joseph J. Tecce 

PS 270 Evolution of Behavior (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073 or a college course in biology 
This course concerns the biological basis of 
behavior from an evolutionary perspective. It 
concentrates on the study of behavior in non- 
human vertebrates, with some discussion of inver- 
tebrates and humans. Although the course will 
focus on the study of behavior as a biological ad- 
aptation, it also includes a brief consideration of 



the mechanistic control of behavior and the psy- 
chobiology of behavioral development from an 
evolutionary perspective. The course begins with 
a review of the fundamentals of evolutionary 
theory, behavior genetics, and the concept of ani- 
mal species. Subsequent topics that are discussed 
include foraging, territorial, and anti-predator 
behavior, reproductive interactions including 
parental care, communication behavior, mating 
systems, and animal sociality. The course ends 
with a consideration of the use of the evolution- 
ary perspective for an understanding of human 
behavioral variations. The Department 

PS 273 (BI 481) Introduction to Neurosciences 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: One year of an introductory biology 
course, i.e., BI 200-202 (One year of general 
chemistry, i.e., CH 109-1 10, is also strongly rec- 
ommended.) 

This course is intended to provide a compre- 
hensive introduction to the structure and function 
of the nervous system. We will adopt a multi-level 
approach and consider neural functioning at 
molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Topics 
covered will include the physiology of the neu- 
ron; the pharmacological and molecular bases of 
neurotransmission; the fundamentals of nervous 
system organization; and the neural basis of 
higher order processes such as sensory integration 
and perception, and memory and cognition. 

Grant Balke?tia 

William Brunken 

Michael Numan 

PS 650 Advanced Psychological Psychology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 150 or its equivalent, or PS 273/ 
BI 481, or consent of instructor 

The first half of this course will be taught in a 
lecture format, and the second half will be orga- 
nized as a seminar. The lectures will focus on the 
neuroscience of reproduction and advanced read- 
ings will be assigned. Topics will include the neu- 
ral and endocrine bases of seasonal breeding, male 
and female sexual behavior, parental behavior, and 
sexual differentiation. For the second half of the 
course, each student will present one or two lec- 
tures to the class on a topic of his or her choice 
within the general area of behavioral neuro- 
science. These oral presentations will be based on 
independent library research. Michael Numan 

PS 662 Health Psychology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073, PS 062, BI 1 10-112, BI 200- 
202, or permission of the instructor 

The role of psychological and biological fac- 
tors in the cause, treatment, and prevention of 
biomedical disorders is discussed in the context 
of clinical and basic research. A relaxation method 
is practiced in class. Seminar format. 

Joseph J. Tecce 

Cognitive Processes 

PS 143 Perception (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073; Recommended: PS 140 

The goal of this course is to account for the 
nature of our conscious, perceptual experience of 
the environment. Two major approaches to per- 
ceptual theory — Helmholtzian constructive infer- 
ence vs. Gibsonian direct detection — will be com- 
pared and contrasted by considering major per- 
ceptual phenomena. Discussion topics will em- 



92 • College of Arts & Sciences • Psychology 



phasize visual perception and will include percep- 
tual constancy, perceptual ambiguity, perceptual 
illusion, intersensory integration, and the distinc- 
tion between perception and mental imagery. In 
addition, a developmental approach to under- 
standing perception will be stressed in later stages 
of the course. Randolph D. Easton 

PS 144 Learning (F: 3) 
Prerequisite: PS 073 

The question addressed by this course is how 
experience with biologically significant stimuli in- 
fluences the way in which an organism interacts 
with the environment. .Although the emphasis will 
be on Pavlovian conditioning and instrumental 
learning in non-human vertebrates, the course 
will take a broadly evolutionary approach begin- 
ning with the simplest forms of learning among 
invertebrates and concluding with the implica- 
tions of learning theory for human behavior and 
behavior change. The importance of an 
organism's ecological niche, and the evolutionary 
predispositions and constraints on learning will be 
emphasized. John B. Mitchell 

PS 147 Cognitive Psychology (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073 

An information processing approach to per- 
ception and thought will be covered. It will be 
assumed that information from the environment 
is processed and transformed by the mind in or- 
der to control complex human behavior. Topics 
to be discussed will include perception contrasted 
with receptor stimulation, encoding processes, 
attention, memory, problem solving, concept for- 
mation, altered states of consciousness, and the 
functionally split brain of man. Jeanne Sholl 

Kavitha Srinivas 

PS 1 83 The Future of Consciousness (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 074 

An examination of the nature of consciousness 
from both eastern and western traditions. Selected 
topics include: the evolution of consciousness, 
body consciousness, meditation, telepathy, 
psychokinesis, clairvoyance, survival phenomena, 
magic, and ways of psychospiritual growth. 

Daniel Baer 

PS 184 Techniques of Behavior Control (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 074 

An applied oriented course with emphasis on 
psychological principles that significantly influ- 
ence behavior. Topics include: conditioning and 
habit control, brainwashing, religious conversion, 
cults, hypnosis, healing and biofeedback. 

Daniel Baer 

PS 1 87 Neuropsychology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073 

This course provides an overview of the field 
of neuropsychology, which is the study of how dif- 
ferent parts of the brain work together to produce 
human cognition. A large part of the course ex- 
amines how the effects of brain injury can be used 
to study a range of topics in language, perception, 
memory, thinking, and emotion. Often, injuries 
to different regions of the brain are associated 
with selective deficits. For example, injury to one- 
part of the left hemisphere can disrupt a person's 
ability to produce and understand complete sen- 
tences while leaving relatively intact the ability to 
use single words. This kind of restricted impair- 



ment highlights the different components that 
together make up human language ability. Thus, 
selective deficits can be used to evaluate theories 
of both normal and disrupted cognition. Specific 
topics covered in this course include etiologies of 
brain injury, neuropsychological assessment, 
word, sentence and discourse processing, speech 
prosody, visual perception, mental imagery, and 
emotion. There is some discussion of research 
with intact (non-brain-injured) humans and re- 
search with other species, but most of the course 
addresses the sequelae of brain injury in humans. 
Many of the readings are drawn from journal ar- 
ticles and other primary sources. Hiram Brownell 

PS 243 Introduction to Blindness and Visual 
Impairment (S: 3) 

This course will give students an overview of the 
causes and consequences of total blindness and 
low vision, both congenital and acquired. Impli- 
cations for perception and for psychosocial devel- 
opment and adjustment will be emphasized. The 
service delivery systems for education and reha- 
bilitation will be examined. Simulation of total 
blindness and low vision will be an integral part 
of the course. Billie Louise Bentzen 

PS 263 Topics in the Psychology of 
Consciousness (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 183 

An advanced-level study of states of conscious- 
ness. Topics include: the mind-body problem, 
theories of consciousness, the highest states of 
consciousness, myths, the physics of conscious- 
ness, alternate realities and the nature of personal 
reality. Daniel Baer 

PS 302 Research Methods Practicum: 
Perception (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 143 

Students will be divided into four groups. 
Each group will conduct a complete experiment 
dealing with an important issue in perceptual psy- 
chology. Facets of the experimental process with 
which students will be involved include design, 
construction of apparatus and stimulus materials, 
data collection, data analysis and technical report 
writing. A range of feasible research topics will be 
discussed at the outset of the course and students 
will be allowed to rank-order their first three pref- 
erences. Formation of groups will occur on this 
basis. For majors only. Randolph Easton 

PS 31 1 Research Methods Practicum: Cognitive 
Processes (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 143 or PS 147 

In this course students will acquire "hands-on" 
experience in conducting research designed to 
answer questions such as the following: What 
cognitive factors differentiate people who have a 
poor sense of direction from people who have a 
good sense-of-direction? How do people mentally 
organize their spatial knowledge of the local en- 
vironment? Why are men generally better at vi- 
sual-spatial tasks than women? How can memory 
ability be enhanced? In the course of conducting 
research, students will learn the principles of good 
experimental design. For majors only. Jeanne Sholl 

PS 644 Seminar in Memory (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 147 

This seminar will focus on issues that are im- 
portant to our understanding of episodic and se- 
mantic memory. The issues that will be covered 



will include encoding and retrieval processes in 
memory, the study of interesting lapses of 
memory such as the tip-of-the-tongue phenom- 
enon, the study of how bilinguals and multi- 
linguals represent information in the two lan- 
guages, the failure of memory in brain-damaged 
populations, and the link between memory for 
events and the perception of events. 

Kavitha Srinivas 

Developmental Psychology 

PS 1 36 Developmental Psychology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073 or PS 074 

General psychological issues as they relate to 
the developing child. Topics within the areas of 
personality, social, and cognitive development will 
be considered along with the theoretical and prac- 
tical implications of studying age differences in 
behavior. Michael Moore 

Gilda A. Morelli 

PS 261 (SL 361) Psycholinguists (F: 3) 

This course explores classic issues in the interface 
of language and mind. Topics include language 
acquisition (both by children and by adults); the 
psychological reality of generative grammars; 
versions of the innateness hypothesis; speech pro- 
duction, perception, and processing; and the ques- 
tion of whether animals other than humans com- 
municate through language. Some background in 
linguistics or psychology is desirable. 

Margaret A. Thomas 

PS 305 Research Methods Practicum: 
Developmental/Cognitive (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 136 or PS 147 

Designed to help students achieve an under- 
standing of the logic of psychological research 
through the hands-on experience of designing and 
conducting a psychological experiment and criti- 
cally interpreting the results. The research will 
focus on issues related to the developing child and 
human thinking. Opportunities for developmen- 
tal research will depend, in part, upon the avail- 
ability of subjects. For majors only. Michael Moore 

PS 313 Research Methods Practicum: Language 
and the Arts (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 1 36 or 147 or 25 1 or 258 or con- 
sent of the instructor 

Research will be conducted in two areas: lan- 
guage understanding and sensitivity to the arts 
(the visual arts, music, and literature). Research 
projects can be carried out with children and/or 
with adults. Research topics may include: Can lis- 
teners detect when a melody shifts from major to 
minor? Do children detect unbalanced paintings 
as unbalanced? Can children (or adults) perceive 
moods expressed in paintings? What kinds of cues 
do we use to detect sarcasm and distinguish it 
from a lie? Primary emphasis will be on the ex- 
perimental method. For majors only.Ellen Winner 

PS 645 Cultural Context of Child Development 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: PS 136 

The course examines the developing child 
from a cultural perspective. Topics related to the 
role sociocultural features play in arranging the 
daily lives of children, and how children appro- 
priate the skills and competencies needed to be 
functioning members of their community will be 
examined. The perspective guiding the selection 



College of Arts & Sciences • Psychology 



93 



of reading materials is that knowledge emerges by 
active participation in day-to-day routines of the 
community. Topics for discussion include 
parenting and parental beliefs, gender-role, sib- 
ling and peer relationships, psycholinguistics, 
everyday cognition, and education and the trans- 
mission of knowledge. PS 145 is strongly recom- 
mended. Gilda A. Morelli 

PS 651 Issues in Cognitive Development (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor 

In this seminar we will consider the major theo- 
ries of cognitive development. We will explore 
current work in the area of cognitive develop- 
ment. Topics to be considered include: concept 
formation, word learning, the child's theories of 
mind, and symbolic development. Ellen Winner 

Personality and Clinical Psychology 

PS 101 Personality Theories (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 074 

A basic course introducing students to a variety 
of theoretical approaches to the understanding of 
character and personality. Donnah Canavan 

PS 139 Abnormal Psychology (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisites: PS 073 or PS 074 

Beginning with divergent contemporary views 
of the meaning of abnormal in today's world, this 
course will systematically explore the body of 
theory and data relevant to the understanding of 
maladaptive human process. The varieties of ab- 
normal experience and behavior will be discussed 
and an overview of current approaches to the reso- 
lution of the problem of psychopathology will be 
offered. Ramsay Liem 

Karen Rosen 

PS 209 Clinical Psychology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 139 

Issues associated with the treatment of psy- 
chological disorders will be examined. The con- 
cepts of normality and pathology will be discussed 
in the context of various models of intervention. 
Several different schools of psychotherapy will be 
covered, with an emphasis on the theoretical as- 
sumptions and practical applications of each per- 
spective. Studies on the effectiveness of psycho- 
therapy will be reviewed. The clinical training and 
professional practices of psychologists will be dis- 
cussed. Karen Rosen 

PS 265 Psychological Assessment (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 074; Recommended: PS 101 

The course will emphasize issues and tech- 
niques of personality and clinical assessment. 
Technical and methodological principles of test 
construction (e.g., the evaluation of reliability and 
validity, as well as the establishment of norms and 
the interpretation of test scores) will receive ex- 
tensive treatment. The survey of specific assess- 
ment procedures will range from traditional de- 
vices, including a variety of structured ("objec- 
tive") and unstructured ("projective") techniques, 
to less traditional, but increasingly popular, tech- 
niques of behavioral assessment and sampling. A 
major theme of the course will address the feasi- 
bility and value of devising and applying tech- 
niques of personality assessment derived from the 
experimental laboratory. The Department 

PS 281 Sports Psychology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any Psychology course or consent 
of instructor. Juniors and Seniors, only. 



The course will include 1) the assessment of 
individual and team psychological factors that 
interfere with peak performance, 2) various ap- 
proaches to enhance athletic performance, 3) the 
effects of family and peer pressure, 4) coping with 
poor performance and injury, 5) anecdotal and 
experimental evidence, 6) guest speakers such as 
athletes and coaches. Harvey Dulberg 

PS 303 Research Methods Practicum: Personality 
Theories (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 101 

A course in research methods stressing the 
application of these methods to questions in the 
area of personality psychology. Traits or person- 
ality variables like self-esteem are common top- 
ics. Students, in small groups, actually design, 
conduct, and report their research. For majors only. 

Donnah Canavan 

PS 615 Advanced Seminar: Social and 
Emotional (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Developmental Psychology 

In this seminar, we will explore qualitative 
changes that occur in social and emotional func- 
tioning from birth through adolescence. We will 
examine normative trends and individual differ- 
ences in the development of attachment relation- 
ships, peer relations, self-control, aggression, sex- 
typed behaviors, empathy and prosocial behavior, 
and morality. Contemporary issues such as the 
effects of day care, dual-career couples, divorce 
and single parenthood will be discussed. We will 
consider the social context within which children 
live and grow and explore the role of mothers and 
fathers, siblings, peers, and schools in the devel- 
opmental process. Karen Rosen 

PS 639 Seminar in Developmental 
Psychopathology (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Developmental Psychology and 
Abnormal Psychology 

Developmental psychopathologists view psy- 
chological disturbances in terms of deviations 
from normal patterns of social, emotional, and 
cognitive development. An exploration of the 
origins, nature and course of psychological dis- 
orders at various ages will be made. Theoretical, 
empirical, and clinical issues in the area of devel- 
opmental psychology will be discussed. An under- 
lying theme that we will develop is that there is a 
reciprocal relationship between normal and atypi- 
cal patterns of development. Our understanding 
of pathology can be informed by knowledge of 
what is "normal"; alternatively, we can gain 
greater insight into normal processes of develop- 
ment and the roots of competence, adaptation, 
and invulnerability by illuminating the causes and 
developmental consequences of psychopathology. 

Karen Rosen 

Social Psychology 

PS 1 25 (EN 1 25) (SC 225) Introduction to 
Feminism (F, S: 3) 

A course taught by student teams under faculty 
direction to acquaint students with a large range 
of academic and life experience topics which have 
been affected by the Women's Studies scholar- 
ship. After a preliminary meeting the class divides 
into 12-14 person seminars which meet once a 
week to discuss and study such issues as women's 
history, feminist theory, sex roles and socializa- 



tion, gender and health, religion, work, literature 
and essays by and about women. The course em- 
phasizes participation and collective work on 
projects. Lorraine Liscio 

PS 131 Social Psychology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 074 

A review of the research literature on how 
people act and react to other people and how they 
think about and respond to their social experience. 
Included are such topics as social interaction and 
influences, attitudes and attributions, aggression 
and altruism, cooperation and conflict. Empha- 
sis is placed on both theoretical and applied issues. 

Marianne LaFrance 

PS 145 Cross-Cultural Psychology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 074 

A comparative analysis of psychological pro- 
cesses, personality development and social rela- 
tions across different cultures. Emphasis is placed 
on both theoretical and methodological problems 
in cross-cultural research. Topics include: percep- 
tion, cognition, motivation, socialization, psycho- 
pathology, sex roles, social norms, and collective 
and intergroup behavior. Ali Banuazizi 

PS 146 Political Psychology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychol- 
ogy 

This course considers psychological contribu- 
tions to the study of individual and collective po- 
litical behavior. Major topics include the impact 
of personality on politics; patterns of leadership; 
political socialization, cognitive dynamics and 
political perceptions, images of the enemy; politi- 
cal belief systems, contemporary perspectives on 
dogmatism, authoritarianism, and liberal-conser- 
vatism; and patterns of political violence. Various 
levels of psychological analysis are examined to 
assess the extent and limits of psychology's con- 
tribution to the study of political behavior. 

Nadim Rouhana 

PS 148 Attitudes and Social Relations: Stability 
and Change (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychol- 
ogy 

A review of classic and contemporary ap- 
proaches to attitudes and persuasion: condition- 
ing and modeling; message learning; cognitive 
and motivational approaches; and theory of rea- 
soned action. Attitude measurement and predic- 
tion. Relationship between attitude and action. 
Social attitudes and social influence as central 
analytic tools in understanding stability and 
change in people's relationship to social systems 
and political environments. Conformity to group 
standards; obedience to authority; perceived le- 
gitimacy of social systems. Influence processes in 
persuasive communication and brainwashing. 

Nadim Rouhana 

PS 210 Interpersonal Relations (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 074 

The goal of this course is to provide under- 
standing of interpersonal and group processes 
through examination of the students' own expe- 
riences in a laboratory group which meets weekly 
throughout the semester. In addition, each stu- 
dent will join a committee which will make three 
reports on aspects of group structure and process 
as these are evidenced in the laboratory group. 



94 • College of Arts & Sciences • Psychology 



The reports will combine theory, observations, 
the presenters' own laboratory group experiences, 
and anv additional data they choose to collect. 
Topics may include problems in group formation, 
group goals, status and influence, leadership, 
sociometric structure, norms, conflict, subgroups, 
communication, feedback and attributional per- 
spectives, etc. Grades will be based on these re- 
ports and participation in the discussions of re- 
lated material. Norman Berkowitz 

PS 225 Psychology of Women (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: PS 074, SC 001 or EN 125 

Course is concerned with examining 
psychology's past and current approach to under- 
standing the behavior of girls and women. Top- 
ics include the development of sex-role identity, 
sex differences in cognitive, emotional, and social 
functioning, as well as exploration of various life 
experiences unique to women. Throughout, par- 
ticular attention will be directed toward the im- 
pact of stereotyping and sexism. 

Marianne LaFrance 

PS 245 Emotions, Culture, and Human Diversity 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: PS 074 

This course will explore the following six 
major themes: 1) the evolutionary adaptive func- 
tions of emotions, the neural structures involved 
in the relationships between perception-emotion 
and cognition-emotion; 2) non-verbal: facial, vo- 
cal, postural and gestural communications of 
emotions; 3) emotional development: the role of 
attachment in emotional development, the medi- 
ating function of language in emotional develop- 
ment, and the relationship between emotions and 
moral development; 4) the theories of emotions: 
biological and socio-cultural explanations of emo- 
tions; 5) culture and emotions: relationship be- 
tween language and emotions, rituals and emo- 
tions, and music and emotions; 6) social structure 
and emotions: the effect of social changes (i.e., 
work and family) on people's emotional lives, and 
their attitudes about emotions./CzfOK* G. Behzadi 

PS 249 The Psychology of Nonverbal 
Communication (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073 or PS 074; Recommended: PS 
131 

This course provides an overview of research 
in nonverbal communication, taught from a so- 
cial psychological perspective. The different 
channels of communication (facial expression, 
gaze, posture, touch) will be reviewed, with par- 
ticular emphasis on nonverbal communication in 
the context of intimate relations, power relations, 
and deception situations. The course will focus 
not only on the specific findings, but also on the 
link to other theories and applications within psy- 
chology. Marvin A. Hecht 

PS 256 Theory and Application in Group 
Dynamics (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 074 or consent of instructor 

The relationship between theory and experi- 
ence is emphasized in this course. Aspects of 
group structure and process will be identified 
through structured class exercises and observa- 
tions of groups in natural settings. Con- 
ceptualization of structure and process will be 
accomplished through lecture, readings and dis- 
cussion. Attention will be given to implications for 



improving member and group effectiveness in 
task accomplishment. Content will include com- 
parisons of individual and group performance, 
group goals, decision making, norms, conformity, 
conflict, communication, cohesiveness, and lead- 
ership. Norman Berkowitz 

PS 267 Adult Psychosocial Development (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 073 and PS 074 

This course reviews the changes in life situa- 
tion, in role patterns, in stresses, and in psycho- 
logical functioning that are characteristic for the 
different developmental phases among men and 
women in the contemporary United States. Par- 
ticular attention will be devoted to the stability 
and persistence of behavior and attitude across 
different phases of the life cycle and the sequences 
of work and career, marriage and parenthood, 
child-rearing and community experiences, and 
friendship and leisure opportunities in modifying 
behavior over time. Marc A. Fried 

PS 279 Advanced Psychopathology: 
Sociocultural Perspectives (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 139 or consent of instructor 

This course explores important social and 
cultural perspectives on the definition, cause, and 
treatment of psychological impairment. Ap- 
proaches emphasizing both the more immediate, 
micro contexts of psychological disorder such as 
the family and those concerned with broader so- 
cioeconomic conditions (e.g.-, social class or the 
state of the economy) will be addressed. An effort 
will be made to compare not only the level of so- 
cial process emphasized in each of these perspec- 
tives but also differences in the basic dynamics 
they focus upon, e.g., stress, attributions and la- 
beling, institutional dynamics. Special topics such 
as the mental health of women and minorities, 
crosscultural perspectives on mental illness, and 
human rights and mental the basic dynamics they 
focus upon, e.g., stress, attributions and labeling, 
institutional dynamics. Special topics such as the 
mental health of women and minorities, 
crosscultural perspectives on mental illness, and 
human rights and mental health will be covered, 
based on the interest of students. Ramsay Liem 

PS 306 Research Methods Practicum: Social 
Psychology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PS 13 1 or PS 249 

This practicum is designed to introduce stu- 
dents to research methods used by social psy- 
chologists to study topics such as social interac- 
tion and person perception. The course has two 
primary foci: how to critically read existing re- 
search and how to carry out a research project. 
Primary emphasis will be on the experimental 
method although other methods such as natural- 
istic observation and field studies will be de- 
scribed. For majors only. Marianne LaFrance 

PS 310 Research Methods Practicum: Group 
Dynamics (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: PS 131 or PS 256 

This course is devoted to familiarizing stu- 
dents with all phases of the research process from 
formation of the problem through preparation of 
a research report. Although readings will be as- 
signed, the primary vehicle for learning is the 
study that each student will conduct as a member 
of a research team. The investigation will be di- 
rected to some aspect of small group behavior of 



interest to both students and professor. Studies 
will ordinarily be experimental but other models 
may be employed if better suited to the problem. 
Grades will be based on a final research report 
submitted by each student. Performance in con- 
ducting the research and students' contribution 
to all other phases of the process will also be con- 
sidered. For majors only. Nont/an Berkowitz 

PS 600 (SC 378) (SW 600) Introduction to 
Social Work (F, S: 3) 

The purpose of this course is to give students an 
overview of the field of social work. Starting with 
a discussion of the history of social work and the 
relevance of values and ethics to the practice of 
social work, the course then takes up the various 
social work methods of dealing with individuals, 
groups and communities and their problems. The 
course also examines the current policies and pro- 
grams, issues and trends of the major settings in 
which social work is practiced. 

Regina O'Grady-LeShane 

PS 612 Social Cognition (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

This course will focus on recent advances in 
the area of social cognition with special consid- 
eration of such topics as attribution theory, per- 
ceived control, social schemata, and ordinary ex- 
planations of social behavior. The course will 
provide a critical overview of the theories and 
methods in social cognition as well as application 
to such areas as victimization, prejudice, and cop- 
ing. Marianne LaFrance 

PS 656 Social Psychology of Conflict (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: For graduate students: none; for un- 
dergraduates: consent of the instructor 

Social psychological theories of the origins, 
development, intensification, and resolution of 
conflict at the personal, interpersonal, and inter- 
group levels will be examined. Concepts of social 
identity, life space, group membership potency, 
group boundaries, attribution, and cognitive 
schema will be employed extensively in these 
analyses. Potential effects of conflict at one level 
on the manifestation of conflict at other levels will 
be explored. Application to current interpersonal, 
organizational, and societal conflicts will be en- 
couraged. The course will employ both lectures 
by the instructor and student presentations to the 
class on selected topics. Norman Berkowitz 

PS 676 Self, Ethnic Identity, and Asian 
American History (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

This course is designed to explore Asian 
American history from the perspective of identity 
formation among Asian Americans. Asian tradi- 
tions and culture along with the historical expe- 
riences of Asians in America will be examined in 
conjunction with the psychological literatures on 
self and ethnic identity. As a second historical 
source, students will conduct oral histories with 
family members, ideally intergenerationally. Par- 
ticipants will also have an opportunity to learn first 
hand about contemporary issues facing Asian 
American communities in the Boston area. The 
course will be conducted in a seminar format in 
which students play an active role in facilitating 
discussion. In addition to a term paper, students 
will be invited to design a class project reflecting 



College of Arts & Sciences • Romance Languages ind Literatures • 95 



their collective understanding of self, ethnicity, 
and history. Enrollment will be limited to 15. 

Ramsay Liem 

PS 721 (SW 721) Human Behavior and the 
Social Environment (F: 3) 

This Graduate School of Social Work course does 
not satisfy the Social Science Core requirement 
but may be taken toward completion of the Psy- 
chology major by consent of the instructor, only. 
A foundation course in which the unifying 
theme is the concept of self as a complex of bio- 
psycho-social forces which become synthesized 
through the integrative functions of the human 
ego. The person is viewed as a social being who 
is interacting with an inter-personal and institu- 
tional environment which not only has an impact 
on, but which is also affected by, the individual. 
The course is taught from a social work frame of 
reference within which the concept of self is ex- 
amined in relation to the life cycle, to ethnic and 
sexual aspects of identity and self-esteem as these 
are manifested in social roles, and to those extra- 
familial systems which may constrain or support 
the psychosocial development of the individual. 
The course is structured in modules characterized 
by a highly individualized method of learning in 
which students may move at their own pace in 
mastering required content. Ann Daniels 

The Department 

Two Summer Human Interaction Institutes: 

PS 824 Resolving Conflict: Interpersonal and 
Intergroup 

Advanced Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor 

This workshop offers theory and practice in 
dealing with the conflicts that arise in social in- 
teraction between individuals or groups. Topics 
include the processes leading to constructive ver- 
sus destructive conflicts, the role of attributions 
in generating relational conflicts, methods for 
preventing or de-escalating interpersonal and 
intergroup conflict, including third-party inter- 
ventions. This experience-based workshop com- 
bines lectures and exercises in a design that en- 
ables participants to make individualized applica- 
tions in areas of interest to them. 

Workshop conducted on two consecutive 
weekends, May 29-31 and June 5-7. For further 
information, contact the Boston College Summer 
Session, 314 Fulton Hall. Norman Berkowitz 

PS 825 The Social Self: Group Influences on 
Personal Identity 

Advanced Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor 

The subject of this workshop is how member- 
ship in the distinctive societal groupings — defined 
by ethnicity, race, sex, age, religion, social class, 
ideology — affects the way individuals perceive 
themselves and deal with others. The workshop 
looks at intergroup relations and the psychology 
of the social self to aid in understanding personal 
identities in a heterogeneous society. Participants 
examine their own life histories, socio-identities, 
and social relationships in a guided process of self 
inquiry. Workshop conducted on two consecutive 
weekends, June 12-14 and June 26-28. For fur- 
ther information, contact the Boston College 
Summer Session, 314 Fulton Hall. 

Donnah Canavan 



Tutorials 

PS 292 Seminar in the Teaching of Psychology/ 
Fall (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Designed to provide undergraduate students 
with teaching experience. Students staff discus- 
sion sections and are responsible for aiding psy- 
chology professors in planning demonstrations 
and grading examinations. By arrangement 

The Department 

PS 293 Seminar in the Teaching of Psychology/ 
Spring (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Designed to provide undergraduate students 
with teaching experience. Students staff discus- 
sion sections and are responsible for aiding psy- 
chology professors in planning demonstrations 
and grading examinations. By arrangement 

The Department 

PS 295 Supervised Fieldwork/Fall (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

This three-credit course will be a combination 
of internship and independent study. In some 
cases, students will be allowed to extend it for 
another semester (3 credits). Depending on his/ 
her interests, each student will be assigned to an 
internship in a clinical, educational, industrial or 
administrative establishment, for one or two ses- 
sions a week, arranged in an initial interview with 
the professor and the institution of field place- 
ment. Every student will meet with his/her pro- 
fessor once every three weeks and all students 
enrolled in the course will meet together once 
every month for a class discussion. At the end of 
the semester, each student will be required to 
write a report/essay, eight to twelve typed pages, 
describing the internship undertaken (organiza- 
tion, type of work, population) and evaluating the 
personal experience. 

May not be taken by students who have taken 
PS 297.20 or PS 298.20. Boleslaw A. Wysocki 

PS 296 Supervised Fieldwork/Spring (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

This three-credit course will be a combination 
of internship and independent study. In some 
cases, students will be allowed to extend it for 
another semester (3 credits). Depending on his/ 
her interests, each student will be assigned to an 
internship in a clinical, educational, industrial or 
administrative establishment, for one or two ses- 
sions a week, arranged in an initial interview with 
the professor and the institution of field place- 



ment. Every student will meet with his/her pro- 
fessor once every three weeks and all students 
enrolled in the course will meet together once 
every month for a class discussion. At the end of 
the semester, each student will be required to 
write a report/essay, eight to twelve typed pages, 
describing the internship undertaken (organiza- 
tion, type of work, population) and evaluating the 
personal experience. 

May not be taken by students who have taken 
PS 297.20 or PS 298.20. Boleslaw A. Wysocki 

PS 297 Undergraduate Independent Study/Fall 
(F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

PS 297 and 298 offer a student the opportu- 
nity to study independently a topic of personal 
interest under the supervision of a faculty mem- 
ber of his/her choice within the Department. The 
student and instructor will decide jointly on the 
nature of the readings and related activities in- 
volved as well as the precise form of the scholarly 
work. The Department 

PS 298 Undergraduate Independent Study/ 
Spring (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

PS 297 and 298 offer a student the opportu- 
nity to study independently a topic of personal 
interest under the supervision of a faculty mem- 
ber of his/her choice within the Department. The 
student and instructor will decide jointly on the 
nature of the readings and related activities in- 
volved as well as the precise form of the scholarly 
work. The Department 

The following courses are offered by the De- 
partment on a periodic basis: 
PS 609 Clinical Psychology 
PS 61 1 Seminar: Spatial Cognition 
PS 622 Democratic Values in Education and 
Child-Raising 

PS 632 Seminar: Piaget and Cognitive 

Development 

PS 633 Dynamics of Stress and Adaptation 

PS 637 Child Development 

PS 643 Seminar in Perception 

PS 648 Cognitive Neuropsychology 

PS 669 Childrearing and Education: A 

Psychobiological Perspective 

PS 671 Psychobiology of Reproduction 

PS 677 Psychology and Social Change 



Romance Languages 
and Literatures 



FACULTY 

Joseph D. Gauthier, S.J., Professor Emeritus; 
B.S., Trinity College; A.M., Boston College; 
S.T.L., Weston College; D.esL., Laval 
Univerity 

Guillermo L. Guitarte, Professor Emeritus; 
Profesorado, Filosofia y Letras, Buenos Aires 

Vera Lee, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Russell Sage 



College; A.M., Yale University; Ph.D., Boston 
University 

Marie L. Simonelli, Professor Emeritus; Dotre 
in Lettere e Filosofia, University of Florence; 
Libera Docenza in Filologia Romanza, Rome 

Joseph Figurito, Associate Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., Boston College; A.M., D.M.L., 
Middlebury College 



96 • College of Arts & Sciences • Romance Languages and Literatures 



J. Enrique Ojeda, Professor; Licenciado, 
Universidad Catolica Del Ecuador; A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Rebecca M. Valette, Professor; A.B., Mount 
Holyoke College; Ph.D., University of Colo- 
rado 

Norman Araujo, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard LIniversity 

Matilda T. Bruckner, Associate Professor, 
Chairperson of the Department; A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College; M.P., Ph.D., Yale University 

Dwayne E. Carpenter, Associate Professo?-; B.A., 
M.A., Pacific Union College; Ph.D., University 
of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union at Berkeley 

Jeff Flagg, Adjunct Associate Professor; B.A., 
University of Massachusetts; M.A., Brown Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Boston University 

Rena A. Lamparska, Associate Professor; LLM, 
University of Wroclav; M.A., Catholic Univer- 
sity of America; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Betty Rahv, Associate Professor; A.B., Sweet 
Briar College; A.M., Middlebury College; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

Elizabeth Rhodes, Associate Professor; B.A., 
University of Richmond; M.A., Ph.D., Bryn 
Mawr College 

Harry L. Rosser, Associate Professor; B.A., Col- 
lege of Wooster; M.A., Cornell University; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill 

Laurie Shepard, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Mary Ellen Kiddle, Adjunct Assistant Professor; 
B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.A., 
Middlebury College; M.A., University of Cali- 
fornia; Ph.D., Brown University 

Stephen C. Bold, Instructor; B.A., University 
of Richmond; M.A., Ph.D. (cand.), New York 
University 

Ourida Mostefai, Instructor; Licence de 
Lettres, Universite de la Sorbonne, Nouvelle, 
Paris; M.A., Ph.D. (cand.), New York Univer- 
sity 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

I he Department of Romance Languages and 
Literatures offers courses in French, Italian and 
Spanish. Students majoring in the discipline may 
concentrate in any of the above languages, litera- 
tures, and cultures. Students must have the 
courses taken for their major approved by their 
advisors in the Department. Thirty credits must 
be completed by majors within the following cur- 
riculum of courses: 

1. Advanced Composition and Introduction to 
Literary Analysis (6) 

2. Survey of Literature (6) 

3. Four advanced courses in literature/culture 
of the major field (French, Italian, Spanish) be- 
yond Survey (400 level and up) (12) 



4. Two electives to be chosen from the follow- 



ing: 



a) Phonetics 

b) Additional advanced courses (400 level and 
up) 

c) Immersion courses 

d) Departmental courses in conversation 

e) Departmental courses in culture 

All advanced literature and culture courses are 
open to undergraduate and graduate students, 
with the following distinctions generally applied: 
400, 500 and 600 level courses are primarily di- 
rected to undergraduates, but may also be taken 
for graduate credit; 700 and 900 level courses are 
primarily designed for graduate students, but ad- 
mit especially well-qualified undergraduates. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

It is recommended particularly to majors who 
intend to go on to graduate work, that they ini- 
tiate the study of a second foreign language in 
their sophomore year. For this purpose, courses 
may be taken in any of the languages listed above. 

The major curriculum in Romance Languages 
is designed to give students an active command 
of one foreign language, a broad insight into the 
literature and culture of other nations, and a solid 
preparation for graduate studies in the field. 

Although many language majors begin their 
sequence by taking Survey of Literature in their 
freshman year, it is possible to major in Romance 
Languages with only two years of high school 
preparation. (Students who begin the study of the 
major language in college should plan to take an 
intermediate course during the summer follow- 
ing their freshman year.) 

Students who plan to major in Romance Lan- 
guages should consult the Assistant Chairperson 
of the Department with respect to their qualifi- 
cations and the organization of a program to suit 
their individual needs and objectives. 

Honors Program 

Qualified students wishing to enter The Honors 
Program should secure the Department's permis- 
sion to do so at the end of the sophomore year 
and no later than the end of the first semester of 
the junior year. In addition to the usual require- 
ments for a major, honors students will take a 
three-credit seminar in the spring semester of 
their junior year or the fall semester of their se- 
nior year (Honors Seminar). Qualified students 
who plan to study abroad may enroll in The Jun- 
ior Seminar in the second semester of their sopho- 
more year, with departmental approval. In addi- 
tion, during the senior year, the honors student 
takes three credits during one semester in inde- 
pendent study leading to an honors thesis. This 
is done under the guidance of a Departmental 
advisor. The thesis should be submitted no later 
than April 1. 

The Immersion Program in Foreign 
Languages 

Qualified students may choose from a series of 
required or elective courses conducted entirely in 
the French language or the Spanish language. 
The Departments of History, and Political Sci- 
ence offer in the foreign language courses taught 
by native or bilingual speakers. Coordinating 
courses in the Department of Romance Lan- 
guages are offered. 



For course descriptions of Romance Lan- 
guage offerings, see the course listing below. For 
other sources, check under the department in 
question. 

French 

HS 087-088 Europe 1 500-1 789 Radii rioresai 

PO 323 Toqueville on France & America 

Robert Scigliano 
RL 319-320 Le Francais des Affaires I & II 

Nelly Rosenberg 
RL 341 Immersion French Ourida Mostefai 

Spanish 

RL 343 Immersion Spanish Hariy L. Rosser 

Minor in Italian Studies 

The Minor in Italian Studies, an interdisciplinary 
program created by the Department of Fine Arts, 
History, and Romance Languages and Litera- 
tures, invites students to learn about the impor- 
tant role which the people of the Italian penin- 
sula have played in the development of Western 
civilization. Courses cover Italy's social, economic 
and political history from the eleventh century to 
the present; a broad range of studies on the de- 
velopments in painting, sculpture and architecture 
from Early Medieval times to the present, Italian 
Film, and a study of the great works of Italian lit- 
erature. 

Refer to the "Minors" section under the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences section at the beginning 
of this Catalog for course requirements of the 
Italian Studies minor. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
Offerings in French, 1992-93 

RL 009-010 Elementary French I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

An introduction to the study of French. This 
course begins with development of fundamental 
skills: reading ability, aural comprehension and 
controlled oral expression. Class instruction is 
supplemented by required laboratory work. 

The Department 

RL 042 Intensive Elementary French for 
Proficiency (S: 6) 

The aim of this 6-credit course is to provide mo- 
tivated students an opportunity to study French 
language and culture in an intensive oral environ- 
ment. The course's video-based materials are 
particularly suitable for individuals wishing to put 
the language to immediate use. Successful 
completion of this course (RL 042) and its sequel 
(RL 082-Intensive Intermediate French for Oral 
Proficiency) will enable students to satisfy the lan- 
guage proficiency requirement in two rather than 
four semesters. However, those students who 
prefer will have the option of enrolling directly 
in the regular 2-semester intermediate sequence 
(RL 051-052) after successfully completing RL 
042. This course is conducted in French and will 
meet 4 days per week (75 minutes each class) to 
provide a "planned immersion" in French lan- 
guage and culture. Cynthia Nicholson Bravo 

Margaret Flagg 

RL 051-052 Intermediate French I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL 009-010 or its equivalent. 

The prime objective of this course is to con- 
solidate previous language study into a functional 
body of knowledge. A review of the elements of 



College of Arts & Sciences • Romance Languages and Literatures • 97 



French will be supplemented with the reading of 
selected texts, oral practice and required labora- 
tory work. The Department 

RL 082 Intensive Intermediate French Oral 
Proficiency (F: 6) 

Prerequisite: RL 010, RL 042, or equivalent. 

The aim of this 6-credit course is to provide 
motivated students an opportunity to study 
French language and culture in an intensive oral 
environment. The course's video-based materi- 
als are particularly suitable for individuals wish- 
ing to put the language to immediate use. Success- 
ful completion of this course will enable students 
to satisfy the language proficiency requirement. 
The course will meet 4 days per week (75 min- 
utes each class) to provide a "planned immersion" 
in French language and culture. Conducted in 
French. Cynthia Nicholson Bravo 

Margaret Flagg 

RL 1 00 French Competency Workshop: 
Preparation for Foreign Study (F: 3) 

The workshop is designed to help students who 
have completed Intermediate French prepare lin- 
guistically and effectively for study in France. 
Students will investigate the issue of cultural con- 
frontation through a reading and discussion of the 
six short stories in Albert Camus' L'Exil et le 
royaume and through the preparation of an Inter- 
national Interview. Each student will conduct an 
International Interview with a person from a cul- 
tural experience different from the student's, 
present die results of this interview in an oral class 
presentation, and complete a paper based both on 
the interview and on further research on the for- 
eign culture. An individualized approach focused 
on oral and written expression and a process will 
be used to develop further skill in comprehension, 
conversation, and composition. A reference gram- 
mar, dictionary, and presribed review assignments 
will take the place of a traditional review gram- 
mar book. Permission of the instructor required. 

JeffFlagg 

RL 101-102 Composition, Conversation and 
Reading in French I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: three to four years of solid high 
school preparation or two years of college prepa- 
ration. 

This course offers a review of syntax and 
grammar. Selected contemporary masterpieces 
will be used to develop further proficiency in com- 
prehension, conversation and composition. 

The Department 

RL 300 (EC 396) (HS 192) (PO 520) The 
European Experience (Summer: 3) 

Boston College and the Departments of Econom- 
ics, History and Political Science are pleased to 
offer this three-week Summer Program in asso- 
ciation with the Irish Institute for European Af- 
fairs in Louvain (Leuven) Belgium. Professors in 
three departments will teach the course assisted 
by members of the EEC in Brussels and visiting 
faculty from neighboring universities. Students 
will be offered the opportunity to interact with the 
cultural, social and economic philosophies of our 
European neighbors, now forming the European 
Economic Community. Students will travel and 
will be exposed to the cultural history, art, and 
architecture of various regions. Drawing on the 
resources of the University of Louvain and Brus- 



sels and other major European cities, students will 
develop and present materials for the course pa- 
per. Katharine Hastings 

RL 303 French Phonetics and Oral Expression 
(S:3) 

A practical introduction to phonetics and oral 
expression. The course is designed to help the 
student improve command of spoken French and 
to develop awareness of how the French language 
functions. Rebecca Valette 

RL 305-306 Advanced French Composition and 
Introduction to Literary Analysis I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course proposes to deepen the student's 
mastery of the structures of written French as well 
as to introduce the techniques of textual analysis. 
In order to prepare the students for a wide range 
of exercises in written composition, selected top- 
ics of advanced grammar and stylistics (such as 
verbal aspect, point of view, and mise en relief) will 
be examined in context. Special attention will also 
be given to the enrichment of the student's active 
vocabulary. The first semester emphasizes de- 
scriptive written exercises based on a wide vari- 
ety of textual models, as well as analytical read- 
ing skills. The second semester emphasizes nar- 
rative and critical modes of writing based on a 
wide variety of textual models. This is a required 
course for majors. Conducted in French. 

Stephen Bold 
Ourida Mostefai 

RL 307-308 Survey of French Literature I & II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: four years of solid high school prepa- 
ration or RL 305-306. 

An introduction to the study of French litera- 
ture. Selected texts from the Middle Ages to the 
20th century will be analyzed against the back- 
ground of historical events and European literary 
movements. This is a required course for French 
majors, open also to other qualified students with 
superior linguistic preparation. This course is a 
prerequisite for all advanced literature courses. 
Conducted in French. Noniran Araujo 

Matilda T Bruckner 
RL 319 Le Francois des Affaires I: 
Contemporary Civilization of France (F: 3) 
Conversational approach to France in the Euro- 
pean Community. This course will study the po- 
litical, social and economic perspectives of France 
in the European Community and serve as a prepa- 
ration for Le Francais des Affaires IT. Le Francois 
Economique et Commercial. Students will expand 
their vocabulary and knowledge of language 
structure by reading cultural and literary texts 
covering a broad spectrum of viewpoints and in- 
terests: an exploration of France as presented in 
the Dossiers du Monde, in the French press and 
Euroscopie. Oral debates, small group discussions 
and written expression will be stressed. Con- 
ducted in French. Permission of instructor re- 
quired. Nelly Rosenberg 

RL 320 Le Francais des Affaires II: Le Francais 
Economique et Commercial (S: 3) 

Designed for students interested in international 
business or affairs or who intend to work or travel 
for business in French speaking countries. 
Through videotapes, taped interviews and current 
newspaper and magazine articles, students find 
out about practices, customs and "intangibles" 



which make French businesses different from 
their American counterparts. Students study the 
functioning of a French corporation, write busi- 
ness letters and translate documents; they learn 
specialized business and economic vocabulary and 
the principles of business correspondence and 
review the essential grammatical structures of the 
French language. Students enrolled may take the 
Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry exams 
and obtain an official certificate attesting to their 
proficiency in French. This exam is entirely op- 
tional. Conducted in French. Permission of in- 
structor required. Nelly Rosenberg 

RL 340 The Classical Moment: A Cinematic Look 
at French Culture in the Age of Richelieu and 
Louis XIV (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: CCR or 4 years of high school 
French. 

Emerging from the tumult of the guerres de 
religion (1 562-1 598), 1 7th-century France estab- 
lished itself as a political and military power while 
Paris was again becoming a dominant center of 
culture, the envy of all Europe. From the intrigues 
and struggles surrounding Richelieu's dramatic 
restructuring of France's political and social in- 
stitutions, leading eventually to the violent upris- 
ing of the upper classes known as la Fronde, to the 
shining glory of Louis XIV's Versailles, we will 
rediscover this Golden Age of French civilization 
through a wide variety of documents including, 
first and foremost, recent films depicting the pe- 
riod, new and old interpretations of the century's 
greatest theatrical and musical works, the newly 
flourishing visual arts, and a selection of written 
texts ranging from contemporary memoirs to 
modern assessments of "the Splendid Century" as 
one historian has called these fascinating years in 
French history. Conducted in French. 

Stephen Bold 

RL 341 Immersion French (F: 3) 

This course will give students with a solid back- 
ground in French the opportunity to improve 
their knowledge of French language, literature, 
and culture. The course will offer an advanced 
grammar review, exercises in creative writing and 
composition, as well as readings of short stories 
and poems. At the end of the semester, students 
will present to the class a project on an aspect of 
French culture. This course may be taken as an 
elective or as a preparation for the other offerings 
in the Immersion Program in French. Conducted 
in French. Ourida Mostefai 

RL 347 Paris Aujourd'hui: comment s'y prendre 

(F:3) 

An entirely new way to discover Paris, to perfect 
your French and to "interact" with real Parisians 
through an innovative computer-based technol- 
ogy using a "videodisc" which permits each stu- 
dent to become the central figure in his or her 
quest throughout the city for lodging. Each stu- 
dent will learn to understand contemporary 
French culture through verbal, visual and non- 
verbal methodology which includes "immersion" 
and "exploration" techniques. Recommended for 
undergraduates planning to spend their junior 
year in France. Permission of instructor required. 

Betty T. Rahv 
RL 348 Les Francais et I'Amerique (S: 3) 
French perceptions of America will be examined 
in historical and literary texts. Each student will 



98 • College of Arts & Sciences • Romance Languages vnd Literatures 



prepare an oral presentation illustrating a cultural 
encounter between the French and the Americans 
and complete a paper on this topic. The final 
grade will be based on class discussion of the texts 
assigned and constructive group interaction in the 
development of the oral presentations and the 
papers, the oral presentation, the paper, and the 
final examination. J e Jf^ a SS 

RL 359 Advanced French Conversation/French 
Culture in Quebec (F:3) 

Note: This course is not open to students who have taken 
RL 201 or RL 208. 

This course is designed to develop students' con- 
versational skills and speaking proficiency 
through discussion of current events, social and 
cultural developments in Quebec, through analy- 
sis of the works of contemporary writers such as 
Anne Hebert, Gabrielle Roy, Jean-Pierre April 
and Monique Proulx. Oral debates, group discus- 
sions and written expression will be stressed. This 
course offers an introduction to Quebec history, 
political structures and cultural identity through 
the study of newspapers, magazines and videos. 
Permission of instructor required. Conducted in 
French. Nelly Rosenberg 

RL 360 Advanced French Conversation/French 
and North African Culture (S: 3) 
Note: This course is not open to students who have taken 
RL 201 or RL 208. 

This course is designed to improve students' con- 
versational skills through discussion of cultural, 
political and social developments in France and 
North Africa, through analysis of the works of 
contemporary writers such as A. Memmi, A. 
Camus, K. Yacine, Marie Cardinal, Driss Chraib 
and Mouloud Feraoun. Class discussions will be 
based on reading assignments and on the exami- 
nation of sociological trends in France. The ap- 
proach is one of open dialogue between the stu- 
dent and the instructor. Conducted in French. 
Permission of instructor required. 

Nelly Rosenberg 

RL 374-375 Literature and Opera (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will focus on the interrelation of lit- 
erature and music. Masterpieces of English, 
French, Spanish and Italian literature will be ana- 
lyzed before the musical adaptation. All foreign 
literary works will be read in English translation; 
students majoring in Romance Languages are 
required to read the works in the original lan- 
guage. Joseph Figurito 

RL 376 Conversational Approach to 
Contemporary France (S: 3) The Department 

RL 403 Introduction to Linguistics for Students 
of French Literature (S:3) 

This course will be based primarily on an in-depdi 
readingofSaussure'sCoursdelinguistiquegenerale, 
a seminal text not only for the development of 
modern linguistic theory but also for 20th-cen- 
tury critical discourse, especially (but not only) in 
France. The student will acquire a basic knowl- 
edge of the central topics in modern descriptive 
linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax, and 
semantics), especially as applied to the study of the 
French language. In addition we will survey im- 
portant texts of French structuralism (e.g. articles 
by Barthes, Todorov, Levi-Strauss, and Jakobson) 
to see how the idea of language's structure has 
influenced modern theories on the structure of 



discourse in general and, more specifically, theo- 
ries of literary criticism. At the end of the semes- 
ter we will consider briefly some broader ques- 
tions including "what is a grammar?" (Chomsky 
v. the structuralist linguists) and "what does lan- 
guage do?" (as asked by Austin, Benveniste, and 
others). Conducted in French. Stephen C. Bold 

RL 404 Paris: le quartier du Marais (S: 3) 

This course presents a new way to explore the 
cultural aspects of France-past and present-by 
means of an "interactive" documentary on a com- 
munication-based software program which allows 
students to explore the Marais either chronologi- 
cally — in its linear historical development, or topi- 
cally — according to a single theme, such as art and 
architecture; government; politics; daily life; the 
nobility, the people, women and the family; etc. 
The videodisc component of this course will be 
accompanied by texts to be read and individual or 
team projects to be completed during the semes- 
ter. Betty T Rahv 

RL 426 The Smiling Philosophers: Rabelais and 
Montaigne (F: 3) 

The French Renaissance radically "recenters" all 
arts, letters, and science on the human individual 
as the "microcosm" which represents and domi- 
nates the larger "macrocosm" surrounding him. 
In 16th-century France, this humanistic surge 
evolves from its inception in the comic genius of 
Rabelais to its culmination in the philosophical 
smile of Montaigne. Everything is measure "a la 
taille de l'homme" as the individual questions his 
moral and philosophical stance in the universe 
from a wholly new perspective. Taking the texts 
as our point of departure, we will study various 
critical interpretations of both Rabelais and 
Montaigne with some emphasis on Bakhtin's in- 
novative and influential notion of Rabelais' work 
as "carneval," and a close look at the "autobio- 
graphical" preoccupation of contemporary crit- 
ics as necessarily beginning in French literature 
with Montaigne's Essais. Betty T Rahv 

RL 431 Masterpieces of 17th-century French 
Classical Literature (F: 3) 

This course will offer an advanced introduction 
to 1 7th-century French literature through a study 
of major works by leading writers of the period 
including Corneille, Moliere, Racine, Pascal, La 
Rochefoucauld, La Fayette, La Fontaine and 
Boileau. These authors will be studied in the con- 
text of the cultural and political history of the 
period. Conducted in French. Stephen Bold 

RL 443 1 8th-Century French Theater: Staging 
Philosophy (F: 3) 

This course examines the controversy surround- 
ing the question of the theater in 18th-century 
France. We will focus on the role of the stage in 
the 18th century as a major instrument of philo- 
sophical and political propaganda for both the 
Enlightenment and its adversaries. The dramatic 
representation will be studied in the context of the 
reform of the theater. Plays by Lesage, Voltaire, 
Marivaux, Diderot, Sedaine and Beaumarchais 
will be read. Conducted in French. 

Ourida Mostefai 

RL 450 Rousseau: Myth and Interpretation (S: 3) 

In this course we will read closely the major texts 
of Rousseau: The Discours, La Lettre a d'Alembert, 
La Nouvelle Heloise, Du Contrat Social, Emile, Les 



Confessions and Les Reveries. We will study the re- 
ception of Rousseau's writings since the eigh- 
teenth century in order to analyze the myth sur- 
rounding the person and the writer. Modern in- 
terpretations of Rousseau's thought will be exam- 
ined. Conducted in French. Ourida Mostefai 

RL 458 "Contes et Nouvelles" in the Nineteenth 
Century (S: 3) 

While devoting proper attention to the general 
evolution of the conte in the nineteenth century, 
the course will center around the most significant 
works of Merimee, Maupassant, and Daudet. 

Norman Araujo 

RL 477-478 The French Novel in the Twentieth 
Century I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

The twentieth-century confrontation with issues 
of identity, art, death, sexuality, freedom, pathol- 
ogy, meaning, and writing itself will be examined 
through some of the important French and 
Francophone novels of the century. Starting with 
Proust's Combray and ending with Wittig's Les 
Guerilleres, readings will include works by Breton, 
Sarter, Gide, Butor, Sarraute, Hebert, and Ben 
Jelloun. The Department 

RL 483 20th-century Theater: Myth Revisited 

(S:3) 

This course will present modern reinterpretations 
of traditional myths and legends emphasizing how 
universal ethical issues raised in the original texts 
have been reinterpreted and adapted particularly 
to modern moral concerns. How the individual 
faces society, the gods, and oneself are three uni- 
versal themes we will consider, among others, in 
our readings, in our class discussions and in view- 
ing video-taped versions of a number of these 
myths. Conducted in French. Betty T Rahv 

The following graduate courses are available 
to advanced undergraduates with the permission 
of the Department. 

RL 704 Advanced French Stylistics (S: 3) 

A variety of texts such as essays from Barthes' 
Mythologies, excerpts from Madame Bovary, short 
stories by Maupassant and Colette, as well as po- 
etry, magazine and newspaper articles and edito- 
rials will be used for intensive analysis, including 
translation and study of style and genre. These 
different discourses will serve as models for the 
students' own compositional work. 

The Department 

RL 705 History of the French Language (F: 3) 

The seminar will trace the transformation of Late 
Latin into Old French. Texts attesting to inter- 
mediary stages of the process will be studied as an 
introduction to the earliest linguistic and literary 
monuments of ancien francais including the 
Serments de Strasbourg and the Sequence of Saint 
Eulalie. The course will focus on the phonologi- 
cal, morphological, syntactic and lexical features 
of the major Old French literary dialects. Con- 
ducted in French. Laurie Shepard 

RL 71 1 Nobles and Beasts, Saints and 
Tricksters: Generic Exchanges in Medieval 
French Literature (S: 3) 

This course is designed to show how medieval 
storytellers can reuse and combine a common 
fund of materials to reshape the familiar into the 
new and different, transform the serious into the 
burlesque, cross the boundaries of comedy and 



College of Arts & Sciences • Romance Languages \nd Literatures • 99 



tragedy, mix the religious and the profane. Works 
read in Modern French translation (with refer- 
ence to the original language as useful and/or 
desired) include: the Charroi de Nimes, the Vie de 
St. Alexis, the Jeu a" Adam, the Jen de St. Nicolas, 
the Fo/ies Tristan, and the Roman de Renart. 

Matilda Bruckner 

RL 752 Mirror or Mirage in the Realistic Novel? 

(F:3) 

The evolution of the realistic novel in the nine- 
teenth century as it appears in the works of 
Stendhal, Balzac, and Flaubert: Beylisme, 
Bovarysme, and the universe of the Come'die 
humaine. Norman Araujo 

Projected French Offerings, 1 993-94 

RL 100 French Competency Workshop: 
Preparation for Foreign Study (F: 3) Jeff Flagg 

RL 303 French Phonetics (S: 3) Rebecca Valettc 

RL 340 The Classical Moment: A Cinematic Look 
at French Culture in the Age of Richelieu and 
Louis XrV (F: 3) Stephen Bold 

RL 341 Immersion French (F: 3) Ourida Mostefai 

RL 400 Crisis of Conscience in Farly Modern 
France (for undergraduates only) (S: 3) Jeff Flagg & 

Betty T. Rahv 

RL 41 1-412 Masterpieces of Medieval French 
Literature I & II (F: 3-S: 3) Matilda T. Bruckner 

RL 423 Poet's Lyre (F: 3) Betty T. Rahv 

RL 435 Tragic Heroes of 1 7th-century French 
Literature (F: 3) Stephen Bold 

RL 446 Social Mobility in the 1 8th-Century 
French Novel (F: 3) Ourida Mostefai 

RL 448 The French Revolution (S: 3) 

Ourida Mostefai 
RL 451 French Romanticism (S: 3) Norman Araujo 

RL 457 Passion Staged and Upstaged: 19th- 
century French Theater Norman Araujo 

RL 470 Surrealism (F: 3) The Department 

RL 479 20th-century French Poetry (S: 3) 

The Department 

RL 734 Poetic Ideals in the 17th Century (S: 3) 

Stephen Bold 

Projected French Offerings, 1994-95 

RL 100 French Competency Workshop: 
Preparation for Foreign Study (F: 3) Jeff Flagg 

RL 303 French Phonetics (S: 3) Rebecca Valette 

RL 348 Les Francais et l'Amerique (S: 3) Jeff Flagg 

RL 403 Introduction to Linguistics for Students of 
French Literature (F: 3) Stephen Bold 

RL 426 The Smiling Philosophers: Rabelais and 
Montaigne (S: 3) Betty Rahv 

RL 437 The Politics of Passion: 17th-century 
French Moralists (F: 3) Stephen Bold 

RL 441 The Age of Enlightenment: Theory or 
Fiction (F: 3) Ourida Mostefai 

RL 444 Diderot: Philosopher, Novelist & Critic 
(S: 3) Ourida Mostefai 

RL 452 Realism (S: 3) Norman Araujo 

RL 454 Hugo: The Romantic Revolution (F: 3) 

Norman Araujo 
RL 477-478 The French Novel in the 20th 
Century I & II (F: 3-S:3) The Department 

RL 480 Autobiography/Autocriticism (F: 3) 
Betty Rahv 

RL 490 Fictional Heroines/Ravages of Amour 
Passion (S: 3) Matilda Bruckner 

RL 704 Advanced French Stylistics (S: 3) 

The Department 



RL 713 Birth of Medieval Vernacular Lyric: 
Provencal Poetry & the Flowering of Fin'amor 
(F: 3) Matilda Bruckner 

RL 733 17th-century French Comedy and Satire 
(S: 3) Stephen Bold 

Offerings in Italian, 1992-93 

RL 003-004 Elementary Italian I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

An introduction to the study of Italian. This 
course begins with development of fundamental 
skills: reading ability, aural comprehension and 
controlled oral expression. Class instruction is 
supplemented by required laboratory work. 

The Department 

RL 053-054 Intermediate Italian I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL 003-004 or its equivalent. 

The prime object of this course is to consoli- 
date previous language study into a functional 
body of knowledge. A review of the elements of 
Italian will be supplemented with the reading of 
selected texts, oral practice and required labora- 
tory work. The Department 

RL 103-104 Composition, Conversation and 
Reading in Italian I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: three to four years of solid high 
school preparation or two years of college prepa- 
ration. 

This course is structured according to stu- 
dents' individual needs in order to improve their 
proficiency in Italian. Selected contemporary 
masterpieces will be used to develop further skill 
in conversation, reading and writing. 

Cecilia Mattii 

RL 315-316 Advanced Italian Composition and 
Introduction to Literary Analysis I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

The purpose of this course is to strengthen stu- 
dents' writing skills through frequent written as- 
signments and to develop critical appreciation of 
Italian literature through analysis of literary pas- 
sages and of two major works. The content of the 
course focuses on the following: mastery of gram- 
mar through intensive review; development of 
writing skills through exercises, compositions and 
papers; understanding of literature through analy- 
sis of selected works; and appreciation of Italian 
life through discussion of contemporary writings. 
This is a required course for majors. 

Cecilia Mattii 

RL 317-318 Survey of Italian Literature I & II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: four years of solid high school prepa- 
ration or RL 103- 104. 

An introduction to the study of Italian litera- 
ture. Masterpieces from the Middle Ages to the 
20th century will be analyzed against the back- 
ground of historical events and European literary 
movements. This is a required course for Italian 
majors, open also to other qualified students with 
a superior linguistic preparation. The first semes- 
ter introduces Italian literature from its origins in 
the thirteenth century to the Renaissance. The 
course is designed to familiarize students with is- 
sues of literary analysis and writing about litera- 
ture. Conducted in Italian. Rena Lamparska 

Laurie Shepard 

RL 336 Conversational Approach to 
Contemporary Italian Events (S: 3) 

Open to students with an intermediate level of 
oral proficiency in Italian. Goals include the im- 



provement of conversational skills through dis- 
cussion of various cultural and social aspects of 
contemporary Italy, such as youth and the fam- 
ily, moral problems, education, religion, music 
and entertainment, fashion and hobbies. Reading 
will include articles from magazines, related brief 
essays and short stories. A variety of media will 
be studied including Italian television broadcasts 
and films. Guest speakers from the Italian cultural 
organizations in the area will contribute to the 
program. Rena Lamparska 

RL 363 Highlights of Renaissance Italian 
Literature (S: 3) 

The course will survey some of the profoundly 
innovative literary works of the Italian Renais- 
sance. Representative texts will be analyzed from 
several major genres, texts that were admired (or 
reviled) and imitated throughout Europe for cen- 
turies. Readings include Petrarch's Canzoniere, 
Sannazaro'sa pastoral poem Arcadia, Ariosto's 
chivalric epic OrlandojFurioso, Bibbiena's comedy 
Calandria, the Courtier, Castiglione's book ot 
manners, and Machiavelli's political treatise, the 
Prince. Conducted in English. Laurie Shepard 

RL 387 (EN 215) The Contemporary Italian 
Novel (F: 3) 

A study of the Italian masterpieces from I. Svevo 
to U. Eco emphasizing the creation of the 
postmodern sensibility. Conducted in English. 

Rena Lamparska 

RL 521-522 Masterpieces of the Italian 
Renaissance I & II (F:3-S:3) 

The first semester will survey the major intellec- 
tual developments of the fifteenth-century 
Florentine Renaissance. The optimistic and influ- 
ential contributions of the Civic Humanists, Neo- 
Platonists, and the writers of the circle of Lorenzo 
the Magnificent, especially Poliziano, and finally 
the crisis of the last decade of the century and the 
powerful voice of Savonarola will be the focus of 
the discussion. The second semester will survey 
the major literary works and genres of the six- 
teenth-century Renaissance Italy. There will be 
a special emphasis on the poetry written by 
women. We will also discuss Renaissance critical 
theory and the debate over the establishment of 
an "Italian" literary language. Conducted in Ital- 
ian. Laurie Shepard 

RL 553 19th-century Italian Literature 
(Romanticism and Verismo) (F: 3) 
The development of Romanticism and I erismo in 
19th century Italy will be the focus. The course 
will concentrate on reading and commentary of 
the major writings by Ugo Foscolo, Giacomo 
Leopardi, AJessandro Manzoni, Luigi Capuana 
and Giovanni Verga, and examine the literary tra- 
ditions in which they wrote. Conducted in Ital- 
ian. Rena Lamparska 

RL 569 20th-century Italian Novel 
[Decadentismo and Contemporary Novel) (S: 3) 

A general introduction to late 19th and 20th cen- 
tury Italian narrative. Readings include selected 
works by the major authors of the period: G. 
D'Annunzio, I. Svevo, L. Pirandello, A. Moravia, 
E. Vittorini, C. Pavese, V. Pratolini, E. Moraine, 
A. Band, and I. Calvino. The course will empha- 
size the thematic and structural changes of the 
novel as a literary genre within the context of 
general cultural trends. Conducted in Italian. 

Rena Lamparska 



100 • College of Arts& Sciences • Romance Languages and Literatures 



Projected Italian Offerings, 1993-94 

RL 336 Conversational Approach to 
Contemporary Italian Events (S: 3) Rena Lamparska 

RL 387 (EX 215) The Contemporary Italian 
Novel (F: 3) Rena Lamparska 

RL 506 Dante: La Divi/ia Commedia (F: 3) 

Laurie Shepard 
RL 507 Boccaccio and Petrarca (S: 3) 

Laurie Shepard 
RL 544 Italian Comic & Tragic Theater of the 
18th Century (S: 3) Rena Lamparska 

RL 568 Theater of Pirandello (F: 3) 

Rena Lamparska 

Projected Italian Offerings, 1 994-95 

RL 336 Conversational Approach to 
Contemporary Italian Events (S: 3) Rena Lamparska 

RL 521-522 Masterpieces of the Italian 
Renaissance I & II (F:3-S:3) Laurie Shepard 

RL 553 19th-century Italian Literature 
(Romanticism and Verismo) (F: 3) Rena Lamparska 

RL 569 20th-century Italian Novel 
(Decadentismo and Contemporary Novel) (S: 3) 

Rena Lamparska 

Offerings in Spanish, 1992-93 

RL 01 5-01 6 Elementary Spanish I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

An introduction to the study of Spanish. This 
course begins with development of fundamental 
skills: reading proficiency, aural comprehension 
and controlled oral expression. Class instruction 
is supplemented by required laboratory work. 

The Department 

RL 041 Intensive Elementary Spanish for 
Proficiency (Destinos: An Introduction to 
Spanish) (F: 6) 

The aim of this six-credit course is to provide 
motivated students an opportunity to study Span- 
ish language and culture in an intensive oral en- 
vironment. The course's video-based materials 
are particularly suitable for individuals wishing to 
put the language to immediate use. Successful 
completion of this course (RL 041) and its sequel 
(RL 08 1 , Intensive Intermediate Spanish for Pro- 
ficiency) will enable students to satisfy the lan- 
guage proficiency requirement in two rather than 
four semesters. However, those students who 
prefer will have the option of enrolling directly 
in the regular two-semester intermediate se- 
quence (RL 055-056) after successfully complet- 
ing RL 041. This six-credit course will meet 5 
days per week to provide a "planned immersion" 
in Spanish language and culture. The Department 

RL 055-056 Intermediate Spanish I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL 005-006 or its equivalent. 

The prime object of this course is to consoli- 
date previous language study into a functional 
body of knowledge. A review of the elements of 
Spanish will be supplemented with the reading of 
selected texts, oral practice and required labora- 
tory work. The Department 

RL 081 Intensive Intermediate Spanish for 
Proficiency (S: 6) 

Prerequisite: RL 016, RL 041, or equivalent. 

The aim of this 6-credit course is to provide 
motivated students an opportunity to study Span- 
ish language and culture in an intensive oral en- 
vironment. The course's video-based materials 
are particularly suitable for individuals wishing to 
put the language to immediate use. Successful 



completion of this course will enable students to 
satisfy the language proficiency requirement. The 
course will meet 5 days per week to provide a 
"planned immersion" in Spanish language and 
culture. Conducted in Spanish. The Department 

RL 105-106 Spanish Composition, Conversation 
and Readings I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: three to four years of solid high 
school preparation or two years of college prepa- 
ration. 

Students who have successfully completed RL 
056 or its equivalent are encouraged to continue 
to develop their language skills in this course. 
Articles, short stories and plays from the contem- 
porary Spanish-speaking world provide the basis 
for increasing vocabulary, practicing reading 
strategies and facilitating conversation. Tapes and 
videos further develop the discussion topics while 
aiding listening comprehension. Students develop 
writing skills at their own pace by keeping a jour- 
nal. There is a brief but intensive grammar review. 
Conducted in Spanish. Gene Kupferschmid 

RL 107-108 Spanish for Spanish Speakers I 
and II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Do your parents and/or grandparents speak Span- 
ish at home? Do you understand what they are 
saying and respond in Spanish? Do you feel, how- 
ever, that you would like to strengthen your 
knowledge of the structure of this language, in- 
crease your vocabulary, and learn to write well and 
read easily? This course, which will be taught in 
Spanish, has been designed especially to help stu- 
dents who wish to achieve those goals. Permission 
of instructor required. The Department 

RL 321 Spanish for Business (S: 3) 

A one-semester course presenting contemporary 
business practices and activities in Latin America 
and Spain with emphasis on the terminology and 
style of oral and written communication in the 
Hispanic business world. Permission of instruc- 
tor is required. Mary Ellen Kiddle 

RL 323 Spanish Phonetics (S: 3) 

A practical introduction to pronunciation, sen- 
tence structure, and word classes. The course is 
designed to help the student improve command 
of spoken Spanish and to develop awareness of 
how the Spanish language functions. 

Guillermo Guitarte 

RL 325-326 Advanced Spanish Composition 
and Introduction to Literary Analysis I & II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course provides an introduction to, and prac- 
tice with, methods of critical analysis in the con- 
text of Hispanic literature, stressing the develop- 
ment of writing skills and mastery of specific 
points of advanced grammar. This is a course re- 
quired for all Spanish majors. Conducted in Span- 
ish. Dwayne Carpenter 

Elizabeth Rhodes 
Harry L. Rosser 

RL 327-328 Survey of Peninsular Spanish 
Literature I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL 325-326 

An interpretation of the life and culture of 
Spain seen through a study of representative au- 
thors, works, and literary movements from the 
medieval lyric and epic to the end of the Golden 
Age (first semester); and from the end of the 1 7th 



century through the modern period (second se- 
mester). This is a required course for majors. 

The Department 

RL 329-330 Survey of Spanish American 
Literature I & II (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL 325-326 

The course intends to give the student an 
overview of the important literary works written 
by Spanish American authors from the earliest 
colonial years to the present. J. Enrique Ojeda 

RL 337 Cultura Hispanica (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: At least four years of Spanish. 

This course will provide the student with a 
sound knowledge of the history and cultural evo- 
lution of Spain the first semester and Spanish 
America the second semester. J. Enrique Ojeda 

RL 343 Immersion Spanish (F: 3) 

As a coordinating requisite for the Immersion 
Program, this course is designed to provide an 
intensive review of major Spanish constructions 
for developing oral and written proficiency at the 
advanced level, and its cultural dimension helps 
to integrate the other offerings in the Program. 

Hany Rosser 

RL 345 Images of Latin America (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL 106 or 4 years of high school 
Spanish. 

An introduction, mostly through video mate- 
rial, to the geography, history, art and some con- 
temporary political events of Latin America. An 
exploration of the continent and a study of the 
shaping of the Latin American mind. Films, vid- 
eos, slides and taped interviews with noted Latin 
American writers will be used. Special emphasis 
will be given to Mexico, Argentina and the Car- 
ibbean. Conducted in Spanish. Elective for ma- 
jors. Miguel Novak 

Note: Courses numbered between 600-649 are 
reserved for undergraduate students only. 
Courses numbered between 650-697 are open to 
graduate students as well as undergraduate stu- 
dents. 

RL 600 Escribir, Descubrir (F: 3) 

This is a topics class, the subject of which varies 
but the structure of which remains the same. In 
it, undergraduates explore the frontiers of His- 
panic texts by speaking and writing about them. 
Class size is limited. The theme of 1992 is "Lib- 
eration Literature," and will focus on works which 
appear on the threshold of revolution, whether 
that revolution actually took place or not. They 
are texts that stretched the boundaries of knowl- 
edge or thought systems as they existed when the 
text appeared. Some of the revolutions will in- 
clude the scientific and political (Columbus' di- 
ary), the moral (de las Casas on the Indians), the 
sexual (Nelke's essay on prostitution), or literary 
(Cortazar's short fiction). Conducted in Spanish. 

Elizabeth Rhodes 

RL 603 Spanish American Novel (S: 3) 

Harry L. Rosser 

RL 650 A Social and Intellectual History of 
Medieval Spain (F: 3) 

The focus of the course will be the interplay be- 
tweenjews, Christians, and Muslims in medieval 
Spain, for our purposes from 71 1-1492. We will 



College of Arts & Sciences • Romance Languages and Li i i kal i is 



101 



examine a wide variety of literary, legal, religious, 
and historical sources. Students will have ample 
opportunity to pursue individual research inter- 
ests. All students must have a good reading knowl- 
edge of Spanish, and it would be useful to have 
some ability in Portuguese, Catalan, Latin, Ara- 
bic, or Hebrew. Conducted in Spanish. 

Dwayne E. Carpenter 

RL 655 Andean Novel (F: 3) 

This graduate course will examine the major char- 
acters in the Indian and "Mestizo"'s novel in Bo- 
livia, Ecuador and Peru. Works by Alcides 
Arguedas, Jorge Icaza, Jose Maria Arguedas, Ciro 
Alegria, Gonzalo Zaldumbide, Juan Leon Mera 
and others will be examined in the context of the 
sociological studies written on the "Mestizo" and 
the Indian of the Andes. Conducted in Spanish. 

J. Emique Ojeda 

RL 656 Medieval Spanish Literature (F: 3) 

This course covers the evolution of Spanish lit- 
erature from 1100-1500. We will examine the 
development of oral literature, the beginnings of 
Spanish as a written language in the scientific and 
didactic prose of the High Middle Ages, and the 
first attempts at an artistic use of the vernacular 
in the late Middle Ages. Medieval social, religious, 
and historical currents will be emphasized as back- 
ground for understanding the texts. Conducted 
in Spanish. Dwayne E. Carpenter 

RL 658 Don Quijote (Spanish) (F: 3) 

This course is an in-depth study of Cervantes' 
greatest book and the literary tradition that in- 
spired it, as well as the one that it, in turn, made 
possible. Study of nineteenth- and twentieth-cen- 
tury interpretations of Don Quijote is included. 
Class and readings in Spanish. For advanced un- 
dergraduates and graduate students. 

Elizabeth Rhodes 

RL 667 Generation of 98 (S: 3) 

Detailed study of the essays, novels, poetry and 
theater of the principal turn of the century writ- 
ers, Unamuno, Baroja, Antonio Machado, 
"Azorin," and others. The Department 

RL 670 Spanish American Civilization (S: 3) 

The civilization and "culture" of a people is more 
than aesthetic expressions through its arts — be it 
architecture, sculpture, music, painting, theater 
and literature. It also integrates the customs, ideas 
and values of the people that determine it. The 
primary objective of this course is to explore the 
historical-aesthetic solidarity of a vast region of 
the world that continues to seek and establish its 
true Latin American identity. Conducted in Span- 
ish. Harry L. Rosser 

RL 680 Jorge Luis Borges (F: 3) 

An examination of Borges as a short story writer, 
and a close reading of Historia universal de la 
infamia, Ficciones, ElAleph, and some of his latest 
narratives. The course will start delineating some 
of his major themes, such as reality and image, the 
world as a book, his conception of time, the im- 
possible quest, etc. Conducted in Spanish. 

Guillemio Guitarte 



The following graduate courses are available 
to advanced undergraduates with the permission 
of the Department. 

RL 934 Currents of Heresy in Catholic Imperial 
Spain (S: 3) 

Unamuno reminds us that all orthodoxy begins 
as heresy. This is nowhere more evident than in 
Golden Age Spain and the process of her rise and 
fall. This seminar examines the authors and texts 
that threatened Catholic Spain's global hegemony 
in the early sixteenth century, and the process 
leading to that network's breakdown. Of primary 
consideration are the intellectual and religious 
currents which prospered under the aegis of hu- 
manism, the historical and mythological power of 
the Spanish Inquisition as it molded humanism to 
political and religious ends, and the conservative 
impetus of censorship which brought an end to 
Spain's Golden Age. Literary and historic texts, 
including some unedited manuscripts and docu- 
ments, are studied in chronological order. 
Women writers are included among the heretics 
and women's participation in the cultural heresy 
(i.e. non-literary) is studied. Very advanced lan- 
guage skills required, familiarity with Spanish 
history recommended. Elizabeth Rhodes 

RL 961 The Dynamics of Dissent in the Spanish 
American Novel (F: 3) 

A study of the ideological formation and stylistic 
development of major Spanish American novel- 
ists of the 20th century, with special attention to 
the "Boom" and "Post-Boom" periods. Works by 
such writers as Alejo Carpentier, Carlos Fuentes, 
Mario Vargas Llosa, Isabel Allende, Gabriel 
Garcia Marquez, Elena Poniatowska, among oth- 
ers, will be examined in detail. Focus on structure, 
characterization and use of language will lead to 
an understanding of the directions that genre has 
taken in recent decades. Conducted in Spanish. 

Hany L. Rosser 

RL 962 Modernism© y Vanguardia: The Swan 
and The Owl-The Lyric Poetry of Spanish 
America (S: 3) 

The course intends to study the two most impor- 
tant periods in the development of the Spanish 
American lyric poetry. The first half of the semes- 
ter will analyze the origins, development and final 
demise of the Modernismo, concentrating on its 
outstanding figures: mainly Marti and Ruben 
Dario. The other half will study the Vanguardia 
tracing its multifaced programs and its influence 
exercised on the best known Spanish American 
poets of this century: Vallejo, Neruda, Carrera 
Andrade, Paz, among others. Conducted in Span- 
ish . J. Enrique Ojeda 

RL 966 Contemporary Spanish Drama (F: 3) 

An intensive examination of contemporary Span- 
ish theater, emphasizing the post-war period. The 
course will include theoretical readings, in addi- 
tion to primary texts. The Department 

Projected Spanish Offerings, 1993-94 

RL 602 Spanish Literature Through Film (F: 3) 

J. Enrique Ojeda 

RL 604 Spanish American Short Story (S: 3) 

Harry L. Rosser 

RL 605 Contemporary Spanish Drama (F: 3) 

The Department 



RL 656 Spanish American Romanticism (F: 3) 

J. Enrique Ojeda 

RL 659 Passion at Play: An Introduction to Golden 
Age Drama and Poetry (F: 3) Elizabeth Rhodes 

RL 663 Contemporary Spanish Novel (F: 3) 

The Department 

RL 675 Spanish American Essay (S: 3) 

Hany L. Rosser 

RL 677 Contemporary Spanish Poetry (S: 3) 

The Department 
RL 901 Stylistics Analysis (S: 3) Elizabeth Rhodes 

RL 905 History of the Spanish Language (P. 3) 
Dwayne E. Carpenter 

RL 93 Cervantes (S: 3) Elizabeth Rhodes 

RL 970 Colonial Literature (F: 3) Harry L. Rosser 

RL 978 Spanish American Lyric Poetry (S: 3) 

J. Enrique Ojeda 

Projected Spanish Offerings, 1 994-95 

RL 600 Escribir, Descubrir (S: 3) Elizabeth Rhodes 

RL 603 Spanish American Novel (F: 3) 

Hany L. Rosser 

RL 606 Topics in Modern Spain The Department 
RL 657 19th Century Romanticos (F: 3) 

J. Enrique Ojeda 
RL 669 Escritoras Hispanicas (S: I) Elizabeth Rhodes 
RL 670 Spanish American Civilization (S: 3) 

Hany L. Rosser 
RL 679 Contemporary Spanish Society, Literature 
and Film (S: 3) The Department 

RL 691 Spanish Lyric Poetry (F: 3) 

Dwayne E. Carpenter 
RL 935 Non-Canonical Approach to St. Teresa of 
Avila: Spanish Mysticism (F: 3) Elizabeth Rhodes 
RL 958 Age of Galdos (S: 3) J. Enrique Ojeda 

RL 964 Generation of '27 (S: 3) The Department 
RL 982 Spanish American Short Story (S: 3) 

Hany L. Rosser 

Language and Methodology Courses 
Offered in English, 1992-93 

RL 495 (ED 303) Second-Language Acquisition 

(F:3) 

A review of recent research in second language 
acquisition and its application to the classroom. 
Emphasis is placed on techniques for developing 
proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and 
writing. Students will analyze available audio-vi- 
sual materials and learn how to integrate these 
ancillaries into their instruction. 

This course fulfills the Massachusetts certifi- 
cation requirements in Secondary Methods. 

Rebecca I 'alette 

Projected Offerings in Language and 
Methodology, 1993-94 

RL 495 Second Language Acquisition (F: 3) 

Rebecca I 'alette 

RL 498 Oral Proficiency Testing (S: 3) 

Rebecca I 'alette 

RL 572 The Comparative Development of the 
Romance Languages (S: 3) Laurie Sbepard 

Honors Program 

RL 698 Honors Research Seminar (F: 3) 

Betty T. Rahv 

RL 699 Honors Thesis Seminar (S: 3) 

Betty T Rahv 



102 • College of Aris & Sciences • Slavic and Eastern Languages 



Slavic and Eastern Languages 



FACULTY 

Michael J. Connolly, Associate Professor, Chair- 
person of the Department: A.B., Boston College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Michael B. Kreps, Associate Professor: Diploma, 
Leningradskij gosudarstvennij universitet; 
MA, Ph.D., University of California (Berke- 
ley) 

Margaret Thomas, Assistant Professor: B.A. 
Yale University; M.Ed., Boston University; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jovina Y. H. Ting, Adjunct Assistant Professor: 
A.B., Guoli Taiwan Daixue; M.A., Kent State 
University; M.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., 
New York University. 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 

The Department administers undergraduate 
majors in General Linguistics, in Russian, and in 
Slavic Studies, as well as a minor program in Asian 
Studies and in Russian and East European Studies. 
Each major program requires at least twelve one- 
semester courses at upper-division levels (courses 
numbered 200 and above). Departmental honors 
require nomination by the faculty and successful 
completion of honors comprehensive require- 
ments. 

The Department maintains listings of related 
courses from other departments which satisfy 
various program requirements. Substitutions and 
exemptions from specific program requirements, 
as well as the application of courses from other 
institutions, require express permission from the 
Chairperson. 

Major in Linguistics 

The focus of the linguistics program does not lie 
in the simple acquisition of language skills, but 
rather in the analysis of linguistic phenomena with 
a view toward learning to make significant gen- 
eralizations about the nature of language. 

Students majoring in Linguistics build their 
programs around a specific area of concentration, 
the most common of which is Philology. The fol- 
lowing listing represents the normal program for 
this concentration. 

• General Linguistics (SL 31 1/KN 527) 

• five courses of a philological nature 

• three courses of a language-related nature from 
non-language departments 

• three linguistics "topics" courses. 

The Department expects students concentrat- 
ing in Philology to have proficiency in at least one 
classical and one modern language and to acquire 
a familiarity with at least two additional language 
areas. 

The Department can provide requirements 
for other concentrations, such as Psycholinguist ks 
or Speech Pathology, upon request The College oi 
Arts and Sciences also offers an undergraduate 
minor in Cognitive Sciences including Linguistics. 



Major in Russian 

The normal program for the major in Russian 
concentrates on acquiring advanced proficiency 
in the language and an ability to comprehend and 
analyze important aspects of Russian literature 
and culture. 

• four courses in Russian grammar, composition 
and stylistics beyond the intermediate level 

• four courses on Russian literature, of which at 
least two must be at the 300 level 

• one course in General Linguistics 

• Old Russian or Old Church Slavonic 

• two electives from Russian literature, second 
Slavic languages, or linguistics offerings. 

The Department also recommends at least 
two courses from related areas in other depart- 
ments; e.g. in Russian history, art, political sci- 
ence, economics, philosophy, theology, etc. 

Major in Slavic Studies 

The interdisciplinary major in Slavic Studies pro- 
vides broadly based training in scholarship about 
Russia, the Soviet Union, and the nations of East- 
ern Europe. 
The normal program for this major requires: 

• two Russian language courses beyond the inter- 
mediate level 

• two courses on Russian literature; 

• Old Church Slavonic or Old Russian or a sec- 
ond Slavic/East European language 

• two courses on Russian or Soviet or East Euro- 
pean history 

• one course on Russian or Soviet philosophy; 

• one course on Soviet or East European politics; 

• one course on Soviet economics 

• two electives from an emphasis area 

The Department strongly recommends PO 080/ 
HS 272 (Introduction to Russian, Soviet and East 
European Studies) as an early course in this ma- 
jor. 

Minor in Asian Studies 

This interdisciplinary minor requires: 

• one course in Asian history 

• one additional course in Asian history or one 
course in Asian politics or diplomacy 

• two courses in an Asian language beyond the 
elementary level 

• two approved elective courses in Asian Studies, 
from related areas such as: Art History, Philoso- 
phy, Theology, Political Science, Literature or a 
second Asian language. One of these electives may 
be a directed senior research paper on an ap- 
proved topic. 

Minor in Russian and East European 
Studies 

The Russian and East European Studies minor 
requires six approved courses, distributed as fol- 
lows: 

• one introductory course (PO 080/1 IS 272, In- 
troduction to Russian, Soviet and East European 
Studies) 

• one additional course in Russian or East Euro- 
pean history or politics 



• two courses in Russian or another East Euro- 
pean language at the intermediate or upper-divi- 
sion level 

• two approved elective courses from related ar- 
eas such as: Philosophy, Theology, Economics, 
Literature or language, Political Science, History, 
Education, Art History or film Studies. One of 
these electives may be a directed senior research 
paper on an approved topic. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Courses offered annually are so marked; all other 
courses are offered as parts of varying course 
cycles, and information for any given year may be 
found in the Registrar's Schedule of Courses. 

SL 009-010 Elementary Chinese l/ll (F: 4-S: 4) 

An introduction to the fundamentals of modern 
Chinese (Mandarin) grammar and vocabulary. 
Exercises in pronunciation and sentence struc- 
ture; development of basic conversation, reading, 
and character writing skills. Additional conversa- 
tion and language-laboratory work required. Of- 
fered annually Nancy Hodes 

SL 023-024 Elementary Japanese l/ll (F: 4-S: 4) 

An introduction to the study of Modern Japanese. 
The course is designed to develop simultaneously 
the fundamental skills: reading ability, aural com- 
prehension, oral and written self-expression. Ex- 
ercises in pronunciation, grammar and reading. 
Additional language-laboratory drill available. 

Takako Minami 
Mikako Sato 

SL 027-028 (EN 093-094) Introduction to 
Modern Irish l/ll (F: 3-S: 3) 

A course for beginners in standard modern Irish, 
with attention to regional variants, especially that 
of Conamara. The course is intended to develop 
both conversational and compositional skills and 
the ability to read Irish prose. Additional language 
laboratory work required. Offered annually. 

Fionnuala MacLochlainn 

SL 051-052 Intermediate Russian l/ll (F: 3-S: 3) 

A review of major difficulties in Russian grammar 
with extensive practice in reading, translation, 
paraphrase and analysis of selected Russian texts. 
Students who plan to continue the study of Rus- 
sian beyond the intermediate level should also 
enroll in the concurrent practicum SL 157-158. 
Offered annually Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 061-062 Intermediate Chinese l/ll (F: 3-S: 3) 

Continuation of course work in spoken and writ- 
ten modern Chinese (Mandarin) with extensive 
practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writ- 
ing, as well as the development of specialized vo- 
cabularies and cultural dimensions. 

Jovina Y-H Ting 

SL 063-064 Intermediate Japanese III (F: 3-S: 3) 

Continuation of course work in spoken and writ- 
ten Japanese with extensive practice in listening, 
speaking, reading, and writing. Conducted mostly 
in Japanese. Offered annually. Emiko Aoha 



College of Arts & Sciences • Slavic: and Eastern Languages • 103 



SL 067-068 (EN 097-098) Continuing Modern 
Irish Ml (F: 3-S: 3) 

See course description under EN 097-098. 

Philip O'Leary 

SL 1 1 1-1 12 (EN 041-042) English for Foreign 
Students: Intermediate l/ll (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course enables Boston College students and 
personnel whose native language is not English 
to acquire the fluency and skill in English speak- 
ing, listening, writing and reading necessary to 
function satisfactorily academically and socially in 
the Boston College community. 

It is intended for international students only, 
and is not for beginning students. 

In the first semester the emphasis lies on 
speaking and listening with understanding, ac- 
companied by writing assignments and the read- 
ing of short stories. The sounds and structures of 
English are examined. The second semester is a 
continuation of the first, with a quick grammati- 
cal review, and with greater concern for reading 
short stories and a novel, and for expository writ- 
ing. 

SL 111-112 is a credit course for undergradu- 
ates; but does not fulfill the Core Requirement in 
English. Graduate students, staff, and faculty 
spouses may take the course for non-credit. 

Margaret A. Thomas 

SL 113-1 14 (EN 043-044) English for Foreign 
Students: Advanced l/ll (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is designed to fulfill the core require- 
ment in English for students whose native lan- 
guage is not English. It is not intended for for- 
eign students whose competence in English is 
very close to that of native students. Such students 
should enroll in EN 021-022. 

Grammar, pronunciation, the structure of the 
English sentence and expository writing are dis- 
cussed both semesters. The literature read criti- 
cally includes the short story and novel in the first 
semester, and drama and poetry in the second. 

Raymond G. Biggar 
James Sullivan 

SL 157-158 Praktika russkoj rechi l/ll 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Intermediate Russian or 
equivalent. 

A special practicum for the development of 
active skills in Russian. Extensive vocabulary 
work, grammar drills, conversation, pereskaz and 
composition for students who intend to continue 
to an advanced level. Conducted in Russian. Offered 
annually Lidia Bukhbinder 

SL 163-164 Chukyu kaiwa l/ll (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Intermediate Japanese or 
equivalent. 

A special practicum for the development of 
active skills, especially speaking, in Japanese. Ex- 
tensive vocabulary work, grammar drills, conver- 
sation, descriptive narration, and composition for 
students who intend to continue to an advanced 
level. Conducted in Japanese. Offered annually 



SL 205 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (in translation) 

A comparative presentation of Russia's two ma- 
jor writers. Their different perceptions of reality, 
their views on art, civilization, Christian ethics, 
etc., are discussed in connection with their prin- 
cipal novels. Conducted entirely in English. Of- 
fered biennially Michael B. Kreps 

SL 206 (EN 206) (SC 206) Society, Language 
and Communication (3) 

Problems and studies in linguistic science pre- 
sented for students of neighboring disciplines; 
modern theories of sound, form and meaning; the 
nature of language and linguistic structures; lin- 
guistic and cultural change. Original language- 
oriented research is an essential part of the course. 

Margaret A. Thomas 

SL 216 (EN 552) Poetic Theory (3) 

Traditional and contemporary theories of 
prosody and metre described and analyzed within 
the framework of modern structural and genera- 
tive approaches to language as well as from the 
viewpoint of (Russian) Formalism. Textual ma- 
terial is mainly English, although students may 
present texts in any language for required papers. 
Conducted entirely in English. Offered bienni- 
ally Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 221 (TH 198) The Language of Liturgy (S: 3) 

The application of structural techniques to an 
analysis of liturgical form both in the poetic-reli- 
gious context of the language of worship and in 
the more broadly based systems of non-verbal 
symbolism (music, gesture, vestments and ap- 
pointments). Offered triennially M. J. Connolly 

SL 222 Classics of Russian Literature (in 
translation) (3) 

A survey of major works, authors, and movements 
in Russian literature from the twelfth century up 
to the Russian Revolution. Conducted entirely in 
English. Offered biennially Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 227 Advanced Russian Grammar (F: 3) 

Intensive reading of difficult Russian texts, trans- 
lation from English into Russian, correct exposi- 
tory composition and a review of fine points of 
Russian grammar. Conducted in Russian. Offered 
annually Michael B. Kreps 

SL 230 Russian Literature of the Fantastic (in 
translation) (3) 

A study of grotesque, bizarre, surrealistic, super- 
natural, and fantastic themes in a wide range of 
Russian short stories and novels by writers such 
as Gogol, Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, 
Bulgakov, Leskov, Nabokov, and Sinyavsky, as 
well as in the genre of science fiction. Western 
literary parallels in the works of E.T.A. Hoffman, 
de Maupassant, Poe, Kafka, and others. Con- 
ducted entirely in English. Offered biennially 

Michael B. Kreps 

SL 234 The Polish Language (S: 3) 

An intensive and rapid introduction to the pho- 
nology and grammar of Polish and the reading of 
literary and expository texts. 

Recommended: Prior experience with a Slavic 
language. Michael B. Kreps 



SL 240 The Contemporary Russian Novel (in 
translation) (3) 

A reading, in English, of major Russian novels of 
the twentieth century from Arcybashev to 
Solzhenicyn; the development of the genre from 
realism through modernism. Conducted entirely 
in English. Offered biennially Michael B. Kreps 

SL 243 Image and Icon in Russian Literature (in 
translation) (3) 

A study of verbal images in Russian literature and 
a comparison of these with works in Russian vi- 
sual art, from the early icon tradition through to 
the modern period. An examination of the detail 
of delineation, of the role of context in the speci- 
fication of the imaging process and of parallels in 
visual art to the role of dialogue in verbal art. 
Conducted entirely in English. 
Offered biennially Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 245-246 Advanced Chinese l/ll (F: 3-S: 3) 

A review of difficult points of Chinese grammar 
and sentence structure, with extensive practice in 
composition and conversation and in the reading 
and analysis of selected modern Chinese newspa- 
per articles, short stories and texts. Readings also 
include an introduction to Classical Chinese. 
Conducted entirely in Chinese. Jovina Y-H Ting 

SL 257-258 Advanced Japanese l/ll (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: SL 164 (Chukyu kaiwa II) or equiva- 
lent. 

A review of Japanese grammar and sentence 
structure, extensive practice in composition and 
conversation, the reading and analysis of selected 
Japanese literary prose, poetry, and expository 7 
prose. Conducted entirely in Japanese. 

Emiko Aoba 

SL 260 (EN 100) Advanced Readings in Modern 
Irish (F, S: 3) 

See course description under EN 100. 

Philip O'Leary 

SL 261 Love and Nature in Far Eastern 
Literatures (in translation) (S: 3) 

An introduction to the literary traditions of the 
major East Asian cultures through reading and 
discussion, in English, of representative Chinese, 
Japanese and Korean lyrical poetry and prose 
from ancient times to the present. Themes exam- 
ined include: human relationships, mankind and 
nature, the individual and society. An exploration 
of some eastern concepts of poetics and literary 
theory in the context of general philosophical 
thought. Comparisons and connections among 
the individual traditions and across time. Offered 
biennially Nancy Hodes 

SL 262 Gods and Men in Far Eastern Literatures 
(in translation) (S: 3) 

Offered biennially Nancy Hodes 

SL 263 Far Eastern Civilizations (F: 3) 

An overview of the ancient and modern cultures 
of the Far East with emphases on China, Japan 
and Korea and with a consideration of cultural 
currents from neighboring India, Mongolia, and 
Manchuria. Selected illustrative topics from lit- 
erature and language, history and politics, 



104 • College of Arts & Sciences • Slavic and Eastern Languages 



economy and social structures, philosophy and 
religion, art and archaeology. Strongly recom- 
mended tor Asian Studies students. No prereq- 
uisites. Lectures and readings in English. Offered 
biennially Nancy Hodes 

SL 264 The Western Discovery of the East (F: 3) 

An exploration of major figures and events in the 
episodic "discover) - " and "rediscovery" of the 
cultures and peoples of the Far East by Western- 
ers, figures include: medieval religious and com- 
mercial visitors; Marco Polo; Jesuit missionaries 
such as Francis Xavier and Matteo Ricci; Ernest 
Fellosa and Lafcadio Hearn; Imagist poets and 
modern artists; twentieth-century revolutionar- 
ies. Themes include: commerce and technology; 
religion and ideology; literature and the arts; con- 
flict and cooperation. Emphasis lies on Western 
awareness of the East, but with some attention to 
influences in the other direction and to the re- 
sponses of various Asian cultures to Western 
ideas. Offered biennially Nancy Hodes 

SL 265 The Dissonant Muse (3) 

Offered biennially Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 307 Russian Drama (3) 

A close study of selected works in this genre from 
Fonvizin through Tolstoj, Chexov, Blok and 
Majakovskij to the modern theater. The structure 
of the drama and the techniques of the romantic 
and the realist will be examined. Lectures and 
readings entirely in Russian. Offered triennially 

Michael B. Kreps 

SL 308 Dostoevskij and Tolstoj (3) 
A study and analysis of realism in the works of two 
of Russia's most influential writers. Readings and 
selected criticism. Conducted in Russian. Offered 
triennially Michael B. Kreps 

SL 31 1 (EN 527) General Linguistics (F: 3) 

An introduction to the history and techniques of 
the scientific study of language in its structures 
and operations: articulatory and acoustic phonol- 
ogy, morphological analysis, historical recon- 
struction, and syntactic models. Offered annually 

M.J. Connolly 

SL 316 Old Church Slavonic (F: 3) 

The origins and development of the Slavic lan- 
guages; the linguistic structure of Old Church 
Slavonic and its relation to modern Slavic lan- 
guages, illustrated through readings in Old 
Church Slavonic texts. 

Recommended: Prior study of a Slavic lan- 
guage. Offered biennially M.J. Connolly 

SL 317 Old Russian (F: 3) 
An intensive study of the grammar and philology 
of Old Russian and early Fast Slavic; readings in 
Russian secular and religious texts from the 
Kievan period through the seventeenth century; 
Russian Church Slavonic as a liturgical language. 
Recommended: Prior study of a Slavic lan- 
guage. Offered biennially M.J. Connolly 

SL 320 Pushkin and Gogol' (3) 
Close readings of the major works of Pushkin and 
Gogol' as well as related works of Lermontov. 
Individual literary techniques and styles are stud- 
ied against the background of Russian romanti- 
cism and the transition to Russian realism. Con- 
ducted in Russian. Offered triennially 

Michael B. Kreps 



SL 321 Turgenev and his Contemporaries (3) 

The aesthetic and ideological values of 
Turgenev's works; Turgenev's role in literary 
circles of the mid- 19th century in Russia and 
abroad. Students also explore writings of the pe- 
riod (e.g. Goncharov and Ostrovskij) for their 
polemical and ideological content. Conducted in 
Russian. Offered triennially Michael B. Kreps 

SL 325 (EN 528) Historical Linguistics (S: 3) 

The phenomenon of language change and of lan- 
guages, dialects, and linguistic affinities, examined 
through the methods of comparative linguistics 
and internal reconstruction. Offered triennially 

M.J. Connolly 

SL 327 Sanskrit (S: 3) 

The grammar of the classical language of India, 
supplemented through reading selections from 
the classical literature and an introductory study 
of comparative Indo-Iranian linguistics. Offered 
triennially M.J. Connolly 

SL 328 Classical Armenian (S: 3) 

A grammatical analysis of Armenian grabar, the 
classical literary language current from the fifth 
century A.D. Sample readings from the Classical 
Armenian scriptural, patristic, liturgical, and his- 
torical texts. Offered triennially M. J. Connolly 

SL 332 The Russian Short Story (3) 

The development and structure of the Russian 
rasskaz and povest' from the 16th through the 20th 
centuries. Readings in Russian. Offered trienni- 
ally Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 333 Introduction to the West Slavic 
Languages (S: 3) 

A grammatical and phonological study of a fea- 
tured West Slavic language (Czech, Polish or Slo- 
vak), structural sketches of the other West Slavic 
languages, inductive readings in West Slavic texts. 
Recommended: Prior study of a Slavic lan- 
guage. Offered biennially Lawrence G Jones 

SL 334 Introduction to the South Slavic 
Languages (S: 3) 

A grammatical and phonological study of a fea- 
tured South Slavic language (Serbo-Croatian, 
Bulgarian, Slovenian or Macedonian), structural 
sketches of the other South Slavic languages, in- 
ductive readings in South Slavic texts. 

Recommended: Prior study of a Slavic lan- 
guage. Offered biennially Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 339 (EN 234) Semiotics and Structure (3) 

Theoretical and practical considerations for the 
use of modern semiotic and structural techniques 
in the analysis of paralinguistic systems, literature, 
mythology and other products of social commu- 
nication. Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 342 Seminar in Russian Poetry (3) 

Detailed study of the style, structure and thematic 
content of works from a selected group of Rus- 
sian poets. Texts in Russian. Offered triennially 

Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 343 (EN 512) Old Irish (S: 3) 

A descriptive and historical examination of the 
linguistic features of Old Irish among the Celtic 
and Indo-European languages; the reading of 
Farly Irish texts. Offered triennially 

M.J. Connolly 



SL 344 (EN 392) Syntax and Semantics (S: 3) 

An introduction to the concepts and operations 
of modern transformational-generative grammar 
and related models. Linguistic theories of mean- 
ing. Offered triennially M. J. Connolly 

Margaret Thomas 

SL 348 Chexov (3) 

A close reading in Russian of some of Chexov's 
major prose, along with a survey of the critical 
literature on his works and a brief study of the 
influence of his style on later Russian writers. 
Offered triennially Lawrence G Jones 

SL 349 Advanced Russian Writing and 
Translation (S: 3) 

A study of the subtleties of Russian syntax, vo- 
cabulary and style through extensive analytic 
reading and through both imitative and original 
writing; the theory and practice of preparing re- 
fined translations both from and into Russian. 
Conducted entirely in Russian. Offered annually 

Michael B. Kreps 

SL 352 Russian Literary Humor and Satire (3) 

A survey of theories of humor with readings from 
selected Russian satirical and comic literature 
from the 18th to the 20th century. Conducted 
entirely in Russian. Offered triennially 

Michael B. Kreps 

SL 353 Romantizm v russkoj literature (3) 

A study of Romanticism in Russian poetry, drama, 
and narrative literature of the 19th century. A 
close analysis of the features of this literary move- 
ment in works of Zhukovskij, Marlinskij, Pushkin, 
Lermontov and others. Romantic literature as a 
genre within a larger European framework. Con- 
ducted entirely in Russian. Offered triennially 

Michael B. Kreps 

SL 358 The Linguistic Structure of Japanese (3) 

The phonological and writing systems of Japanese 
and their origins; fundamentals of Japanese syn- 
tax and characteristics of Japanese vocabulary. 

A linguistic outline of the Japanese language 
for students with some previous exposure to Lin- 
guistics or to Japanese (but not necessarily to 
both). Offered biennially Margaret A. Thomas 

SL 360 (EN 660) The Teaching of English as a 
Foreign Language (3) 

An overview of theories of foreign-language ac- 
quisition and an examination of classic problems 
in the teaching and learning of English by speak- 
ers of other languages. For students with a pro- 
fessional interest in teaching English to non-na- 
tive speakers, for those interested in the structure 
of the English language, and for those curious 
about how adults learn a foreign language. 

Recommended: Previous coursework in Lin- 
guistics or familiarity with at least one foreign 
language. Offered annually Margaret A. Thomas 

SL 361 (PS 261) Psycholinguistics (F: 3) 

An exploration, from a linguistic perspective, of 
some classic issues at the interface of language and 
mind. Topics include: the organization of lan- 
guage in the human brain; the acquisition of lan- 
guage acquisition both by children and by adults; 
animal communication; the psychological reality 
of grammatical models; the innateness hypothesis; 
the production, perception, and processing of 
speech. 



College of Arts & Sciences • Sociology • 105 



Recommended: Some background in Linguis- 
tics or Psychology. Offered biennially 

Margaret A. Thomas 

Research courses 

The following tutorials and courses of reading and 
research are intended solely for students who have 
exhausted present course offerings or are doing 
thesis work on advanced topics. The precise sub- 
ject matter and scheduling are determined by ar- 
rangement and such courses may be repeated for 
credit. 

SL 388 Senior Honors Project 
SL 390 Advanced Tutorial: Russian Language 
SL 391 Advanced Tutorial: Russian Literature 
SL 392 Advanced Tutorial: Linguistics 
SL 393 Advanced Tutorial: Chinese 
SL 394 Advanced Tutorial: Slavic Linguistics 
SL 395 Advanced Tutorial: Japanese 
SL 396 Advanced Tutorial: Polish 
SL 399 Scholar-of-the-College Project 
SL 791 Russian Literature: Reading and Research 
SL 792 Linguistics: Reading and Research 
SL 794 Slavic Linguistics: Reading and Research 

Other Courses 

Other courses in the Department's repertory, 

offered on a non-periodic basis, include: 

SL 007-008 Introduction to Arabic I/II 

SL 059 Readings from Russian Intellectual History 

SL 065-066 Continuing Arabic I/II 

SL 225 Russian Folklore (in translation) 

SL 226 Readings in Russian Short Prose 

SL231 Slavic Civilizations 

SL 233 (EN 571) Applied English Grammar and 

Style 

SL 235 Chekhov's Plays and Stories (in translation) 

SL 236 A Survey of Polish Literature (in 
translation) 

SL 237 Sounds of Language and Music 

SL 238 The Language of Computing 

SL 244 (EN 099) The Irish Language 

SL 254 (TH 154) History of Eastern Orthodoxy 

SL 305 History of the Russian Language 

SL 306 Russian Literary Research 

SL 312 The Indo-European Languages 

SL 3 13 Structural Poetics 

SL 3 14 Old Persian and Avestan 

SL 3 1 5 The Czech Language 

SL 322 The Structure of Modern Russian 

SL 335 Early Russian Literature 

SL 337 Comparative Slavic Linguistics 

SL 338 Tolstoy & Solzhenicyn 

SL 341 The Study of Russian Literature 

SL 351 Topics in Linguistic Theory 

SL 354 Bulgakov, Pasternak, Solzhenicyn 

SL 355 Linguistics and Computing 

SL 356 Classics in Linguistics 

SL 359 The Structure of Biblical Hebrew 

SL362 Sociolinguistics 

Information on these courses and their availabil- 
ity may be received from the Department. 



O C I o 



FACULTY 

John D. Donovan, Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity 

Severyn T. Bruyn, Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Charles K. Derber, Professor; A.B., Yale Uni- 
versity, Ph.D., University of Chicago 

William A. Gamson, Professor; A.B., Antioch 
College, A.M., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Jeanne Guillemin, Professor; A.B., Harvard 
University; A.M., Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Lynda Lytle Holmstrom, Professor; B.A., 
Stanford University; A.M., Boston University; 
Ph.D., Brandeis University 

David A. Karp, Professor; A.B., Harvard Col- 
lege; Ph.D., New York University 

Ritchie P. Lowry, Professor; A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 

University of California at Berkeley 

David Horton Smith, Professor; A.B., Univer- 
sity of Southern California; A.M., Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

John B. Williamson, Professor; B.S., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Paul S. Gray, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Princeton; A.M., Stanford University; A.M., 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Sharlene J. Hesse-Biber, Associate Professor, 
Chairperson of the Department; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Seymour Leventman, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Washington State College, Chicago; A.M., In- 
diana University; Ph.D., University of Minne- 
sota 

Michael A. Malec, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Loyola University; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue Uni- 
versity 

Stephen J. Pfohl, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Catholic University of America; M.A., Ph.D., 
Ohio State University 

Paul G. Schervish, Associate Professor; A.B., 
University of Detroit; A.M., Northwestern 
University; M.Div., Jesuit School of Theology 
at Berkeley; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Eve Spangler, Associate Professor; A.B., Brook- 
lyn College; A.M., Yale University; M.L.S., 
Southern Connecticut State College; Ph.D., 
University of Massachusetts 

Diane Vaughan, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Lisa Fuentes, Assistant Professor; B.A., Univer- 
sity of the Americas, Mexico; A.M., University 
of California; A.M., Ph.D., Stanford University 



O G Y 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The undergraduate program in Sociology is de- 
signed to satisfy the intellectual and career inter- 
ests of students who are concerned about what is 
happening in their society and in their daily per- 
sonal interactions. The program prepares stu- 
dents for graduate study in sociology, social work, 
urban affairs, governmental administration, cri- 
minal justice, the law, industrial organization, 
education, etc. The sociological perspective in 
general and the technical knowledge and skills 
developed in the program contribute to personal 
growth and are useful in a broad range of occu- 
pations. 

The Social Science Core Requirement 

For non-majors, this requirement may be filled 
by taking any courses numbered SC 001-SC 199 
(except SC 100); the themes of these courses are 
concerned with the many groups that the indi- 
vidual forms — families, tribes, communities, and 
states, and a great variety of social, religious, po- 
litical, business and other organizations that have 
arisen out of living together. 

Some upper-level courses (SC 299-SC 699) 
require a Core course prerequisite. When this 
prerequisite has been satisfied, higher numbered 
courses can fulfill the Social Science Core require- 
ment. 

Requirements for the Major in Sociology 

1 . Either Introductory Sociology (SC 00 1 ) or Prin- 
ciples of Sociology (SC 100) is the first required 
course as a prerequisite for all upper-level courses. 

2 . Statistics (SC 200), Social Theory (SC 215), and 
Research Methods (SC 210); these may be taken 
concurrently with the six required electives. It is 
recommended that Statistics be taken before Re- 
search Methods. 

3. Six electives numbered SC 002-SC 699 (ex- 
cept for SC 100). Of these, at least three must be 
upper-level courses numbered SC 299-SC 699. 

Joint Master's Degree with a 
Sociology Major 

Majors in Sociology have two optional programs 
available which offer students the opportunity to 
earn two degrees over a period of five consecutive 
years. These programs save the time and cost of 
one year of graduate study. 

Option 1 : B.A. and M.A. in Sociology 

Students must apply for admission to this program 
in the spring of their junior year. Some advanced 
placement, language requirement exemption, 
and/or summer school courses may be necessary 
to finish in five years. The B.A. degree will be 
awarded with the student's undergraduate class, 
the M.A. one year later. (For details, consult Prof. 
Sharlene Hesse-Biber.) 

Option 2: B.A. and M.S.W. 

The choice of this program will provide the So- 
ciology major with an undergraduate B.A. degree 
in Sociology and with the professional degree of 
Master of Social Work. The B.A. degree will be 
awarded with the student's undergraduate class, 
the Master's degree one year later. The choice of 
this program should be made by Sociology ma- 



106 • College of Arts & Sciences • Sociology 



jors in their sophomore year so that the required 
course sequences and degree requirements can be 
fulfilled. (For details, consult Prof. Sharlene 
Hesse-Biber.) 

Faith, Peace and Justice Studies 

Sociology' majors may consider concentrating the 
courses taken toward their minor in Faith, Peace, 
and Justice Studies; or, they may supplement their 
major with an interdisciplinary minor in this area. 

In either case, majors must apply to the Di- 
rector of the Faith, Peace, and Justice Program, 
Gasson 109. They must take UN 160, "The Chal- 
lenge of Justice," and design with the Director and 
their Sociology advisor a four-course sequence, 
to be completed by the fall of their senior year. 
This sequence should be the foundation for com- 
pleting the final requirement of the Program, the 
Senior Seminar Paper. 

Some suggested areas include aging and geri- 
atrics; criminology, deviance and social control; 
economy and society; gender roles and human 
rights; medicine and sociology; race relations, 
sources of stratification, inequality and poverty; 
ideology and Utopia. 

For more information, see the section in this 
Catalog on Minors. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
Core 

SC 001 introductory Sociology (F, S: 3) 

This is a Core course in the Social Science area 
designed to provide students with sociological 
angles of vision and hearing and feeling as they 
pertain to their own lives and the lives of others 
around them. Focusing on American society, the 
student will study and analyze the obvious and the 
not-so-obvious features of our changing social 
institutions and should acquire both new insights 
and new critical perspectives. The Department 

SC 003 Introductory Anthropology (F, S: 3) 

This is a survey course designed to familiarize 
students with basic concepts in social anthropol- 
ogy. These include traditional versus modern 
notions of the community, religion, economics 
and politics. The Department 

SC 008 Marriage and the Family (F, S: 3) 

This course will analyze sociological theories and 
research on the family and singlehood with par- 
ticular attention to (a) the family and the broader 
society; (b) the family and the life cycle (e.g., 
courtship, marriage, parenthood); (c) changing 
roles for men and women; and (d) alternative fam- 
ily structures. Lynda Lytle Holmstrom 

SC 022 Crime in America (F, S: 3) 

An introductory course in criminology which 
seeks for an understanding of criminal behavior 
in today's society. Subjects covered include: the 
extent of crime; theories of crime causation; ori- 
gin of the law; and patterns of criminal behavior. 

Alan Fairfax 

Theodore Sasson 

Edward Skeffington 

SC 030 Deviance and Social Control (F, S: 3) 

A wide variety of beliefs and behaviors have been 
considered "deviant" in different cultures and at 
different times. Similarly, an array of techniques 
have been developed to identify and control "de- 



viant" behavior. But what exactly is "deviance"? 
Why is it present even in highly conformist soci- 
eties? Who has the power to decide what is or is 
not "deviant"? How are systems of social control 
organized? Who is subject to and who is exempted 
from social control efforts? How have people re- 
sisted these mechanisms of control? These are 
some of the questions to be explored in this 
course. 

The course will provide a broad historical 
overview of perspectives on deviance and social 
control and will address related contemporary 
issues such as social control in the workplace, elite 
(corporate, political) deviance, the impact of mass 
media, and strategies of resistance. David Croteau 

SC 031 Extraordinary Groups (S: 3) 

This course is an overview of deviant groups in 
society. Taking a variety of examples, from juve- 
nile gangs to the Ku Klux Klan, from religious 
cults to riots, from free sex communes to social 
movement organizations, we look at why people 
join these deviant groups, how the membership 
is different, why such groups form, how they 
maintain their separateness, what they accomplish 
and how they relate to the larger society in which 
they exist. David H. Smith 

SC 032 Business and Society (F, S: 3) 

This course is designed for students interested in 
business careers. We examine the changing role 
of business in society, including issues in corpo- 
rate governance, professional ethics, worker self- 
management, and the social development of work 
systems in American enterprise. We will review 
current trends in corporate accountability, occu- 
pational safety and health, government de-regu- 
lation of industry, social self-regulation, environ- 
mental and consumer protection, ethical invest- 
ing, social auditing, and the changing character 
of multinational corporations. Severyn T. Bruyn 

SC 035 Sociology of Democracy (F: 3) 

The dramatic and historic changes which have 
occurred recently in Eastern Europe have led 
many commentators to proclaim the final victory 
of democracy over totalitarianism. Just what is 
meant by the term "democracy," however, is usu- 
ally taken for granted. Only by subjecting "de- 
mocracy" to a careful analysis can we truly under- 
stand the significance of these historical world 
changes. In this courses, we will critically exam- 
ine the meaning of democracy from a structural, 
sociological perspective. Daniel Egan 

SC 041 (BK 151) Race Relations (F, S: 3) 

An examination of race and ethnic relations in a 
mass society with emphasis on the minority com- 
munity, systems of power and domination, and 
racial and ethnic ideologies in relation to pro- 
cesses of social change. Seymour Leventman 

SC 043 (BK 1 55) Introduction to African- 
American Society (F, S: 3) 

This is an introduction to studies of African 
peoples in the Americas as revealed in the litera- 
ture of the social and behavioral sciences. This 
survey of African-Americans is not chronological, 
but topical. Starting with a working definition of 
culture, the survey radiates outward from views 
on family to those on activities in the community. 
The nexus of politics and religion is covered. The 
survey concludes with perspectives of change. 

William A. Harris 



SC 049 Social Problems (F: 3) 

This course will examine the often unquestioned 
biases of popular myths and social scientific para- 
digms about various social problems, including 
drug abuse, poverty, racial and gender discrimi- 
nation, environmental pollution, corporate devi- 
ance, and war. It is these biases which often ac- 
count for why programs to resolve the problems 
fail. The course will also consider alternative views 
which are based upon an historical, cultural and 
critical perspective. Ritchie P. Lowry 

SC 054 Sports in American Society (S: 3) 

By viewing sport as a social institution, we learn 
how it both shapes and reflects our values, how it 
relates to our political, educational and economic 
systems, and how it deals with problems such as 
violence, racism and sexism. Michael A. Malec 

SC 056 Sociology of Sport (S: 3) 

We will examine sport from varying perspectives 
across many different topics and substantive ar- 
eas. We will examine many of the cliches and 
myths that surround sports, their participants, 
their observers, etc. and attempt to come to a 
greater understanding of why such myths exist, 
discern if there is any "truth" to them, and debunk 
those that are false while simultaneously develop- 
ing an ability to look at sport and society more 
critically. John R. Mitrano 

SC 072 Inequality in America (S: 3) 

This course examines class inequality in Ameri- 
can society. It not only describes how the rich, the 
poor and the middle classes live, but also how they 
relate to one another. Topics covered include the 
strategies used by the rich for maintaining the 
status quo, the hopes cherished by the middle class 
for improving their position, and the obstacles 
that are used to keep the poor in their place. Stu- 
dents can choose between readings that empha- 
size the dynamics of inequality as they are enacted 
by men or by women. Eve Spangler 

SC 079 Social Psychology (F, S: 3) 

This introductory course provides an overview of 
social psychology, which is the study of how a 
person's thoughts, motives, feelings and actions 
affect or are affected by other people. Major top- 
ics covered include person perception, nonverbal 
and verbal communication, persuasion, prejudice 
and discrimination, interpersonal attraction, in- 
timate relationships, helping behavior, aggres- 
sion, social influence and conformity, group pro- 
cesses, law and justice, business, territoriality and 
health. Theories considered are genetic theory 
and sociobiology, learning theory, cognitive 
theory, psychoanalytic theory, and role theory. 

David H. Smith 

SC 084 Mass Media in American Society (S: 3) 

The purpose of this course is to increase your 
understanding of how the mass communication 
system operates, of how and why media products 
take the form that they do, and of how public 
opinion is shaped by these products. The first half 
of the course shows how news is constructed and 
how the media frame the way we think about so- 
cial and political issues. The second half shows 
how news production is organized in the United 
States and how this organization affects what we 
see, hear, and read. William A. Gamson 



College of Arts & Sciences • Sociology • 107 



SC 088 Women and Madness (F: 3) 

This course is a social and historical inquiry into 
the diagnosis and treatment of female mental ill- 
ness. It will examine various intellectual, religious, 
and scientific discourses concerning hysteria from 
ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome through the 
1 6th century witch trials and late 1 9th century and 
early 20th century psychoanalysis. Specific hys- 
terical patients and their doctors will be studied, 
including Blanche Wittmann (Charcot and J. 
Janet), Dora (Freud), Emma Eckstein (Freud and 
Fliess), and Bertha Pappenheim (Breuer and 
Freud). We will examine the fate of incarcerated 
hysterics and females otherwise labelled mentally 
ill. In addition, we will consider anorexia nervosa 
and agoraphobia in a contemporary social context. 
The course will draw upon a range of historical, 
psychological, postmodern, and feminist litera- 
ture. Karen Bettez 

SC 092 Peace or War? The United States and 
The Third World (F, S: 3) 

The Third World — where most of the world's 
population lives — has become increasingly im- 
portant to the world's economy, but remains a 
seething cauldron of revolution and war. While 
not well understood by the American public, the 
United States has been a major player in the wars 
of the Third World. This course explores the 
bloody, often covert, entanglements that have 
defined — and continue to characterize — our own 
government's relations to Central America, 
Southern Africa, the Middle East, and Southeast- 
ern Asia. We will consider the motives for our 
own involvement and then focus on how such 
wars can be stopped and avoided in the future. 

Charles K. Derber 

SC 094 Social Conflict (S: 3) 

The end of the Cold War has not ended the threat 
of war or of violent conflicts within a society. 
Some conflicts that were dormant have now flared 
up. Problems of large-scale, violent conflicts un- 
fortunately remain central in the modern world. 
The probability of nuclear proliferation and the 
use of poison gas make such conflicts even more 
scary. The purpose of the course is to increase 
your understanding of the conditions under which 
social conflicts tend to become violent and how 
they can be resolved non-violently. 

William A. Gamson 

SC 097 Death and Dying (F: 3) 

This course presents a sociological overview of the 
major issues, themes, and controversies in the 
death and dying literature. It should offer an op- 
portunity to formulate and analyze your personal 
opinions on a number of these issues as well as 
expose you to some new ways of looking at them. 
Among the issues to be considered: historical 
trends in life expectancy, attitudes toward death, 
cross-cultural and historical perspectives on 
death, the development of children's understand- 
ing of death, health care for the dying, patient- 
caregiver relationship, the social role of the dy- 
ing patient, funeral practices, bereavement, truth 
telling and the terminal patient, wills, suicide, 
near-death experiences, and social immortality. 

John B. Williamson 

SC 100 Principles of Sociology (F: 3) 

Phis course is an introduction to the field de- 
signed for majors. The focus will be on fundamen- 



tal sociological concepts, theories and methods. 
Because the class will be relatively small and com- 
prised of majors, class discussion will be central. 
We will broadly consider the forces that contrib- 
ute to social order in society including the nature 
of social interaction, group processes, gender 
roles, and socialization. Emphasis will also be put 
on features of "social differentiation" in society 
such as deviance, social stratification, and race 
relations. As time permits, we will analyze such 
selected aspects of social life as aging, bureau- 
cracy, education, and urban problems. Through- 
out discussion of these topics, the guiding prin- 
ciple will be that sociological analysis best displays 
its power when it illuminates the everyday life 
experience of students. David A. Knrp 

SC 144 Legal and Illegal Violence Against 
Women (S: 3) 

This course will analyze the use of violence and 
of the threat of violence to maintain the system 
of stratification by gender. The focus will be on 
rape, incest, spouse abuse, and related topics. 
Strategies for change will also be discussed. 

Lynda Lytle Holmstrom 

SC 1 54 Medical Sociology (F: 3) 

The course will discuss 1) the social creation of 
disease (i.e. social factors that increase one's 
chances of contracting disease) and 2) the medi- 
cal system's response to disease (what happens 
once one is sick). Special emphasis will be placed 
on the power of the professions; clinician-patient 
relationships; medical mistakes; what health and 
illness mean to people; hospitals and other orga- 
nizations within which medical work is done; and 
contemporary debates (e.g., prolongation of life) 
taking place in the medical arena. 

Lynda Lytle Holmstrom 

SC 168 (BK 168) Roots of Radical Black Politics: 
1960-1980 (F: 3) 

This course will explore the modern Black Lib- 
eration Movement (BLM). Prominent organiza- 
tions such as the Student Non-violent Coordinat- 
ing Committee and the Black Panther Party will 
be studied in depth. The era of the Civil Rights, 
Black Liberation and Anti-war Movements in the 
U.S.A. was one of the most tumultuous during 
this century. This class will review the underly- 
ing causes as well as the actual development of the 
BLM in order to address such questions as: Why 
and how did these organizations emerge? What 
did they accomplish? Did these organizations 
succeed or fail? What are the implications of their 
demise? Could they have been more effective? 
Were they a result of a temporary or a permanent 
condition? Charles Pinderhughes 

SC 1 84 Sociology of the Legal Profession (F: 3) 

This course in the area of the sociology of occu- 
pations/professions is of particular interest to stu- 
dents who are "thinking about" or are commit- 
ted to law school and a legal career. Against a 
background of some conceptual considerations 
regarding the professions, the course studies the 
evolution of the legal profession in the United 
States. Special attention is then given to the so- 
cial and psychological characteristics of those 
seeking admission to law schools, to the structure 
of legal education, to the academic and social pro- 
cesses involved in "making a lawyer" and to the 
selective processes that operate in the choice of a 



first job. Attention is also given to the work cul- 
tures of different types of lawyering, to the chang- 
ing structures of the legal profession, and to some 
of the current and developing problems con- 
fronted by American lawyers. John D. Donovan 

Required for Majors 

SC 100 Principles of Sociology or SC 001 
Introductory Sociology 

SC 200 Statistics (F, S: 3) 

An introduction to statistics with an emphasis on 
the use of the Boston College computer facility, 
the use of the VAX, and programming in SPSSX. 
Statistical issues covered include measures of cen- 
tral tendency, measures of dispersion, hypothesis 
testing, measures of correlation, simple regres- 
sion, and one-way analysis of variance. 

Michael A. Make 

SC 210 Research Methods (F, S: 3) 

The overall purposes of this course will be to ac- 
quaint students with the range of research meth- 
ods used in sociological work, to discuss the philo- 
sophical assumptions that underlie a scientific 
approach to the study of social life, and to con- 
sider the interplay of data, method and theory. In 
addition to presentation of specific techniques, we 
will also consider questions surrounding the poli- 
tics and ethics of research in the social sciences. 

William A. Harris 
David A. Karp 

SC 215 Social Theory (F, S: 3) 

The development of theory from the classical 
period of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to con- 
temporary schools such as interactionism, func- 
tionalism, and feminist theory. Paul S. Gray 

Eve Spongier 

Electives 

SC 225 (EN 1 25) (PS 1 25) Introduction to 
Feminisms (F, S: 3) 

A course taught by Women's Studies faculty and 
student-teams under faculty direction to acquaint 
students with a large range of academic and life 
experience topics which have been affected by the 
Women's Studies scholarship. After a preliminary 
meeting the class divides into 12-14 person semi- 
nars which meet once a week to discuss and study 
such issues as women's history, feminist theory, 
sex roles and socialization, gender and health, 
religion, work, literature and essays by and about 
women. The course emphasizes participation and 
collective work on projects. Lorraine Liscio 

SC 242 (BK 242) Black Women and Feminism 

(F:3) 

An examination of the black woman's involve- 
ment in the feminist movement, and of her result- 
ing dilemma. The course will explore the issues 
of double discrimination, the matriarchy, over- 
achievement, male/female relationships, and fear 
of success. These themes will make the connec- 
tions between the political priorities black women 
must set when forced to choose between gender 
and race. A survey of the relationship between the 
Suffragette and other major American women 
activist organizations and Afro-American women 
will be offered. In understanding the complica- 
tions of black women seeking to attain their true 
womanhood, students will gain insight about how 
that impacts on the process of all American 
women. Amanda Houston 



108 • CO! LEG! of Arts & Sciences • Sociology 



SC 249 (BK 249) The Black American Family (F: 3) 

While examining the background necessary to 
understand the historical roots of contemporary 
issues and problems, this course will emphasize 
the American Black family's strength, resource- 
fulness, and ability to survive in an often hostile 
or indifferent society. We will consider Black 
families of underclass, working class, middle class, 
and "elite" or upper class status; one major objec- 
tive will be to analyze and understand both simi- 
larities and differences in how Black families from 
these different strata are structured, function in- 
ternally, relate to and are related to by the wider 
American society, and fit into that society. 

Michael Plummer 

SC 250 (PL 259) (TH 327) Perspectives on War, 
Aggression and Conflict Resolution I (F: 3) 

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of 
various alternatives to war, evaluated on the ba- 
sis of both practical and ethical criteria. Topics 
include ethics of war and conflict, mutual deter- 
rence, arms control and disarmament, economic 
conversion, world government, regionalism, and 
nonviolent resistance. Rein A. Uritam 

SC 251 (PL 269) (TH 328) Perspectives on War, 
Aggression and Conflict Resolution II (S: 3) 

Rein A. Uritam 

SC 268 (BK 268) (PL 268) The History and 
Development of Racism (F, S: 3) 

This course will survey historical forms which 
racism has taken in the United States and will 
identify" past and present methods of opposing 
racism. Major content areas will include a study 
of European antecedents to racism in the U.S., 
including the developing of white attitudes toward 
people of color in Anglo and other societies. The 
institutionalization of racism during the Colonial 
period will be examined with emphasis on judi- 
cial decisions and legislative acts, and the devel- 
opment of the U.S. constitution. Other content 
will focus on the "peculiar institution" of slavery, 
the history of black protest, the abolitionist move- 
ment, Jim Crowism, and the development of the 
Web of Racism as an urban form of racism. 

Horace Seldon 

SC 278 (BK 278) The American Labor 
Movement and the Black Worker (F: 3) 

This course will examine the intricate relationship 
between black workers and the organized labor 
movement, the love-hate affiliation between la- 
bor unions and civil rights organizations, on the 
one hand, and their unity of purpose on the other; 
as well as the successes and failures encountered. 
Issues covered will include the development 
of separate black labor movements, the use of 
black workers as strike breakers, President 
Roosevelt's Executive Order 8802 in June 1941, 
and the present involvement of blacks in the new 
municipal and white collar unions. In-depth at- 
tention will be given to the opposing philosophies 
of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, 
and the resulting impact upon the black worker 
in America. Amanda Houston 

SC 279 (BK 281) American Labor and Civil 
Rights Issues (S: 3) 

The course offers a comprehensive analysis of the 
effects of government policy and employer and 
labor union practices on the status of black work- 
ers. The consequences of automation and tech- 



nological change for black labor, the changing 
judicial perception of employment discrimina- 
tion, the role of federal contract compliance, and 
the effects of anti-poverty programs among the 
urban black population will be studied. We will 
examine the social characteristics of the stable 
black working class that has been central to black 
protest and to community institutions, and con- 
sider the history of the black worker within the 
changing context of racial conflict in American 
society. Amanda Houston 

SC 299 Reading and Research (F, S: 3) 

Independent research on a topic mutually agreed 
upon by the student and professor. Professor's 
written consent must be obtained prior to regis- 
tration. This is not a classroom course 

The Department 

SC 323 Seminar in White Collar Crime (F: 3) 

A consideration of the social implications of in- 
dividual, white collar and organized crime; the 
nature and extent of criminality at various levels 
of society; crime as "deviance" and as an accepted 
element in contemporary society. 

Benedict S. Alper 

SC 334 The Criminal Justice System on Trial (S: 3) 

This seminar aims to present students interested 
in law with a critical examination of the proce- 
dures in the criminal court, including arrest, jail 
and bail, the role of judge and jury, prosecutor and 
defense counsel, the adversary process, plea bar- 
gaining, mediation, restitution and victims' com- 
pensation, conviction and sentencing, probation, 
pardon and parole. Court visits and interviews 
with practitioners in the field will be scheduled. 
Pennission of instructor is required. 

Benedict S. Alper 

SC 338 Probation: Theory and Practice, I (F, S: 3) 

This course provides students an opportunity for 
field work experience as volunteer interns in the 
Probation Office at a nearby District Court, 
where they serve as court aides and assistants to 
judges and to adult and juvenile probation staff. 
A minimum often hours of service is required, to- 
gether with appropriate readings and the keeping 
of a journal. Students are urged to plan to take the 
course during both semesters in order to derive maxi- 
mum benefit from the experience. Permission of 
instructor is required. Benedict S. Alper 

SC 339 Probation: Theory and Practice II (F, S: 3) 

Optional continuation of SC 338. 

Benedict S. Alper 

SC 340 Internship in Sociology (F, S: 3) 

This internship program is designed for students 
who wish to acquire practical work experience in 
a human service, political, social research, or so- 
cial policy agency — private or governmental, 
profit or nonprofit. Students have the primary 
responsibility for locating their own placement 
setting; however, both the instructor and the B.C. 
Internship Program Office in the Career Center 
can be of help. Students need to meet with the 
instructor before registering to get the full details 
about the course and to discuss possible place- 
ments, as they must make arrangements for their 
placements prior to the start of the course. The 
seminar will meet approximately once every other 
week. Permission of the instructor is required. 

John B. Williamson 



SC 344 Legal and Illegal Violence Against 
Women (S: 3) 

This course will analyze the use of violence and 
of the threat of violence to maintain the system 
of stratification by gender. The focus will be on 
rape, incest, spouse abuse, and related topics. 
Strategies for change will also be discussed. 

Lynda Lytle Holmstrom 

SC 346 American Economic Crisis and Social 
Change (S: 3) 

Analysis of foreign and domestic economic crises 
facing the United States in a fiercely competitive 
global economy. The first part of the course ex- 
plores the question of American decline relative 
to Japan and other competitors, multinational 
corporations and the problem of de-industrializa- 
tion, American and Third World debt, and new 
domestic inequality. The second part of the 
course considers innovative social and political 
strategies for revitalization, including new gov- 
ernment strategies such as economic conversion 
and "industrial policy," as well as new corporate 
strategies such as worker participation and work- 
place democracy. Charles K. Derber 

SC 351 Power in Contemporary Society (F: 3) 

This course examines the types and uses of power 
in contemporary society, forms of power, and 
major historical changes. Also examined are the 
role of ruling classes and elites, multinational 
corporations, the military (including the CIA), 
and political decision making by national leaders. 
Of particular importance will be a consideration 
of the characteristics of modern warfare, the lim- 
its of its use as an aspect of foreign policy, and 
alternatives to war. Ritchie P. Lowry 

SC 357 Sociology of Organizations (S: 3) 

This is an introductory course that will be divided 
into two parts. The first part will focus on orga- 
nization structure and internal processes, and how 
these factors affect the organization's ability to 
meet its goals as well as how they affect the lives 
of the organization members. The second part of 
the course will focus on organizations within the 
context of their environments. How does the en- 
vironment affect the organization, and how do 
organizations affect and manage their own envi- 
ronments? J. Joseph Burns 

SC 358 Internship in Mediation, Restitution and 
Victim Compensation I (F, S: 3) 

Settlement of disputes and conflicts outside of the 
traditional criminal court process by means of 
mediation, arbitration and restitution, is one of 
the fastest growing areas of the law. Restitution 
gives a new role to victims in criminal cases. This 
course provides students with an opportunity to 
see first hand the operation of these programs in 
the Greater Boston area and to participate in the 
conflict resolution process. One full day or two 
half-days a week are required. Permission of instruc- 
tor is required. Benedict S. Alper 

SC 378 (PS 600) (SW 600) Introduction to 
Social Work (F, S: 3) 

The purpose of this course is to give students an 
overview of the field of social work. Starting with 
a discussion of the history of social work and the 
relevance of values and ethics to the practice of 
social work, the course then takes up the various 
social work methods of dealing with individuals, 
groups, and communities and their problems. In 



College of Arts & Sciences • Sociology • 109 



addition to a discussion of the theories of human 
behavior that apply to social work interventions, 
the course also examines the current policies and 
programs, issues, and trends of the major settings 
in which social work is practiced. 

Regina 'Grady-LeShane 

SC 380 Clinical Sociology (S: 3) 

William A. Harris 

SC 422 Issues and Topics in Criminology (F, S: 3) 

This independent study course provides the stu- 
dents an opportunity to engage in a variety of 
projects (limited only by their interest and imagi- 
nation) in both field and library research or as 
volunteer interns in a program or agency con- 
cerned with any aspect of crime and delinquency. 
Approval will be given to any well-planned project 
which the student may care to pursue, after a re- 
view of the project by the instructor and periodic 
evaluations thereafter of student progress. Permis- 
sion of instructor is required. Benedict S. Alper 

SC 439 American Society in the Vietnam 
Decade (F: 3) 

An examination of American society as the first 
new nation and first mass society. Tracing the 
cultural and institutional foundations and devel- 
opments of modern-day America, emphasis is on 
the structural roots producing the crises of the 
1960s, the Vietnam Decade. Seymour Leventman 

SC 448 (BK 367) Racism and Ethnic Protest (S: 3) 

Students will study comparative ethnic protest 
movements, recent strategies of minority group 
advancement, and the relationships between rac- 
ism, sexism, and class inequality. The course also 
reviews sociological theory' and tools for analyz- 
ing majority-minority group domination. 

Seymour Leventman 

SC 468 (ED 349) Sociology of Education (S: 3) 

This course will examine the scope and usefulness 
of the sociology of education. A number of criti- 
cal problems will be examined such as: How does 
schooling influence socialization, the social orga- 
nization of knowledge, and the structure of eco- 
nomic opportunity? How do schools as formal 
organizations transmit and institutionalize social 
norms and habits? How do the dynamics of edu- 
cational organization work? Does education gen- 
erate inequality by reproducing social classes? Are 
there any relationships between educational 
achievement and economic opportunity? What 
role does schooling play in modernization and 
social change in less developed societies? The 
course approaches these problems from the diver- 
sity of theoretical approaches and the diversity of 
applications of the sociological knowledge to the 
understanding of education. Ted I. K. Youn 

SC 491 Sociology of the Third World (S: 3) 

A sociological explanation of historical and con- 
temporary events in Asia, Africa, and Latin 
America. This course ties together themes of so- 
cial, political, and economic development. Em- 
phasis is placed on the role of emerging institu- 
tions — political parties, bureaucracies, businesses, 
trade unions, armies, etc. — in meeting the chal- 
lenges of dependency and modernization. 

PaulS. Gray 

SC 509 Feminism and Methodology (S: 3) 

This course examines a range of feminist and sci- 
ence literature which is concerned with issues of 



methodology. We address the following: 1) What 
are the basic assumptions concerning the scien- 
tific method in the existing social science litera- 
ture? 2) Is there a feminist methodology? 3) To 
what degree is science a "cultural institution" in- 
fluenced by economic, social and political values? 
4) To what extent is science affected by sexist at- 
titudes and to what extent does it reinforce them? 
We will examine several research studies which 
employ a "feminist methodology" and those 
which do not. SharleneJ. Hesse- Biber 

SC 51 1 Fieldwork Methods (S: 3) 

This is a one-semester course in the theory and 
practice of fieldwork. Students will develop and 
sharpen analytic and observational skills by doing 
fieldwork in settings of their choice. Topics cov- 
ered include: gaining access, research ethics, es- 
tablishing rapport, creating social theory from 
data, etc. Paul S. Gray 

SC 527 The Evolution of Culture (F: 3) 

This course is an anthropological and sociologi- 
cal study of the origins and development of cul- 
tural life. We will spend the first weeks looking 
at pre-human development before examining the 
evolution of society. The subject matter will cover 
the evolution of sex, politics, kinship, religion, 
music, dance, myth, language and the economy. 

Severyn T. Bruyn 

SC 544 International Organizations (S: 3) 

This course is designed for students interested in 
the social and political structure of world affairs. 
We will examine the role of world law, world 
government, a world court system, multinational 
corporations, the world organization of churches 
and other types of international organizations that 
bear on the issues of war and peace. While some 
students may be interested in exploring the com- 
plex structures of one such organization, the fo- 
cus of the course will be on the interrelationships 
of organizations, their comparative structures, 
their normative life, and their conjoining influ- 
ences as they serve potentially to lay the founda- 
tion for a world community. Severyn T. Bruyn 

SC 545 Urban Life and Culture (F: 3) 

This course examines the dominant images of 
urban life held both by social scientists and mem- 
bers of the society. Since the central motif of the 
course will be on the "social psychology" of city 
life, our guiding question throughout the semes- 
ter will be: "How do persons give meaning to, 
adapt to, and make intelligible their lives as city 
dwellers?" Special attention will be given to gaps, 
omissions and deficiencies in traditional sociologi- 
cal treatments of urban life. Among the key top- 
ics treated will be: 1) the analysis of city life in 
classical sociological theory, 2) the meaning of 
community, 3) the organization of public place 
behavior, 4) urban tolerance, 5) urban social prob- 
lems, and 6) the connection between urbanism 
and suburbanism. David A. Karp 

SC 549 Social Theory and Social Policy (F: 3) 

From the end of President Roosevelt's New Deal 
to the 1960s was a period of unbounded optimism 
in the belief that both public and private social 
policy could resolve America's (and the world's) 
social problems because of the country's wealth 
and political power. By the 1980s, this view was 
replaced by a general pessimism. This seminar 



will examine why this change took place and, es- 
pecially, what impact it had upon the social theo- 
ries which were the basis of earlier social policies. 
The seminar will consider new, more democratic, 
and more responsive theories and polices, as a 
response to the current malaise and general fail- 
ure of most public and private social policies. 

Ritchie P. Lowry 

SC 550 Important Readings in Sociology (S: 3) 

Members of the seminar will read and discuss a 
number of books generally considered significant 
exemplars of the sociological craft. Discussion will 
center on "what makes a particular study good 
sociology." This course is designed to prepare 
students to develop their own research proposals. 

Eve Spangler 

SC 555 Senior Honors Seminar (F: 3) 

This course is required of participants in the So- 
ciology Department Honors Program. Students 
develop a research prospectus which is to be the 
basis of the Senior Thesis. This is an interactive 
seminar stressing hands-on experience. Skills in 
topic selection, research design, and theory con- 
struction are emphasized. Permission of the Depart- 
ment is required. Paul S. Gray 

SC 556 Senior Honors Thesis (S: 3) 

The Department 

SC 564 Seminar on Medical and Family 
Sociology (S: 3) 

This seminar will focus on student research 
projects in the area of medical sociology. 
Permission of the instructor is required. 

Lynda Lytle Holmstrom 

SC 571 The American Economy and Its Future 
(F:3) 

This course is designed for students who want to 
study the economy from a sociological perspec- 
tive. The market economy in this case will be 
viewed as having the potential for social self-regu- 
lation and the possibility of operating competi- 
tively in the public interest. We will look at meth- 
ods for reducing government controls by trans- 
ferring agencies into the private sector as socially 
accountable enterprises with a capacity to imple- 
ment public norms. Attention will be given to 
changes taking place in Eastern Europe. 

Severyn T. Bruyn 

SC 578 Corporate Social Responsibility (S: 3) 

Contemporary capitalism is in crisis as a result of 
the general lack of social responsiveness on the 
part of corporate executives, shareholders, inves- 
tors, and other economic stakeholders. In re- 
sponse, movements have arisen in recent decades 
to respond to this crisis, including: socially re- 
sponsive investing, shareholder and consumer 
action, and corporate training in ethics. This 
seminar, through shared readings and discussions, 
will consider the ways in which these movements 
are responding to the crisis in capitalism. We will 
consider alternative and more productive forms 
of economic and business conduct. 

Ritchie P. Lowry 



no • College of Arts & Sciences • Theology 



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FACULTY 

Stephen F. Brown, Professor; A.B, St. 
Bonaventure University; A.M., Franciscan In- 
stitute; Ph.L., Ph.D., Universit de Louvain 

Lisa Sowle Cahill, Professor; A.B., University 
of Santa Clara; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chi- 
cago 

Robert Daly, S.J., Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 
College; A.M., Catholic University; Dr. Theol., 
University of YVurzburg 

Donald J. Dietrich, Professor, Chairperson of the 
Department: B.S., Canisius College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Harvey Egan, S.J., Professor; B.S., Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute; A.M., Boston College; 
Th.M., Woodstock College; Dr. Theol., Uni- 
versity of Munster (Germany) 

Ernest L. Fortin, A.A., Professor; A.B., As- 
sumption College; S.T.L., University of St. 
Thomas, Rome; Licentiate, University of Paris; 
Doctorate, University of Paris 

Margaret Gorman, R.S.C.J., Adjunct Professor; 
B.A., Trinity College; M.A., Fordham Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Catholic University 

Thomas H. Groome, Professor; A.B., St. 
Patrick's College, Ireland; A.M., Fordham Uni- 
versity; Ed.D., Columbia Teachers College 

David Hollenbach, S.J., Flatley Professor; B.S., 
St. Joseph's University; M.A., Ph.L., St. Louis 
University; M.Div., Woodstock College; 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Philip J. King, Professor; A.B., St. John Semi- 
nary College; S.T.B., St. John Seminary School 
of Theology; S.T.L., Catholic University of 
America; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute; 
S.T.D., Pontifical Lateran University 

Matthew L. Lamb, Professor; B.A., 
Scholasticate of Holy Spirit Monastery; S.T.L., 
Pontifical Gregorian University; Dr.Theo., 
State University of Munster 

William W. Meissner, S.J., Professor; Univer- 
sity Professor of Psychoanalysis, B.A. (m.c.l.), 
M.A., St. Louis University; S.T.L., Woodstock 
College; M.D. (c.l.), Harvard University 

John Paris, S.J., Walsh Professor; B.S., M.A., 
Boston College; A.M., 1 larvard University; 
Ph.L., Weston College; M.A., Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Southern California 

Pheme Perkins, Professor; A.B., St. John's Col- 
lege; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Anthony Saldarini, Professor; A.B., A.M., Bos- 
ton College; Ph.L., Weston College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Francis A. Sullivan, S.J., Adjunct Professor; 
B. V, M.A., Boston College (Weston College); 
M.A., Fordham University; STL, Weston Col- 
lege; SID, Pontifical Gregorian University 



Mary Boys, S.N.J.M., Associate Professor; A.B., 

Fort Wright College; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity; Ed.D., Columbia University 

Francis X. Clooney, S.J., Associate Professor; 
A.B., Fordham University; M.Div., Weston 
School of Theology; Ph.D., University of Chi- 
cago 

Mary F. Daly, Associate Professor; A.B., College 
of St. Rose in Albany; A.M., Catholic Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., St. Mary's College; S.T.L., S.T.D., 
Ph.D., University of Fribourg 

J. Cheryl Exum, Associate Professor; A.B., Wake 
Forest University; A.M., M.Phil., Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia University 

Charles C. Hefling, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Harvard College, B.D., Th.D., The Divinity 
School Harvard University; Ph.D., Boston Col- 
lege 

Robert P. Imbelli, Associate Professor; Director 
of Institute of Religious Education and Pastoral 
Ministry; B.A., Fordham University; S.T.L., 
Gregorian University, Rome; M. Phil., Ph.D., 

Yale University 

Frederick Lawrence, Associate Professor; A.B., 
St. John's College; D.Th., University of Basel 

Claire Lowery, Adjunct Associate Professor; A.B., 
University of San Diego; M.Div., D.Min., 
Andover Newton Theological School 

H. John McDargh, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Emory University; Ph.D. Harvard University 

Louis P. Roy, O.P., Associate Professor; B.Ph., 
M.A.Ph., M.A.Th., Dominican College, Ot- 
tawa; Ph.D., University of Cambridge 

Margaret Amy Schatkin, Associate Professor; 
A.B., Queens College; A.M., Ph.D., Fordham 
University; Th.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary 

Francis P. Sullivan, S.J., Adjunct Associate Pro- 
fessor; A.B., A.M., S.T.L., Boston College; 
S.T.D., Institut Catholique de Paris 

Thomas E. Wangler, Associate Professor; B.S., 
LeMoyne College; M.A., Ph.D., Marquette 
University 

James M. Weiss, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Loyola University of Chicago; A.M., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 

John A. Darr, Assistant Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Wheaton College (Illinois); A.M., Ph.D., 
Vanderbilt University 

Pamela E.J. Jackson, Assistant Professor; A.B., 
M.Div, M.A., M.Phil, Ph.D., Yale University 

Stephen J. Pope, Assistant Professor; A.B, 
Gonzaga University; M.A, Ph.D., University 
of Chicago 

James Rurak, Adjunct Assistant Professor; A.B., 
Bates College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chi- 
cago 



Patrick J. Ryan, S.J, Assistant Professor; A.B, 
A.M., Boston College; A.M., Assumption Col- 
lege; S.T.L, Weston College; S.T.D, 
Gregorian University 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Theology is the academic discipline concerned 
with the realities affirmed by religious faith and 
with the traditions of belief and worship that in- 
form the life of communities of faith. Historical, 
biblical, psychological, ethical, pastoral, compara- 
tive, philosophical, and doctrinal studies are all 
included within the scope of Theology at Boston 
College. There is a strong, but by no means ex- 
clusive, emphasis on Christianity, and more spe- 
cifically on the Roman Catholic tradition. 

The courses offered by the Department are 
grouped into four categories: biblical; historical; 
ethical and social-scientific; and comparative and 
systematic or doctrinal. All courses, particularly 
those taught at the Core level, aim at fulfilling 
certain goals: 

1) a liberal arts goal of fostering awareness of 
the religious roots and background of our culture, 
for example, by giving students a coherent view 
of religion and its development, a groundwork for 
moral decision, and an awareness of their own 
existence as religious persons; 2) a specifically theo- 
logical goal of introducing the materials and meth- 
ods of one or more approaches to the academic 
study of religious faith and tradition; and 3) a re- 
ligious or confessional goaf explicit in some — though 
not all — courses, of exploring a particular tradi- 
tion "from the inside," healing negative encoun- 
ters with religion, inviting commitment and be- 
lief, and the like. 

Which of these goals are emphasized in a 
given course can often be determined from the 
descriptions which follow; but students are wel- 
come to consult with the professor concerned if 
clarification is needed. 

The Course Offerings 

The Department distinguishes five levels of 
course offerings: 1) Core-introductory, and de- 
signed for the fulfillment of the University's ba- 
sic Theology requirement; 2) Level OHe-introduc- 
tory, but not fulfilling the Core requirement; 3) 
Level Two-advanced undergraduate, more specifi- 
cally aimed at minors and majors; 4) Level Three- 
addressed to advanced undergraduates (usually 
majors) and graduate students who are more theo- 
logically professional; 5) Graduate-offered exclu- 
sively for professional and graduate academic 
theological formation. 

The Core Program 

The Core requirement in Theology, six credit 
hours, may be fulfilled by taking two three-credit 
courses at the Core level; by taking a two-semes- 
ter sequence of courses at the same level; or by 
taking one of the twelve-credit, full-year courses 
that fulfill the Core requirement in both Philoso- 
phy and Theology. 



College of Arts & Sciences • Theology • ill 



1 . Two three-credit courses. Students who select this 
option should choose one Core course with broad 
introductory aims (such as TH 050, TH 060, TH 
150, TH 151) and one Core course that concen- 
trates on a more specific topic or approach. 

2. Two-semester sequence. This option includes six- 
credit, full-year courses and courses which are 
taught over two semesters, but which may also be 
taken in the second semester alone, enrollment 
permitting, and joined to a course from option 1) 
to complete the theology requirement. 

3. Twelve-credit courses. There are two of these 
Philosophy/Theology courses: PL/TH 090-091, 
"Perspectives on Western Culture"; and PL/TH 
088-089, "Person and Social Responsibility" (for 
PULSE Program students only). 

The Major in Theology 

There are two tracks within the major: 

• Track I. The Study of Theology: This track is de- 
signed to enable the student to explore the Chris- 
tian tradition and the ways in which Christians 
have lived and thought and expressed their faith. 
The ordinary requirements for this track include 
ten courses, distributed as follows: 

1 . Five introductory (Core) courses, one each 
in Old Testament, New Testament, systematic/ 
doctrinal theology, ethics, and church history. 
The Perspectives Program, TH 090-091 (PL 
090-091) is recommended and fulfills two of these 
introductory requirements; 

2. Four electives (Levels I, II, or III), of which 
one is to be in biblical studies and one in system- 
atic/doctrinal theology; the other two should be 
chosen in consultation with the Majors' Director; 

3. The Majors' Seminar, designed to help 
majors synthesize their course work, identifies key 
themes and questions and areas in need of further 
study. This course is offered each fall, and may 
be taken by senior or junior majors; it is recom- 
mended that sufficiently-advanced students take 
the seminar in their junior year. 

• Track II: The Study of Religion: This track is de- 
signed to enable the interested student to explore 
the nature of religion and the variety of ways in 
which people have expressed and practiced their 
religious beliefs. Given the particular strengths of 
the department, this can be done most readily 
with reference to the Christian tradition, but stu- 
dents are urged to design a program which suits 
their specific questions and interests, drawing as 
well on the experiences and beliefs of other reli- 
gions. The ordinary requirements for this track 
include ten courses, distributed as follows: 

1. Two introductory (Core) courses: when 
possible, courses should be chosen which intro- 
duce the larger questions of the study of religion; 

2. TH 161, The Religious Quest I: Compara- 
tive Perspectives I; 

3. Three thematically- related electives (Lev- 
els I, II or III): in consultation with the Majors' 
Director, the student will identify a key theme — 
e.g., the philosophical basis of religion, the role 
of sacred texts in religion, religion and the arts, 
comparative religion, etc. — and take three courses 
(offered by the Theology or other departments) 
which focus on this theme. 



4. Three additional electives (Levels I, II or 
III), which support or amplify or usefully contrast 
with the other upper-level courses taken; 

5. The Majors' Seminar (as described in Track 
I above). 

Majors in both tracks are encouraged to work 
with other departments in cross-disciplinary 
study. Students in the School of Management and 
secondary-education majors in the School of 
Education can major also in Theology, and The- 
ology majors can concentrate in education in the 
School of Education. 

The Department's membership in the Boston 
Theological Institute allows advanced Theology 
majors to cross-register into some 700 courses 
taught by 1 50 faculty members at eight other BTI 
schools. Students thus have access to the resources 
of one of the world's great centers of theological 
study. 

The Minors in Theology 

The Minor in Biblical Studies 

This minor provides a special concentration in 
Bible for students who wish to gain knowledge of 
the biblical texts, of the world out of which the 
Bible came, and of the methods used in modern 
study of the Bible. For more information contact 
Prof. Anthony Saldarini, Theology Department, 
Carney417(x3880). 

The Minor in Church History 

This minor is designed to give students an over- 
view of the history of the Christian community, 
its life, thought, structure, and worship from its 
beginnings to the present day in introductory- 
level courses. In upper-level courses, the student 
can focus study on the development of the Church 
within a particular era or geographical setting. 
The minor is open to all students, but may be of 
special interest to those interested in history, lit- 
erature, theology, or philosophy. Professors for 
the minor are drawn from both the Theology and 
the History departments. 

For details of the requirements for the Church 
History minor, refer to the "Minors" section un- 
der the College of Arts and Sciences section of this 
Catalog. 

The Minor in Faith, Peace and Justice Studies 

Faith, Peace and Justice studies are part and par- 
cel of the mission of a Jesuit university "to help 
to prepare young people and adults to live and 
labor for others and with others to build a more 
just world." This concern for a peaceful world 
based on justice reflects the wider Christian and 
Catholic stance on the crucial issues of peace and 
justice. 

The interdisciplinary minor allows under- 
graduates to explore the pursuit of peaceful solu- 
tions to domestic, national and international con- 
flict. 

For details of the Faith, Peace and Justice 
Studies minor, refer to the "Minors" section un- 
der the College of Arts and Sciences section of this 
Catalog. 



The Lonergan Center 

Studies related to the work of the Jesuit theolo- 
gian and philosopher Bernard Lonergan (1904- 
1984) have a focus in the Lonergan Center at 
Boston College. Inaugurated in 1986, the Cen- 
ter houses a growing collection of Lonergan's 
published and unpublished writings as well as sec- 
ondary materials and reference works, and it also 
serves as a seminar and meeting room. The Cen- 
ter is on the fourth level of Bapst Library and is 
open during regular hours as posted. The direc- 
tor is Prof. Charles Hefling. 

The Joseph Gregory McCarthy Lecture 
Series 

The Joseph Gregory McCarthy Lecture Series, 
established by Dr. Eugene and Maureen 
McCarthy (and family) in the memory of their 
son, Joseph Gregory McCarthy, is held annually. 
The Joseph Gregory McCarthy Visiting Profes- 
sor offers a series of lectures and student and fac- 
ulty discussions about contemporary theological 
and religious issues during his or her visit to Bos- 
ton College. 

The 1992-1993 Joseph Gregory McCarthy 
Visiting Professor is Prof. Rene Girard. The 
1993-1994 Joseph Gregory McCarthy Visiting 
Professor is Prof. Leon Kass. Addition details 
aboutthe 1992-1993 and 1993-1994Joseph Gre- 
gory McCarthy Lecture Series can be obtained 
from the Department of Theology. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
Core-Biblical 

TH 005 Genesis: A Jewish Interpretation (F: 3) 

A detailed examination of the primary Bible book, 
as it has been understood by the people who 
authored and canonized it millennia ago, and have 
been busy interpreting it ever since. This course is 
funded in part by the Jewish Chautauqua Society. 

Albert Goldstein 

TH 009 Fundamentals of Judaism (F, S: 3) 

This course deals with Jewish Theology and the 
manner in which it is expressed in life. Personal, 
communal, calendaric and ritual aspects of Jew- 
ish living are presented and discussed. 

Samuel Chiel 
Mutray Rothman 

TH 021 Introduction to the Old Testament (F, S: 3) 

An introduction to the literature, religious ideas, 
and historical setting of the Hebrew Bible (Chris- 
tian Old Testament). Focus will be on major bib- 
lical concepts such as creation, election, and cov- 
enant, with some attention to their development 
within the prophetic and wisdom traditions. 

J. Cheryl Exu/n 

Philip King 

Maltha Morrison 

TH 050 Introduction to the New Testament (F, S: 3) 

This course introduces the student to the cultural, 
historical and religious milieu in which early 
Christianity emerged and developed during its 
first century. Each New Testament work is exam- 
ined in light of its situation in the Early Church 



112 • College of Arts & Sciences • Theology 



which led to its writing. The student is introduced 
to the methods used by modern biblical scholar- 
ship in understanding the "setting" of early Chris- 
tian literature. Graeco-Roman history, culture 
and religion are studied insofar as they are pre- 
supposed in Xew Testament writings. 

Mary Boys 

John Darr 

Ronald Marr 

Core-Comparative and Systematic or 
Doctrinal 

TH 060 Introduction to Christian Theology (F, S: 3) 

This course will begin with an analysis of religion, 
reason and faith, and the problem of God. Chris- 
tianity will be approached through a consideration 
of Jesus in the New Testament, the development 
of Christian beliefs, the Christian church and sac- 
raments. Readings will include both original 
sources from the Bible and theologians and intro- 
ductory books to aid the beginning student in 
reflection on the theological topics above. There 
are no prerequisites for this course. James Ayers 

Robert Bariy 

Rebecca Hetland Gould 

Alexander Lessard 

Rosemary Meland 

Joseph Nolan 

Daniel Patterson 

Cornelia Schuetz 

TH 072 Sacraments and Ministry (S: 3) 

The course will cover three principal areas: 1) The 
variety of forms of church order found in the New 
Testament and early Patristic writings. Conclu- 
sion: an actual plurality of forms for establishing 
the reality of sacraments and ministry in the ear- 
liest experience of the Christian community. 2) 
The necessity of preserving adherence to church 
order, particularly in the matter of sacraments and 
ministry, based on the requirement of visibility, 
so that the Church can carry out its mission as an 
historical community of faith. Conclusion: the 
discarding or derogation of legitimate church 
order leads to anti-ministry, anti-sacrament, anti- 
church attitudes. 3) Criteria for discerning the 
reality of sacraments and ministry in those com- 
munities separated from the traditional sources of 
order in the Church. The history of this discus- 
sion, especially in recent years, will be followed, 
with particular attention to the recent documents 
and strictures from the Congregation for the 
Doctrine of the Faith. Raymond G. Helmick, S.J. 

TH 080 God and Revelation (F, S: 3) 

The basic predicate of Christianity is that God has 
made Himself known to humankind in a way 
which we could never attain ourselves. This 
course will consider the possibility of I lis revela- 
tion, its form, its summit in Jesus Christ. It will 
then consider special questions such as revelation 
in the Church, Scripture and Tradition, and the 
nature of Theology. Patrick Ryan, S.J. 

TH 090-091 (PL 090-091) Perspectives on 
Western Culture I, II (F: 6-S: 6) 

This is a special two-semester, twelve-credit 
course that fulfills all the Core requirements in 
philosophy and theology. I he course will intro- 
duce the students into their philosophical and 
religious heritage through a study of the writings 
of the major thinkers who have formed our cul- 



tural traditions. The purpose of the course is to 
encourage students to discover the sources of 
those values that have formed their lives as well 
as to develop a critical and creative perspective 
toward themselves and their future. 

The Department 

TH 099 (BK 1 1 2) Introduction to Black Theology 
(F, S: 3) 

This introductory course promises to be an illu- 
minating journey into the alternative theological 
understanding of African-Americans. It will at- 
tempt to chart the social/historical development 
of theology in the context of the black commu- 
nity from pre-slavery to the present by examin- 
ing the theological expression therein. 

Andre Craddock- Willis 

TH 102 (BK 1 15) Contemporary Black Theology 

(S:3) 

This course intends to provide a glimpse across 
the panoramic landscape of recent and contem- 
porary Black Theology. It will survey the Black 
Theological activities and writings from the civil 
rights years to the present, concentrating on the 
academic debate within Black Theology. 

Students are required to commit themselves 
to understanding contemporary Black Theologi- 
cal expression, and supplement this theology with 
new ideas, inquiries and insights. 

Andre Craddock- Willis 

TH 107 (BK 120) Religion in Africa (F: 3) 

The course is designed to introduce the varieties 
of African religious experience. The content and 
significance of African religion as an autochth- 
onous religion will be outlined. Christianity and 
Islam as the extended religions to Africa will be 
discussed. While emphasis will be laid on the 
impact religion has had on African communities 
within the context of peace and justice in the 
world, the course will also consider the role of 
religion in changing Africa. Aloysius Lugira 

TH 108 (BK 121) Christianity in Africa (S: 3) 

This course is intended to give a historical bird's- 
eye-view of Christianity in Africa. While Chris- 
tianity in general will be touched on, emphasis will 
be laid on the development and the extension of 
the Catholic tradition in Africa. The three stages 
within which Christianity has so far been estab- 
lished in Africa will be discussed. Finally, a theo- 
logical outline of the response Christianity has 
received in Africa will be considered for the pur- 
pose of visualizing the future role of Christianity 
in changing Africa. Aloysius Lugira 

TH 1 53 Introduction to the World of Islamic 
Religion I (F: 3) 

This course will offer an introductory look at the 
birth of Islam; the principal tenets and texts of the 
faith; and the development of key doctrines and 
institutions. Sections of the course will focus on 
the pre-Islamic period; the life and experiences of 
the Prophet Mohammad; the QurUan and 
I ladith; the doctrines of both Shi'i and Sunni Is- 
lam; Islamic law and philosophy; and the rise of 
Suti thought and practices. Attention will also be 
paid to ritual and social practices among Muslims. 

Matthew S. Gordon 

TH 1 56 Introduction to the World of Islamic 
Religion II (S: 3) 

This course will cover developments in the Is- 
lamic world and religion from roughly the year 



1 300 CE to the present. Sections of the course will 
focus on later developments in Shi'i and Sunni 
doctrine; the spread by various means of the faith 
to many areas of the world; the development of 
legal and political institutions; the rise of local or 
regional forms of Islam; the encounters and con- 
flicts with the Christian/Western world; the rise 
of reform and revival movements; and the ques- 
tion of "fundamentalism." Much attention will be 
paid to the modern Islamic world and such issues 
as the status of women; the rise of Islam in the 
United States and Europe; and the convergence 
of Islamic political movements in the Middle East, 
North Africa and elsewhere. Matthew S. Gordon 

TH 161 The Religious Quest I: Comparative 
Perspectives (F: 3) 

The first semester of "The Religious Quest" will 
consider a series of key components of religious 
traditions-e.g., myths, ritual, imagery, saints, the 
role of community, the ideas of the divine, faith, 
theology, the place of spiritual disciplines-by a 
comparative method, according to which each 
topic will be treated in at least two different reli- 
gious traditions. The course will draw the Chris- 
tian tradition, and at least one other regarding 
each topic. Preliminary attention will be given to 
the variety of ways in which the terms "religion" 
and "religions" have been used. Except by special 
permission of the instructor, the first semester is 
a prerequisite for the second. H. John McDargh 

TH 162 The Religious Quest II: Special 
Questions (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: TH 161 The Religious Quest I or 
permission of the instructor. 

The Religious Quest II focuses upon particu- 
lar issues in the comparative study of religions and 
theologies. Each section will have a distinct ap- 
proach and content, according to the expertise of 
the professor: e.g., psychology and religion; femi- 
nist issues in religion; sacred texts of different tra- 
ditions; the development of theology "east and 
west." All sections will presuppose the back- 
ground of the first semester, and all will continue 
to be explicitly comparative drawing on the Chris- 
tian and at least one other tradition. 

H. John McDargh 

TH 1 85 Catholic Theology of Marriage (F, S: 3) 

This course will seek to examine the meaning of 
marriage in Catholic theology and to investigate 
the relevance of the theological data for contem- 
porary humanity in view of recent sociological and 
psychological factors. The nature of human love 
and special problems of sexual morality will be 
considered. Patrick J. Ryan, S.J. 

TH 190 Christians at Worship I (F: 3) 

The emergence of Christian patterns of worship 
from their roots in Judaism, through their devel- 
opment in the late Middle Ages. How early and 
medieval Christians baptized, celebrated the Eu- 
charist, developed ways of praying together, and 
a calendar of feasts, including attention to the 
Christian East. Discussion of how cultural and 
historical situations helped shape the Christian 
understanding of God, and how that understand- 
ing was expressed in worship. Pamela Jackson 

TH 191 Christians at Worship II (S: 3) 

Investigation of the forms of worship resulting 
from the Protestant and Catholic reformations; 
how older traditions of worship were adapted to 



College of Arts & Sciences • Theology • 1 13 



meet the needs of life in the U.S.; how the Litur- 
gical Movement has affected hoth Catholic and 
Protestant worship in the last two decades, espe- 
cially the reformed rites coming from Vatican II. 
The course will familiarize students with the li- 
turgical books of their worshipping community 
and consider the role of the laity in worship. 

Pamela Jackson 

TH 213 Foundations of Catholic Theology I (F: 3) 

Since Vatican II, how much, and in what specific 
ways has the understanding of the Catholic faith 
changed and/or remained the same? The overall 
Catholic heritage, as well as specific exegetical, 
dogmatic, historical, systematic, and ecumenical 
questions will be considered in the light of Vatican 
II. 

Topics to be discussed: Catholicism in Crisis; 
The Mystery of Existence (What does it all mean? 
What is life's meaning? Who am I? and the like); 
The Answer of World Religions; Israel as a Spe- 
cial Answer; Faith, Belief, and Theology; The 
Bible as God's Word in Human Words; The Life, 
Death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ as the 
Christian Answer; The God of Jesus; Sacraments; 
Special Questions. 

This course is best taken as a two-semester 
series with TH 214, but this is not an absolute re- 
quirement. Harvey D. Egan, S.J. 

TH 214 Foundations of Catholic Theology II (S: 3) 

Since Vatican II, how much, and in what specific 
ways has the understanding of the Catholic faith 
changed and/or remained the same? The overall 
Catholic heritage, as well as specific exegetical, 
dogmatic, historical, systematic, and ecumenical 
questions will be considered in the light of Vatican 
II. 

Specific topics are: Resurrection, Ascension, 
Pentecost, Charismatic Phenomena, Death, Pur- 
gatory, Hell, Demons, Possession, Superstition, 
Sin (Original and Personal), Heaven, the Church, 
Special Ecclesial Questions, Sacraments, 
Mariology, Ethics, Spirituality, Eschatology, a 
Synthesis. A brief introduction to the last half of 
the biblical books. 

Foundations of Catholic Theology I is suggested, 
but not required. Harvey D. Egan, S.J. 

TH 217-218 Catholicism I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

An introductory examination of the foundations 
of Catholic theology from an historical, doctri- 
nal and ecumenical perspective. The major 
themes throughout this two-semester course are: 
God, Scriptural Revelation, Jesus, the Church, 
Sacraments, and Christian Morality/Spirituality. 
Robert Braunreuther, S.J. 
Thomas H. Groome 

TH 221 Christian Imagination (F: 3) 

This is the story of religious imagination, particu- 
larly Christian. It's how great works of art come 
from great religious experiences, at different 
times, in different places. And those great works 
are able to keep revealing the religious experi- 
ences they embody. And they are able to relate to 
one another. The course will present religious art 
that reveals I) the creation of the world, 2) the fall 
of humans from grace, 3) the condition of humans 
apart from the divine, 4) the search for redemp- 
tion, 5) then visions of restoration. The course will 
start with the great imaginative system of 
Ogotemmeli Dogon/Africa, contemporary, then 



revert to the Egyptian, the Buddhist, the Hebrew, 
the Greek and Roman forms of religious imagi- 
nation. Then the course will take up Christian 
creativity and show how it wishes to communi- 
cate over time the original experience of the death 
and resurrection of Jesus for the sake of human- 
kind. It does this through the transformation of 
color, space, shape, motion, sound. There is the 
art of the catacombs, of the basilica, of the liturgy, 
of the icon, of chant. Contemporary religious 
experiences challenges the old art, and the expe- 
rience that art conveys. Then it creates a new art 
which, paradoxically, does not cancel the old, but 
prizes it in an unexpected way. Examples of mod- 
ern religious art will round out the course mate- 
rial and provide a new sense of how religious 
imagination works. Francis P. Sullivan, S.J. 

TH 231 Christian Mission (F: 3) 

A study of the decimation of the Indies by con- 
quering Spain from 1492 until roughly 1566. And 
a study of the rise of Christian conscience about 
it in Spain and in the Indies — the fashioning of 
Church doctrine (1537), and State policy (1542), 
about the just treatment of Indian peoples. The 
guide in this evaluation will be the work of Helen 
Rand Parish who has rediscovered the role of 
Bartolome de Las Casas (1484-1566) in the fash- 
ion of Church conscience and State policy dur- 
ing the conquest itself. The nature of Indian life 
in the New World will be seen through art slides, 
and Bartolome de las Casas' Histoiy of the Indies, 
the Life of Columbus section — written in 1552. The 
nature of the Conquest will be seen through Las 
Casas' Pro-Indian Tracts — written in 1542. The 
rise of conscience will be seen in Bartolome de las 
Casas' The Only Way to Draw All People to a Liv- 
ing Faith — written in 1534. From it came the 
Papal doctrine of 1537, and from the Pro-Indian 
Tracts came Spain's New Laws of 1542. The 
Christian conscience of Las Casas will be seen to 
also a model for the modern world. The transla- 
tions of Las Casas' works are by Francis P. Sulli- 
van, S.J. Francis P. Sullivan, S.J. 

TH 272 The Nature, Dignity and Destiny of the 
Human Person (F, S: 3) 

This course deals with the Theological Virtues, 
especially Faith; and with the Cardinal Virtues, 
especially Prudence, Justice, Temperance. 

Felix Talbot, SJ. 

TH 275 On Love and Friendship (S: 3) 

Lecture course to study the reality of human and 
divine friendship from the modern point of view 
as presented by Rousseau's Emile and de 
Tocqueville; from the ancient philosophical view- 
point as presented in Plato's Lysis; and then from 
the Christian perspective and presented in the 
New Testament and B. Lonergan's essay, "Final- 
ity, Love, Marriage." Frederick Lawrence 

TH 277 God and the Human Quest (S: 3) 

This course is an introduction to the philosophy 
and theology of God. Topics include the question 
of God, the question of God in human beings, 
human beings as the image of God, and an intro- 
duction to Trinitarian theology. Readings from 
Aristotle, Augustine, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, 
Eric Voegelin, Leo Strauss, and Bernard 
Lonergan. No prerequisites. Frederick Lawrence 



Core-Ethical and Social Scientific 

TH 074 Christian Social Ethics (F: 3) 

Basic introduction to Christian social ethics, with 
special emphasis given to issues of faith, peace, and 
justice. Both Protestant and Roman Catholic per- 
spectives will be considered. Fundamental theo- 
logical and moral matters will be considered in the 
context of particular issues and problems facing 
society today, such as social justice, war and peace, 
abortion, race and gender issues. Stephen Pope 

TH 074 Christian Social Ethics (S: 3) 

This course provides a basic introduction to 
Christian social ethics, with a particular empha- 
sis given to issues of faith, justice, and peace. Fun- 
damental theological and ethical questions will be 
considered in light of special issues facing society 
today, including social justice, race and gender 
issues, and war and peace. Virginia Ryan 

TH 088-089 (PL 088-089) Person and Social 
Responsibility (F: 6-S: 6) 

This is a two-semester, twelve-credit course that 
fulfills all the Core requirements in philosophy 
and theology. The course requirements include 
both ongoing involvement in one of the field 
projects available through the Pulse Program and 
participation in a correlated class. The course will 
focus on problems of social injustice and the pos- 
sibilities of surmounting those injustices. The 
field projects will put students directly in contact 
with people experiencing the consequences of one 
or another form of social injustice. The classes will 
attempt to take a deeper look into these, especially 
with regard to their origins in the lives of indi- 
viduals and society. Drawing on the works, both 
contemporary and traditional, of philosophical 
and religious figures, the classes will engage stu- 
dents in asking the basic moral questions "What 
is Justice?" "What is Happiness?" and "What kind 
of society do we live in?" Pulse only. 

The Department 

TH 1 60 (UN 1 60) The Challenge of Justice (F, S: 3) 

Core for those in the Faith, Peace and Justice 
Program. It is the purpose of this course to lay the 
groundwork for a basic understanding of the re- 
lationship that exists between justice and peace 
considered within the context of faith. Readings 
and discussion focusing upon the Catholic, Prot- 
estant, Jewish, Islamic and Secular Humanist tra- 
ditions will lead to a broader and more critical 
understanding of what is meant by "faith," "jus- 
tice," and "peace." The methodology of the 
course is as follows: lectures on the theory sur- 
rounding the three concepts; selected readings on 
the classical, medieval, modern, and contempo- 
rary understandings of the three concepts; a prac- 
tical project to be explored by each student as an 
attempt to apply the theory to contemporary chal- 
lenges to the concept of justice. Even though the 
course is a basic requirement for those who wish 
to become part of The Program for the Study of 
Faith, Peace and Justice, it is also open to students 
who have a serious interest in problems related to 
the formation of a just society. Those who com- 
plete this course will fulfill their Core require- 
ments in either philosophy or theology. 

Patrick Byrne 

Matthew Mullane 

James A. O'Donohoe 



114 • College of Arts & Sciences • Theoi oca 



TH 206 Relationships: A Way to Know God (S: 3) 

The search for intimacy is a major developmen- 
tal task of young adulthood, indeed of all of life. 
Intimacy is multi-faceted, and includes not only 
sexual attraction and expression, but the whole 
range of interpersonal relationships that serve to 
fulfill this deep longing of the human spirit. Inti- 
macy with God is mediated through other people. 
How do we experience the unseen God but 
through those whom we see and know? Human 
relationships have the potential to reveal God's 
presence in a dynamic and reassuring way. For 
Christians, Jesus is the manifestation of God in 
human experience. All life, in turn, is sacramen- 
tal; therefore, as Christians, we realize that all 
human encounters contain the possibility of im- 
aging God's relationship to us. 

A variety of relationships in life will be exam- 
ined in order to explore our own religious and 
psycho-sexual development. Of special concern 
will be seeing our search for intimacy as deeply 
connected to our seeking after God. Among the 
relationships to be explored will be friendship, 
love, marriage, parent and child, and communal 
settings of which we may be part. The course will 
attempt to address the communal nature of the 
Christian life and the incarnational character of 
religious belief and practice. 

Readings from theology and psychology and 
works of fiction will be included. The approach 
will be integrative of human experience with theo- 
retical materials in the course. Evaluations will be 
based upon critical thinking, discussing and writ- 
ing. Joseph Marchese 

TH 252 Identity And Commitment: A Theology 
for Shaping a Life (F: 3) 

This will be a theological attempt to grapple with 
issues of identity and commitment in response to 
the upwardly-mobile track so many of our gradu- 
ates and students aspire to and are influenced by. 
The continuing formation of identity in early 
adulthood and the consolidation of this awareness 
will be explored in deciding to whom and to what 
I will commit myself. Topics of power, service, 
sexuality, career, lifestyle, success, intimacy and 
death, etc. will be considered as fundamental to 
the field of human vocation. Questions of how we 
deal with these issues in our lives will be consid- 
ered as pivotal in forming a mature Christian way 
of life. The assumption underlying the course is 
that every Christian has a vocation, although not 
necessarily ordained or a member of an official 
religious community of women or men. The vo- 
cation arises from a Christian's baptism and the 
call of the sacrament to be ministers of the gos- 
pel — a priestly people. This vocation is more than 
an occupation or a profession. Commitments will 
be examined as ways of living out one's vocation. 
The skills and opportunities for professional life 
and work life will be seen in light of the "call" in 
baptism. Joseph Marchese 

TH 280 Conflict Management: Principles and 
Methods (F: 3) 

The course will concentrate on the obstacles to 
negotiated settlement of communal and interna- 
tional conflicts, the dynamic of distrust, anxiety, 
scapegoating, apathy and violence as responses to 
the issues of conflict, and how to bring the par- 
ticipants in a conflict to the point of engaging in 
negotiation. Techniques of negotiation will be 



dealt with as well, but with emphasis on the ob- 
stacles that have to be overcome before the par- 
ties are prepared to enter negotiations. The prin- 
ciples treated have application to other levels of 
conflict, besides these communal and interna- 
tional ones, such as family and marital conflict, 
community relations, and labor-management dis- 
putes. This application and the origin of many of 
the techniques of conflict management in these 
fields will be treated, but the instructor's experi- 
ence is primarily with the communal and inter- 
national conflicts, and this will be reflected in the 
course. Raymond G. Helmick, S.J. 

TH 284 An Introduction to Catholic Theological 
Ethics: Part I (F: 3) 

It is the purpose of this course to provide the col- 
lege student with an overview of the elements 
essential for a basic understanding of Christian 
morality as it is articulated in the Roman Catho- 
lic tradition. Its basic content: the nature of 
Catholic theological ethics; the moral agent in 
Catholic theology; the nature and function of 
moral norms; the role of personal conscience; 
some reflections on sin and virtue. This course is 
continued in the spring with TH 294. 

James A. O'Donohoe 

TH 287 Christian Tradition and Moral Problems 

I (F: 3) 

This is the first half of a two-course sequence. It 
aims for a basic understanding of Christian the- 
ology and ethics, particularly the relation of Scrip- 
ture, Church teaching, and the philosophy of 
human nature and morals ("natural law"). Read- 
ings will include selections from the Bible, Augus- 
tine, Aquinas, Luther, and contemporary authors. 
The first semester will concentrate on moral 
problems concerning sexuality, marriage, gender 
roles and medical ethics. The second semester will 
move to social ethics (TH 288). Lisa S. Cahill 

TH 288 Christian Tradition and Moral Problems 

II (S: 3) 

Continuation of TH 287 (prerequisite). Study of 
contemporary social ethics, as grounded in the 
Christian tradition (Bible, Augustine, Aquinas, 
Luther, Calvin). Possible topics: war and peace, 
economic ethics, liberation ethics, interracial and 
intercultural ethics. Lisa S. Cahill 

TH 294 An Introduction to Catholic Theological 
Ethics: Part II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: TH 284 or the equivalent. 
In light of the material covered in TH 284, Part 
I, a variety of relevant moral issues will be ex- 
plored: sexual ethics, health care ethics, war, capi- 
tal punishment, issues of justice and right, abor- 
tion, contraception, etc. James A. O'Donohoe 

TH 295 Christian Ethics for Health Care 
Professionals (F, S: 3) 

This course is designed in a special way for those 
interested in pursuing careers in the field of health 
care. It is introductory in nature, and will attempt 
to present ethical theory as it has been developed 
within the context of the Judaeo-Christian tradi- 
tion. It is also practical in nature. Ethical theory 
will be complemented by the case studies of some 
o) the basic problems which contemporary soci- 
ety occasions for health care professionals. Those 
who complete the requirements of this course will 
satisfy one of their Core requirements in theol- 
ogy. Preference is given to Nursing and Pre-Med 



students; the course is open to other students (on 
a space-available basis) by permission of instruc- 
tor only. Raymond Devettere 

James A. O'Donohoe 

TH 298 Law, Medicine and Ethics (S: 3) 

This course is offered for pre-med, pre-law, pre- 
dental, and other allied health profession students 
and is designed for sophomores, juniors, and se- 
niors. 

A study of the legal and moral aspects of se- 
lected issues in medicine: informed consent, ster- 
ilization, organ donation, compulsory medication, 
allocation of scarce resources, death and dying, 
national health insurance options, etc. The sub- 
ject matter will be taken primarily from actual 
court opinions. The analysis will draw on medi- 
cal, theological, and ethical materials. Enrollment 
is limited to 30 students. John J. Paris, S.J. 

Core-Historical 

TH 1 16 Evangelism in the Early Church (F: 3) 

The mission of the church in antiquity, i.e., the 
rise and diffusion of Christianity in the Roman 
empire to A.D. 500. The evangelization of the 
Roman empire, one of the turning points of his- 
tory, is a subject of permanent and universal in- 
terest. We are transported to an ancient battle- 
field, but the cause is our own. The confrontation 
between Christianity and paganism was a vital 
one, touching the origin, essence, authority, and 
power of the gospel. This subject will be investi- 
gated on a theological and historical plane. 

Margaret A. Schatkin 

TH 1 64 Religion and Culture: The American 
Experience (F, S: 3) 

This course will begin with an attempt to define 
religion as a form of human behavior, and then 
trace the varieties of such behavior in the histo- 
ries of the major religious denominations of the 
United States as well as in an American civil reli- 
gion. Thomas W angler 

Level One-Historical 

TH 333 A History of the Jesuits (S: 3) 

A close scrutiny of the thought and activities of 
the most controversial order in the Catholic 
Church from its founding by Ignatius of Loyola 
until the suppression of 1773 and the restoration 
leading to contemporary times. John Willis, S.J. 

Level One-Ethical and Social Scientific 

TH 302 Introduction to Feminist Ethics I (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or 
equivalent. 

The course constitutes an introduction to the 
themes studied in Feminist Ethics I and II. It ex- 
amines the interconnected atrocities perpetrated 
against women and nature in patriarchal society 
and analyzes ethical problems confronting women 
under the prevailing conditions of oppression. 

Mary Daly 

TH 304 Introduction to Feminist Ethics II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or 
equivalent. 

This course offers further material in the area 
of Introduction to Feminist Ethics. We will con- 
sider fundamental problems arising from the pre- 
vailing patriarchal myths and symbols, and the 
consequent reduction of women and nature to the 



College of Arts & Sciences • Theology • us 



status of objects. May be taken separately from 
TH 302. Mary Daly 

TH 318 Religion and Politics (S: 3) 

An exploration of the role of religion and the 
churches in American public life. Historical, le- 
gal, ethical, and theological dimensions of the 
relationship will be treated, in order to clarify 
contemporary debates. Attention will be given the 
controversies of recent political events and the 
role of religion in them. David Hollenbach, S.J. 

TH 323 Northern Ireland Conflict (F: 3) 

The course will study the psychological dynamic 
of the communal conflict, its economic, social and 
political bases in history and in contemporary 
consciousness. Topics will include the security 
problems, political options, legal systems, pros- 
pects of economic recovery, communal percep- 
tions within Northern Ireland, governmental and 
public opinion perceptions in Britain and in the 
Republic of Ireland. Comparison will be made 
with other conflicts. Raymond G. Helmick, S.J. 

TH 325 Lebanon: Focal Point of a Crisis (S: 3) 

This course examines the still-unfolding conflict 
in Lebanon, the balance of confessional and so- 
cial forces, the breakdowns of 1958, 1975-76, and 
the continuing crisis since. Distinction will be 
made between such conflict factors as are inter- 
nal to Lebanon and those that are imposed by 
external forces; what is reality and what is para- 
noia. The Lebanese conflict will be located within 
the broader crisis of the Middle East. The 
strengths and weaknesses of the traditional Leba- 
nese pluralism will be discussed, and elements 
sought which can produce healing in Lebanon 
and service to the region. 

Raymond G. Helmick, S.J. 

TH 327 (PL 259) (SC 250) Perspectives on War, 
Aggression, and Conflict Resolution I (F: 3) 

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of 
various alternatives to war, evaluated on the ba- 
sis of both practical and ethical criteria. Topics 
include ethics of war and conflict, mutual deter- 
rence, arms control and disarmament, economic 
conversion, world government, regionalism, and 
nonviolent resistance. Rein A. Uritam 

TH 328 (PL 269) (SC 251 ) Perspectives on War, 
Aggression, and Conflict Resolution II (S: 3) 

An interdisciplinary course that is concerned pri- 
marily with alternatives and solutions to the prob- 
lem of war, including those advanced in the past 
and present, but also ones that may be required 
to meet the needs of the changing world of the 
future. Rein A. Uritam 

TH 339 Living Justly in American Society (S: 3) 

A course designed for students in the Faith, Peace, 
and Justice Program, but open to all. Limited to 
25 students. 

For the past century, America has been at the 
forefront of global change: technological, eco- 
nomic, political, and cultural. At the same time, 
our own society has been revolutionized: from 
women's suffrage to the civil rights movement; 
from the horse-drawn carriage to rocket propul- 
sion; from the pony express to FAX; from natu- 
ral to synthetic products. Our technological and 
economic power has been a blessing and a curse. 
At the same time we have fought back many con- 
tagious diseases, we have created new diseases or 



exacerbated others by environmental pollution. 
Countless innovations have stressed the capacity 
of our traditions to give order to our lives. In other 
cases, the traditions themselves have been called 
into question. What it means to live justly is a 
question often lost in confusion or is seemingly 
too difficult to answer. 

In principle, living justly entails being virtu- 
ous and doing right. But when change is so rapid 
and extensive, virtues, rules, and the need to de- 
cide may seem to be at odds. This course will ex- 
plore the issues that stress our traditional values, 
entertain options available to our society and to 
us as individuals and then ask, "how and in what 
ways does Christian faith shed light on what it 
means to be virtuous and what constitutes right 
action?" James Rurak 

TH 405 Ecological and Christian Ethics (F: 3) 

Long before the ecological crisis, Ludwig 
Feuerbach declared that "Nature, the world, has 
no value, no interest for Christians. The Chris- 
tian thinks of himself and the salvation of his 
soul." Recently, historian Lynn White charged 
that the Christian tendency to separate nature and 
history is at the roots of the rape of nature. Is 
Christianity concerned only with personal and/ 
or political redemption? Are the ethics of caring 
for the earth antithetical to Christian ethics? Or, 
are Christians impelled to respond to and con- 
ceive of a redemptive love meant not only for 
humans but all creation? This course raises these 
questions by historical study of the ecological cri- 
sis and by comparing secular and Christian inter- 
pretations of it and responses to it. James Rurak 

TH 406 Theology of Peace (S: 3) 

Despite the cold comfort of a Cold War lost or 
won, the nuclear age continues to harbor the pos- 
sibility (or even probability) of futurelessness and 
raises serious questions about humanity, and 
about our relationship to God. Is it possible to 
believe in the loving presence and security of God 
in the face of the deep pathology of the arms race 
and the proliferation of atomic, biological and 
chemical weapons? In our age of modern warfare, 
can we meaningfully talk about a compassionate 
God in the midst of so much carnage and suffer- 
ing and within earshot of the victims themselves? 
The purpose of the course is to focus on such 
questions as we examine the Christian tradition's 
response to war and peace. The American Catho- 
lic Bishops challenge us "to develop a theology of 
peace." In response to that challenge, we will at- 
tempt to articulate what it means to be a person 
(or community) of faith within our nuclear cul- 
tural framework. The poet says peacemaking is 
hard — hard almost as war, and it is the conviction 
of this course that peacemaking is much harder if 
we go about that task in ignorance of the resources 
of the Christian religious and theological tradi- 
tion. Matthew Mullane 

TH 410 (UN 500) Capstone: One Life, Many 
Lives (F, S: 3) 

See course listing under UN 500. James Weiss 

TH 41 1 (UN 501 ) Capstone: Patterns of 
Development and Narratives of Faith (F: 3) 

See course listing under LTN 501. 

H. John McDargh 



TH 412 (UN 507) Capstone: Personal 
Commitment: The Key to Maturity (S: 3) 

See course listing under LTN 507. 

James A. O'Donohoe 

TH 413 (UN 511) Capstone: Lives in Progress 
(F, S: 3) 

See course listing under UN 511. 

Joseph Marchese 

UN 590 Faith, Peace and Justice Senior Project 
Seminar (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of the 
Program for the Study of Faith, Peace and Jus- 
tice. 

This course provides the "finishing touch" lor 
students in the program for the Study of Faith, 
Peace and Justice. 

Students enrolled in the seminar work closely 
with a faculty project advisor from the department 
of their major, and present preliminary results of 
their project study in the seminar. Student and 
faculty responses to the presentation will help 
shape the presenter's project into a finalized form. 
The seminar provides a unique opportunity for 
the individual student to integrate several years 
of study in the Program, while at the same time 
learning about an interesting range of issues from 
fellow students. Stephen Pope 

James Rurak 

Level Two-Majors (and Other Advanced 
Students) 

TH 330 Majors' Seminar (F: 3) 

The Majors' Seminar is designed to help majors 
synthesize their coursework, identifying key 
themes, questions and areas in need of further 
study. This course is offered each fall, and may 
be taken by senior or junior majors; it is recom- 
mended that sufficiently-advanced students take 
the seminar in junior year. Majors only. 

Stephen Pope 

Level Three-Biblical 

TH 350 Gospel of Matthew (F: 3) 

A detailed study of Matthew as a literary and theo- 
logical work with special attention to its setting 
in first century Judaism and Christianity and its 
relationship to the other gospels. Matthew's im- 
plications for Christian thought and behavior will 
be stressed. An introductory course in Biblical 
studies is presumed. Anthony J. Saldarini 

TH 356 The Book of Psalms (F: 3) 

This course deals with the Psalms and their mean- 
ing for today. In the process, samples of psalms 
from the various categories will be analyzed in 
terms of structure and theology. Literary quali- 
ties will also be considered. Philip J. King 

TH 357 Pauline Tradition (F: 3) 

An introduction to Paul's letters, this course sur- 
veys the major theological themes in the letters 
and the socio-religious setting of the Pauline 
churches. The second half of the semester is de- 
voted to a close reading of 1 Corinthians with 
emphasis upon historical studies of ancient 
Corinth, rhetorical analysis of the text and the 
social dynamics of an early Christian community. 

Pheme Perkins 

TH 359 Gospel of Mark (S: 3) 

This course provides an exegesis of the Gospel of 
Mark for students needing an introduction to 



116 • College of Arts & Sciences • Theology 



modern biblical interpretation. Study of the lit- 
erary composition of Mark will be combined with 
discussion of religious issues raised in the gospel 
narrative such as the picture of Jesus as powerful 
healer and suffering Son of God, discipleship as 
service, and Jesus' challenge to established tradi- 
tion. Pheme Perkins 

TH 378 Jesus in Story and History (F: 3) 

A literary and historical study of Jesus of 
Nazareth. An extensive literary-critical analysis of 
the diverse portrayals of Jesus in the canonical 
Gospels will be followed by an examination of 
modern historical-critical attempts to reconstruct 
the historical Jesus behind literary/theological 
accounts. John A. Dan- 

Level Three-Comparative and 
Systematic or Doctrinal 

TH 392 Christian Initiation: Baptism (F: 3) 

The evolution of the ritual structure of Christian 
initiation including conversion, catechumenate, 
and the rites of baptism/confirmation, from New 
Testament evidence to contemporary practice. 
Analysis of the ritual structure of the RCIA and 
its theological ramifications. Pamela Jackson 

TH 393 Christian Initiation: Eucharist (S: 3) 

The emergence of Eucharistic patterns of worship 
from early Christian liturgies to the reforms of 
Vatican II. Structural analysis of, for example, 
Jewish meal prayers, New Testament evidence, 
Didache, Apostolic Tradition, Apostolic Constitutions 
and other fourth-century sources, the Liturgy of 
St. John Chrysostom, Roman sacramentaries and 
ordines, the reformed Eucharistic rites of Prot- 
estant and Catholic Reformations and Vatican II. 
The analysis will be based on primary source 
materials in translation. Pamela Jackson 

TH 445 Faith and Reason in the Middle Ages (F: 3) 

This seminar studies the relationship between 
faith and reason in the medieval context as defined 
by the work of St. Thomas Aquinas. First a sys- 
tematic overview of how he understands the re- 
lationship of faith and reason will be presented. 
This systematic presentation will then be illus- 
trated in reading his commentary on the Gospel 
of St. John. Finally, the debates concerning divine 
eternity and the eternity of the world will provide 
a context for understanding how the synthesis of 
faith and reason in Aquinas began to dissolve, 
setting the stage for subsequent developments and 
eventually the conflicts between reason and faith. 

Matthew L. Lamb 

TH 498 Theology of Christian Mysticism (S: 3) 

I his course focuses upon the essence of Chris- 
tian mysticism as a way of life involving the 
person's purification by, illumination by, and 
eventual union with the God of love by examin- 
ing Old Testament and New Testament mysti- 
cism as well as the mysticism and/or mystical the- 
ology of 55 figures in the ( christian tradition from 
Origen to Karl Rahner. Harvey D. Egan, S.J. 

TH 503 On the Incarnation (S: 3) 

This course aims at a systematic understanding of 
the person of Christ — who he was and is — in light 
of doctrinal development and contemporary 
exigences. It will raise the question of the Incar- 
nation in light of soteriology, and thus to some 
extent presupposes TH 511, "On the Redemp- 
tion," but may be taken separately. Previous work 



in New Testament is expected, and courses on any 
of the following will be helpful: the Trinity, grace, 
Christology, political theology. 

Charles C. Hefiing, Jr. 

TH 510 On the Trinity (S: 3) 

An introduction for those who have wondered 
about God as Three in One: a schematic outline, 
in lecture format, of the historical development 
of the trinitarian doctrine with discussion of a 
possibly relevant systematic understanding of it 
(the psychological analogy). Required readings 
from J.N.D. Kelly, Early Christian Creeds; B. 
Lonergan, Verbum, Word and Idea in Aquinas; K. 
Rahner, The Trinity. Frederick Lawrence 

TH 51 1 On the Redemption (F: 3) 

This course aims at a systematic understanding of 
redemption — a soteriology — in light of doctrinal 
development and contemporary exigences. It con- 
centrates on the interrelation of the work and the 
person of Christ and thus complements TH 503, 
"On the Incarnation," but may be taken sepa- 
rately. Previous courses on any of the following 
will be helpful; the Trinity, grace, Christology, 
political theology. Charles C. Hefiing, Jr. 

TH 516 Fundamental Theology (S: 3) 

The foundations and principles of the theologi- 
cal sciences: Revelation, God, the world, man and 
woman. Scripture (the canon, inspiration and in- 
errancy, biblical hermeneutics) and its relation- 
ship to tradition. Belief. Authority. Church. 

The course will include or allow for the study 
of such issues as: the crisis in the language of faith; 
the "God is Dead" theology; secularization the- 
ology; the historical Jesus problem; theology and 
method; the academic, historical and cultural pre- 
suppositions and conditions of theology; the Bible 
and theology; the Bible and ethics, historicity, 
historical consciousness and theology; doctrinal 
development; theology and the world; theology 
and the social sciences; theology, the theologian 
and the Church; the nature of religious author- 
ity; the problems of belief in the modern world, 
etc. Robert J. Daly, S.J. 

TH 525 Medieval Theology I (F: 3) 

A study of the Biblical, patristic, and philosophi- 
cal sources of medieval theology and an examina- 
tion of the argumentation in medieval sources for 
the development of theology as a university dis- 
cipline. Stephen F. Brown 

TH 542 Buddhist Systems of Meditation and 
Philosophy (F:3) 

An exploration of the synergistic relationship 
between meditational practices and philosophical 
theories in several distinct Buddhist traditions of 
India, Tibet and China (e.g., Theravada, 
Madhyamika, Tibetan dGe lugs and bKa' rgyud, 
Chinese Ch'an, and Pure Land), based on read- 
ings of primary sources in translation. No back- 
ground in Buddhist studies required. Students 
will be encouraged to raise comparative issues, 
particularly concerning the relationship between 
Christian doctrines and contemplative practices. 

John Makransky 

TH 543 Evaluation and Interpretation of 
Documents of the Magisterium (F: 3) 

It is a distinctive aspect of Catholic theology that 
it attributes an authoritative role to the teaching 
of the Magisterium. This course will treat the prin- 



ciples to be applied in evaluating and interpret- 
ing the documents issued by the various organs 
of the Magisterium. Francis A. Sullivan, S.J. 

TH 544 The Development of Christian Thought 
on Salvation Outside the Church (S: 3) 

This course will treat the history of Christian 
thought about salvation "outside the church" with 
a view to understanding the factors that have in- 
fluenced the development from the negative pro- 
nouncements of earlier ages to the optimism char- 
acteristic of modern Catholic thought on this is- 
sue. Francis A. Sullivan, S.J. 

TH 545 The Spiritual Disciplines of Buddhists in 
Asia (S:3) 

A study of several spiritual disciplines through 
which Buddhists in Asia have sought salvific wis- 
dom, compassion and inspiration, with particu- 
lar emphasis on Mahayana traditions: e.g., ethi- 
cal disciplines, meditations on compassion, devo- 
tional practices, rituals, pilgrimage, soteriological 
experiences and processes. No background in 
Buddhist studies required. Students will be en- 
couraged to raise comparative issues, particularly 
concerning the spiritual disciplines of Christian- 
ity. John Makransky 

Level Three-Ethical and Social Scientific 

TH 408 Christian Ethics and History (S: 3) 

This course provides an analysis of the emergence 
and development of the notion of historical con- 
sciousness or the so-called "historical approach" 
to the study of human life and thought. The rise 
of historical theology and its different expressions 
from the end of the nineteenth century to the 
present. This course is also of interest to students 
in Political Science. Ernest Fortin, A.A. 

TH 540 Life of a Mystic: St. Ignatius (F: 3) 

This course presents a series of lectures on the life 
and personality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, mystic 
and founder of the Jesuits, as a basis for consid- 
ering the relationship between his intense spiri- 
tuality and mystical experiences and psychody- 
namic factors. Lectures will be followed by dis- 
cussion. Objective is to consider aspects of the 
psychology of mystical experience in the life con- 
text of a great mystic. William W. Meissner, S.J. 

TH 541 Cultic Process and the Origin of 
Christianity (S: 3) 

This course deals with the nature of the cultic 
process and its role in understanding the emer- 
gence and early development of Christianity. 
Historical and cultural aspects are treated in re- 
lation to psychological factors and dynamics. 
Lectures accompanied by readings and discussion. 
William W. Meissner, S.J. 

TH 553 Feminist Ethics I (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or 
equivalent. 

Analysis of the emerging feminist ethos as dis- 
tinct from "feminine" morality defined by sexu- 
ally hierarchical society. Examination of the un- 
holy trinity: rape, genocide, war. Special attention 
will be given to the problem of overcoming the 
unholy sacrifice of women through individual and 
participatory self-actualization. The course will 
explore the problem of redefining "power" and 
"politics" through the process of living "on the 
boundary" of patriarchal institutions. Mary Daly 



College of Arts & Sciences • University Courses • 1 17 



TH 554 Feminist Ethics II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or 
equivalent. 

The course will reflect upon and be part of the 
process of transvaluating values in the women's 
consciousness and action. We will explore the 
problem of breaking old habits ("virtues" and 
"vices") instilled through patriarchal teachings 
and practices. We will consider specific manifes- 
tations of sexual politics in religion, language, 
education, the media, medicine, and law. May be 
taken separately from TH 553. Mary Daly 

TH 561 Christian Ethics and Social Issues (S: 3) 

Methods and sources for Christian ethical analy- 
sis, decision making, and policy formation in the 
areas of religious liberty, economic justice, human 
rights, and war and peace; the role of Christians 
and the ministry of the church in the political 
sphere. David Hollenbach, S.J. 

TH 565 Mythical Patterns of Patriarchy I (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or 
equivalent. 

Analysis of patriarchal religious myths and 
symbols which overtly and subliminally affect 
belief and behavior in society. We will consider 
the social constructions of reality that are engen- 
dered and legitimized by such myths and symbols. 
The course will include an analysis of secular in- 
carnations of patriarchal religious myth, especially 
in the professions and in the manifestations of 
phallotechnology. Mary Daly 

TH 566 Mythical Patterns of Patriarchy II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or 
equivalent. 

A study of mythic Goddess-murder (e.g., the 
Babylonian creation myth) and societal reenact- 
ments of such myths in the ritual atrocities in 
modern technocracy as well as in pretechnological 
societies. We will focus on the mythic and theo- 



logical archetypes and other "sacred canopies" of 
legitimation which have justified such atrocities 
as Indian suttee, Chinese footbinding, African 
initiation rites, European witchburning, abuses in 
modern medicine, animal experimentation, and 
the rape of the planet through nuclear and chemi- 
cal contamination. May be taken separately from 
TH 565. Mary Daly 

TH 567 Christian Perspectives on Bioethics (S: 3) 

The relation between Christian theology and 
moral analysis will be investigated via biomedical 
dilemmas. Possible topics include abortion, eu- 
thanasia, definitions of death, seriously abnormal 
newborns, genetic counseling, reproductive tech- 
nologies, distribution of health care resources. 
Books by major Christian theologians will be se- 
lected, e.g., Richard McCormick, Paul Ramsey, 
and Daniel Callahan (philosopher). Lisa Cabill 

TH 580 Natural Law (F: 3) 

An analysis of the origin and various forms of the 
Christian natural law doctrine. Emphasis on early 
Christian and medieval authors. Natural law and 
history. The contemporary critique of natural law. 
This course is also of interest to students in Po- 
litical Science. Ernest L. Fortin, A.A. 

TH 589 Rebirth of Utopia (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: One course each in Theology, Phi- 
losophy, and Political Science. 

Analysis of the imaginary aspects of Utopian 
texts and integration of the imaginary with social 
criticism. Two Utopian texts in each of the con- 
stitutive dimensions of society (family, education/ 
culture, economics, politics) describe fundamen- 
tal social options. The relationship between the 
imagination, and the options it uncovers, becomes 
a platform on which to discuss the relation of the- 
ology to ethics, and of theory to practice. 

James Rurak 



Level Three-Historical 

TH 425 (CL 323) Seminar in Greek Patrology 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: Greek 

A critical and philological examination, in the 
original, of a genre, author, problem, or period 
in the history of Greek patristic literature. This 
semester will be devoted to the study of John 
Chrysostom. Margaret A. Schatkin 

TH 442 Religion in the United States (F: 3) 

An historical survey of the religious, theological 
and institutional developments of the major 
Christian and Jewish and civil religious traditions 
in the United States. Thomas Wangler 

TH 443 Faith of American Catholics (S: 3) 

This course will treat the various ways in which 
Catholics have believed the Catholic faith in the 
United States, by examining catechisms, hymnals, 
liturgical and devotional literature, church archi- 
tecture and decoration, and so on. A major inter- 
est of the course will be the ways in which Catho- 
lics dealt with symbols of the nation and civil re- 
ligion. Thomas Wangler 

TH 444 (HS 401 ) Reformation (S: 3) 

See course description under HS 401. 

Virginia Reinburg 



University Courses 



UNIVERSITY CAPSTONE COURSES 

For a full description of the interdisciplinary 
Capstone Program, designed for seniors and sec- 
ond-semester juniors in all schools, refer to the 
"University" section at the front of this Catalog. 
Below are descriptions of the Capstone courses 
offered in 1992-93. 

All Capstone courses may be taken as elec- 
tives. Capstone seminars which are cross-listed in 
a specific department may also be taken for ma- 
jor credit in that department. 

UN 500 (TH 410) One Life, Many Lives (F, S: 3) 

We often feel that we are living separate lives in 
our work, our relationships, our leisure, and our 
spiritual growth. But we are repeatedly challenged 
to make one life from our many lives: to integrate 
our vision, to decide what is most important. We 
always arrive at the question: how do my "lives" 
fit together as one life? Do my activities reflect my 
deepest needs and values? 

In this course, we shall read biography and au- 
tobiography to observe the process of finding the 



central meaning of a life, because the writer of 
biography must assess the lifelong process of 
forming, keeping, or breaking significant commit- 
ments. We shall read a novel and articles dealing 
with conflicts of career and relationships. We shall 
also keep a personal journal to learn the process 
of reflection, growth, and integration. 

James Weiss 

UN 501 (TH 41 1) Patterns of Development and 
Narratives of Faith (F: 3) 

Our lives take shape and meaning from the sto- 
ries which we tell ourselves about what it means 
to be a man or a woman, what is worth doing in a 
life, and who or what is ultimately valuable and 
trustworthy. In this course, we shall investigate 
our own life narratives by looking at the signifi- 
cant myths that derive from religion, culture, and 
our families. We shall read in developmental psy- 
chology, cultural anthropology, and narrative 
theology. We shall also use selected fiction and 
film. John McDargh 



UN 502 (PL 434) Ethics in the Professions (F: 3) 

The study of ethics is indispensable because moral 
dilemmas are so ubiquitous. Moreover, the man- 
ner in which each of us chooses to deal with such 
issues in our lives determines our collective char- 
acter as a society. This course will help students 
deal with the different types of dilemmas which 
they will soon encounter in their professional 
careers and personal lives. For example, are lying 
or deception ever justified? What are the limits 
of confidentiality and secrecy? What constitutes 
an invasion of privacy? Is preferential hiring mor- 
ally acceptable? We will consider these and other 
controversial issues as they arise in personal life 
and in professions such as law, journalism, medi- 
cine, and business. Several videos from the PBS 
series "Ethics in America" will be the basis for 
class discussion. Richard Spinello 

UN 503 (PL 273) Private Life, Public Life (F: 3) 

We shall explore the ways you can draw upon the 
resources of your previous studies in order to 
make sense of and enrich the challenges awaiting 



118 • Coulege of Arts &. Scien< es • University Courses 



you in your future private life and public life. In 
particular, we shall look at the ways in which lit- 
erature, history, social science, philosophy, and 
theology can deepen your personal relationships, 
your work life, your role as a citizen of a nation 
and a world, and your spiritual life. 

Patrick Byrne 

UN 504 Building a Future: Cultural Attitudes, 
Place, and Gender (S: 3) 

Discussions will be based on biographical mate- 
rial dealing with the lives and careers of modern 
scientists, both real and fictional, as viewed by 
themselves or their biographers, and by their 
spouses, women/men friends, or women/men 
colleagues. Emphasis will be on how their adult 
lives were constructed, what factors influenced 
their choices, what motivated them, what role 
colleagues and relatives of the opposite gender 
played. How did it all work out in the end? 

George Goldsmith 

UN 505 Life and Career Planning (F: 3) 

This course provides an overview of life and ca- 
reer planning in the context of 1) career, 2) per- 
sonal relationships, 3) spirituality, and 4) ethical 
decision making. Students are asked to develop 
autobiographical responses to a series of questions 
about their lives in order to look for themes re- 
lated to possible careers and relationship issues. 
Additionally, readings, cases and exercises will 
amplify those personal themes and common is- 
sues in life at the turn of the 21st century. The 
integration of spirituality and ethical decision 
making into one's life will be addressed by Bible 
readings, readings on ethical perspectives and 
reflection. The aim is for students completing the 
course to have a more fulfilling life, and to ac- 
knowledge the balance and trade-offs needed in 
an increasingly complex, fast-paced world. 

James Bowditch 
Robert Capalbo 

UN 506 (EN 622) Planning for Success and 
Failure (S: 3) 

"Where do we come from? What are we? Where 
are we going?" (Gauguin) This course is a con- 
cluding meditation on the fundamental questions 
facing students about to graduate. Such questions, 
about family and career, spiritual journey and citi- 
zenship, will be explored in works of literature. 
Emphasis will be on journal keeping as a lifelong 
skill, formulating life problems, structuring in- 
sights, preparing for success and failure. Students 
will be asked to select the most significant texts 
read in their college career. Other works will be 
chosen from a family novel {Father and Son), and 
family therapy text {The Family Crucible), a spiri- 
tual journal {An Interrupted Life), and spiritual saga 
(Dostoevsky), a novel about marriage and career 
(Middlemarch or Robert Elsmere ) and about the 
land (My Antonia). Dennis Taylor 

UN 507 (TH 412) Personal Commitment: The 
Key to Maturity 

Not offered 1 992-93 James O'Donohoe 

UN 508 (PL 271) Holistic Ufe in East and West 

(F:3) 

This course focuses on an integral approach to 
studying human life: self, relationship, family life, 
work, social responsibility, as well as spirituality. 
The course is also a comparative study of East- 



ern and Western philosophy, or different ways of 
life, with special emphasis on Taoism. 

Because of its unique nature, this course makes 
use of various methods involving students' active 
participation. In addition to lectures, we will ex- 
tensively use discussions, journals, and medita- 
tions (or "quiet-sitting"). Students are encouraged 
to make both a reflective synthesis of the central 
themes of this course, and a personal synthesis of 
various aspects of their lives. In so doing, it is 
hoped that we can together explore and achieve 
some degree of knowledge, wisdom, patience, and 
above all tranquility! Frank Soo 

UN 509 Leading a Semi-Intelligent Life 

Not offered 1992-93 John Neuhauser 

UN 510 (CO 470 ) Conflict and Decision (F: 3) 

This course focuses on inevitable questions un- 
derlying undergraduate study as well as critical 
decision-making throughout our lives. As con- 
flicts result from varying priorities within a soci- 
ety, people make critical decisions about justice, 
freedom, social responsibility and spiritual activi- 
ties. As they interact with others, seeking mean- 
ing and attempting to persuade others of their 
values, individuals use "persuasive definitions" 
continually reshaped and reinterpreted, formed 
by language and imagery. This course under- 
scores communication as a dynamic reflection of 
our most cherished values and hopes. It invites 
students to review their education in order to re- 
flect on the lifelong task of integrating their com- 
mitments to work, relationships, citizenship, and 
spiritual development. This Capstone course fea- 
tures the shared viewing of several contemporary 
films relevant to course topics. Ann M. Bany 

UN 51 1 (TH 413) Lives in Progress (S: 3) 

Graduation is a pivotal transition. It results in an 
upheaval requiring assessment and re-ordering of 
the past in order to create a future grounded in 
that past but not bounded by it. We shall study 
our lives up to now as a window to the future, a 
future envisioned not only in our own personal 
history but also in biographies, autobiographies, 
and fictional accounts of men and women search- 
ing for the good life. Thus, the underlying as- 
sumption of this course is that the emotional, 
physical, intellectual, and religious challenges of 
college have not only enthralled us for the mo- 
ment but seeded us for a glorious life that con- 
tinues. Joseph Marchese 

UN 512 (BK 303) (EN 632) The Work of 
Knowing in African-American Life and Art (F: 3) 

"/ wonder if the world is anchored anywhere ?" 

(Melville) 
"The IVay is dying. So what is the Way ?" (Olson) 
After graduation, one learns — all of a sudden — 
that what looked like a smooth path to a happy 
and successful life is often filled with undreamed 
of obstacles and complications. Especially in the 
areas of work, play, love, spirituality and political 
commitment, we find ourselves forced to evalu- 
ate a vast muddle of choices and decisions, behind 
which lurk danger, opportunity, and serious con- 
flict between what we owe to ourselves, and what 
we owe to others, who are our families, our lov- 
ers, our nation, our race. Accordingly, this is a 
course about establishing a "centre", a foundation 
of seaworthy strategies and convictions, which 
have the power to help us to live honorably, mean- 



ingfully and deliberately. The major texts will be 
the lives of black role models and a daily journal 
of your own. The course also requires an inter- 
view with a family member or a public figure, a 
trip to a lecture, a movie or a play, and the read- 
ing of novels, autobiographies, and biographies of 
black people who have faced our problem. 

Henry Blackwell 

UN 513 (EN 627) Ways of Knowing (S: 3) 

This course will ask what we already know — about 
ourselves and the times in which we have lived, 
about the world of ideas, and about the environ- 
ments we create and inhabit. It will also ask how 
we know, how our perspectives as members of 
families and communities, as men and women, as 
students and workers, and as consumers of cul- 
ture influence the intellectual and personal 
choices we make. We will draw primarily on lit- 
erary and historical texts, but also on architecture, 
music, and film, to work toward a consciousness 
about the decisions we have made and the choices 
available to us in the cultures in which we live. 

Carol Hard Green 

UN 514 Personal Growth, Cosmic Destiny 

This course draws parallels between scientific 
theory of evolution and models of personal devel- 
opment. We shall study a significant attempt by 
Teilhard de Chardin to relate our own struggle 
for fullness of life to the unfolding of all life. 

James Skehan, S.J. 

OTHER UNIVERSITY COURSES 

Other University courses are interdisciplinary 
courses which may be offered by various depart- 
ments. For the academic year 1992-93, these 
"UN" courses may be found under the English, 
Philosophy, and Theology departments in the 
Arts and Sciences section, and in the School of 
Education listings in this Catalog. 



School of Education • Degree Requirements • 119 



School of Education 



T 



he School of Education was founded in 1952 as the first 
co-educational undergraduate college on the Chestnut 
X Hill campus. It is one of four undergraduate schools at 
Boston College and is devoted to the general intellectual and spiri- 
tual goals of the university. Its specific purpose, to be achieved in a 
manner consonant with the broader university goals, is to prepare 
young men and women for the education and human service profes- 
sions. Programs are designed to ensure that the students receive a 
general education, professional preparation and a specialized educa- 
tion in their major fields. Faithful to the traditions of Jesuit educa- 
tion, the School of Education is committed to an educational ideal 
wherein its students shall first become broadly educated persons and 
then be competently informed and skilled in the knowledge and tech- 
niques of the teaching and human service professions. The goal is to 
produce highly educated persons who have superior professional 
preparation. 



The School of Education is comprised of two 
departments: the Department of Counseling, De- 
velopmental Psychology and Research Methods 
(Mary Brabeck, Ph.D., Chair), and the Depart- 
ment of Curriculum, Administration and Special 
Education (John Savage, Ed.D., Chair). Students 
may choose to major in Early Childhood Educa- 
tion, Elementary Education, Secondary School 
Education, Special Education, or Human Devel- 
opment. Within the Special Education program 
students may be certified as either Moderate Spe- 
cial Needs or Intense Special Needs Teachers. 

The Secondary School Program is taken in 
conjunction with a major in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Currently, the student may follow 
a program in Biology, Chemistry, Geology or 
Earth Sciences, Physics, English, History, Math- 
ematics, French, Spanish, or Theology. All pro- 
grams, except Theology, lead to Massachusetts 
teacher certification. 

A major in Human Development prepares 
students for graduate study in counseling, educa- 
tional psychology, and related fields. Students in 
this program have obtained employment in vari- 
ous psychological, educational, human service and 
business settings. The ten-course major gives a 
strong background in the area of developmental 
psychology and an introduction to the field of 
counseling. It is specifically designed for students 
who wish to work in non-school settings. 

Many of the programs in the School of Edu- 
cation are designed to prepare students to meet 
state requirements for teacher certification. Since 
many states, including Massachusetts, are in the 
process of revising their certification regulations, 
all programs offered by the School of Education 



may be subject to revision depending upon re- 
quirements of state education certification agen- 
cies. Changes in Massachusetts certification regu- 
lations will be effective October 1, 1994. 

The School of Education also has many dis- 
tinct graduate programs; these are described in 
the Graduate Catalog of Boston College. Stu- 
dents may elect graduate courses in the areas of: 
Developmental and Educational Psychology 
Educational Research; Counseling Psychology 
Special Education; and Curriculum, Instruction, 
and Administration. In some areas of study, a stu- 
dent may complete a Master's degree in an aca- 
demic year and a summer. 

In addition, there are a number of Fifth Year 
programs available for academically superior stu- 
dents through which the bachelor's and the 
master's degree can be earned in 5 years. Please 
refer to the section following the descriptions of 
majors in the School of Education for more in- 
formation about these programs. 

THE PREPARATION OF EDUCATORS 

WITH HANDICAPPING CONDITIONS 

It is the goal of the School of Education to suc- 
cessfully prepare for both receipt of a degree and 
state certification any qualified individual who 
strives to meet these objectives regardless of 
handicapping conditions. The University accepts 
the affirmative duty to assure the accessibility of 
its physical plant and academic programs. After 
an evaluation of a student's capacity to perform 
essential teaching functions, the University will 
engage in any reasonable accommodation within 
its program that would allow a qualified student 
with a handicapping condition to complete the 



program successfully and obtain certification so 
long as such accommodation does not result in the 
student's failure to meet the required knowledge, 
skills and competencies required for both gradu- 
ation and certification. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

All students entering the School of Education are 
to follow a program of study in selected educa- 
tion majors and complete Core requirements and 
electives needed to fulfill degree requirements. A 
second major, either interdisciplinary or in one 
subject discipline, is also required of students in 
the School of Education who are in certification 
programs. Students in the Human Development 
program are not required to have a second ma- 
jor, but are required to complete a minor of at 
least four courses in one subject discipline. All 
programs lead to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Requirements for the Degree 

1 . 1 The bachelor's degree requires the comple- 
tion, with satisfactory cumulative average (at least 
1.667), of at least 38 one-semester courses (each 
carrying a minimum of three semester-hour cred- 
its), normally distributed over eight semesters of 
four academic years. However, students pursuing 
certification programs must complete require- 
ments with a cumulative average of at least 2.5. 

1 .2 Within the 38 courses required for gradua- 
tion, the following 12 courses, comprising the 
Core curriculum, are required of all students. 

• 2 courses in European History 

• 2 courses in Philosophy 

• 2 courses in Theology 

• 1 course in Natural Science 

• 1 course in Mathematics 

• 2 courses in Social Sciences (including 
Sociology, Political Science, Economics, 
Psychology, or Education) 

• 2 courses in English 

Students are advised to select Core courses 
very carefully, making sure they satisfy the Core 
requirement in each department in Arts and Sci- 
ences. Identification of Core courses can be de- 
termined by contacting the appropriate depart- 
ment head in Arts and Sciences and by reference 
to each semester's Schedule of Courses. Students are 
encouraged to complete Core courses in the 
freshman and sophomore years. 

1.3 A second major, either interdisciplinary or 
in an Arts and Sciences subject discipline, is cur- 
rently required of all students in certification pro- 
grams. This major should be in an area which 
complements the student's program in the School 
of Education. These majors must have the ap- 
proval of the student's Program Coordinator. 
Students in certification programs are encouraged 
to declare their liberal arts majors early so that 
they are eligible to take courses restricted to ma- 
jors in these disciplines. Students in the Human 
Development program are not required to have 
a second major, but are required to complete a 
minor of at least four courses in one subject dis- 
cipline. 



120 • School of Education • Academic Regulations 



1.4 A major program of studies within the 
School of Education must be declared by all stu- 
dents and approved by the Office of the Assistant 
Dean of the School of Education before the end 
of the sophomore year. Basic skills will be assessed 
before students are accepted to specific teacher 
preparation programs. 

1.5 All students in the School of Education must 
be formally confirmed for specific programs in the 
School of Education. Students enrolled in the 
School of Education must complete and submit 
a program confirmation form to the appropriate 
Program Coordinator before the end of the 
sophomore year. Early program confirmation is 
encouraged. 

1.6 The remaining courses required for gradu- 
ation include additional major courses, minor 
courses, and electives. The major will be deter- 
mined in conjunction with the student's advisor. 

Normal Program 

2.1 Program Distribution: The normal course 
load for freshmen, sophomores, and juniors is five 
courses each semester; for seniors, four courses. 
A freshman or sophomore who wishes to take only 
four courses may do so but must have the approval 
of the Office of the Assistant Dean. A sixth course 
may be taken by students whose average is at least 
2.9. A student whose average is between 2.0 and 
2.9 must obtain approval for a sixth course from 
the Office of the Assistant Dean, and, as with all 
courses, from the department involved. Average 
is here taken to mean the student's most recent 
semester average or cumulative average, which- 
ever is higher. 

2.2 Students are required to pass the Profes- 
sional Development Seminar for Freshmen dur- 
ing the first semester of the freshman year. 

2.3 During the first two years students are re- 
quired to enroll each year in a minimum of six 
credits in Education, unless otherwise approved 
by the Office of the Assistant Dean. 

2.4 No more than eleven courses may be taken 
for credit in one year without special permission 
of the Office of the Assistant Dean. 

2.5 Full-time status for a student in any class 
requires enrollment in at least four courses in each 
semester. 

2.6 Tuition shall apply each semester as pub- 
lished, even if the student carries the minimum 
full-time load or less. 

2.7 Acceleration: Acceleration of degree pro- 
grams is possible in exceptional circumstances, 
provided the Assistant Dean's approval is obtained 
at least two full semesters before early graduation 
and University policies governing acceleration are 
followed. 

2.8 The only courses which a student, after ad- 
mission to Boston College, may apply toward a 
School of P'.ducation degree (whether for Core, 
major, or total-course requirements) will be those 
taken at Boston College in a regular course of 
study during the academic year. The Office of the 
Assistant Dean is authorized to grant exceptions 
to the provisions of this regulation for the follow- 
ing situations: 

• official cross registration programs 

• the Junior Year Abroad Program 



• official college exchange programs 

• special study programs authorized by the Office 
of the Assistant Dean 

• removal of deficiencies incurred by failure, 
withdrawal from a course, or course underload 

• subject to certain restrictions, courses in the 
Evening College of Arts and Sciences and Business 
Administration as approved by the Office of the 
Assistant Dean of Education prior to enrollment 
in the course. 

Any of the above exceptions granted must be 
based on prior written approval from the Office 
of the Assistant Dean. 

Transfer into the School of Education 

3.1 The School of Education expects that stu- 
dents transferring into it from other schools of 
Boston College will have a record free of academic 
deficiencies and a cumulative average of at least 
2.5 and will complete at least four semesters of 
full-time study in Education after the transfer. 

3.2 For students who have transferred from a 
college or university other than Boston College, 
courses which have been granted transfer credit 
and which are similar to the offerings of Boston 
College will count toward degree requirements. 

3.3 Students transferring into the School of 
Education must meet with the appropriate Pro- 
gram Coordinator and have their programs of 
study confirmed as soon as possible after admis- 
sion to the School of Education, but prior to the 
beginning of classes. 

3.4 Official transfer applications must be sub- 
mitted to the Assistant Dean for Students before 
November 30 for spring semester admissions and 
before April 1 5 for fall semester admissions. 

Pass/Fail Electives 

4.1 In sophomore, junior, or senior year a stu- 
dent may, with the approval of the department of- 
fering the course, take an elective course on a pass/ 
fail basis. No more than one pass/fail course may 
be taken in any semester. The course(s) must be 
in a department other than the one(s) in which the 
student is majoring; pass/fail evaluations may not 
be sought in Core or major courses. A student 
must indicate his or her desire to take a course on 
a pass/fail basis at registration time in the Office 
of the Assistant Dean. 

4.2 No more than three courses for which the 
final grade is "pass" will be counted toward a de- 
gree. 

Fulfillment of Requirements by 
Equivalencies 

5.1 In the following circumstances, departments 
may rule that specific degree requirements may 
be met by equivalencies for certain courses. 

5.2 A student, anytime before senior year, may 
be relieved of a Core requirement without receiv- 
ing credit by demonstrating, by means of an 
equivalency examination, to the chairperson of a 
department that administers courses satisfying the 
Core requirement, that he or she has mastered the 
content of such a course. 

5.3 In certain departments there are courses in 
which continuation in the second semester is in- 
trinsically dependent upon mastering the content 
of the first semester. A student who fails or with- 
draws from the first semester of such a course, 



may, with the approval of the Office of the Assis- 
tant Dean, be allowed to continue in the course 
and gain credit and the grade of D- for the first 
semester by passing the second semester satisfac- 
torily (with a C+ or better, if graded). This regu- 
lation may be applied also to Pass/Fail electives 
involving a two-semester offering provided both 
semesters are taken Pass/Fail. The grade of Pass, 
rather than D- will be awarded for the first semes- 
ter in such cases. A list of departments and courses 
where these regulations apply is on file in the 
Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences. 

Requirements for Good Standing 

6.1 In order to remain in the School, a student 
must maintain a cumulative average of at least 
1 .667 as the minimum standard of scholarship and 
have passed at least nine courses by the beginning 
of the second year, nineteen by the beginning of 
the third year, and twenty-nine by the beginning 
of the fourth year. 

6.2 Failure to maintain good standing, either 
through a low cumulative average or by incurring 
failures and/or withdrawals, or by taking an un- 
approved underload, will result in the student's 
being placed on warning, or being required to 
withdraw from the School, as the Academic Stan- 
dards Committee shall determine. Unless the stu- 
dent returns to good standing by the approved 
methods (see Course Make-up) or if the student 
incurs additional failures or withdrawals, or car- 
ries an unapproved underload, while on warning, 
the student will be required to withdraw from the 
School at the time of the next review. 

6.3 A student who has not passed seventeen 
courses after two years or twenty-seven after three 
years will be required to withdraw. If seven 
courses are not passed in one year, withdrawal will 
be required. If a student passes less than two 
courses in a semester, the Academic Standards 
Committee may require immediate withdrawal. 

6.4 No student may begin a given academic year 
in September with more than one deficiency. 
Three deficiencies within an academic year will 
mean dismissal. A deficiency is defined as a fail- 
ure in a course, a withdrawal from a course, or an 
unapproved underload. 

Course Make-up 

7.1 A student who has failed or withdrawn from 
a course may make up the credit by passing an 
additional approved course during the regular 
school year or in a summer session at Boston 
College (with a grade of at least C-), or at another 
accredited four-year college (with a grade of at 
least C-). All make-up courses must be authorized 
by the Office of the Assistant De